which inlet is which on Hotpoint WD61?

I've just acquired a Hotpoint WD61. This has two unmarked inlets on the back, one above the other. Which one is which?
Also (now I have your attention) - is it okay to connect the cold feed only?
-- Roger
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Are you sure there isn't an "H" and a "C" stamped on the back panel near the inlets. That's how it is on my GE washer (same manufacturer). And it is ok to connect up to the cold feed only but be sure to put a cap on the hot water inlet or use a "Y". Otherwise, if you should happen to select a warm water setting, the cold water would run out the hot inlet side. This is the way the portable washers that hook up to the kitchen sink are set up. with just a cap on the hot side.
Tom G.
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You mean the cold side.
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Well, noo. Hook the water to the cold inlet, set the water temp mix to cold wash/cold rinse. Put a cap over the hot inlet so that if you accidently turn the water temp mix to warm, the valve doesn't open both inlets to mix and allow the water to backflow out the hot inlet. I assumed the op wasn't planning on washing clothes all in hot water and it wouldn't matter anyway because if the hot hose was hooked to the cold inlet that's what is going to be ushered into the machine no matter what the mix valve knob says.

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Hook a hose up to one. Call for hot water fill-if water comes in, that's the hot water connection.
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1. find your washer model number at: http://www.repairclinic.com/0089.asp?apptype 
2. maybe: "Measure the temperature of the water in the washing machine because the temperature will drop as the water travels from the water heater to the washing machine. For each one foot of water pipe the temperature drops one degree. Detergent and appliance manufacturers agree that detergent effectiveness declines rapidly in water below 70 degrees F (21 degrees C). Cold water washes are not economically sound; no detergent is effective in water below 60 degrees F (16 degrees C).
Most fibers can be washed in hot water except woolly acetate, olefin (polypropylene) and some acrylics. Permanent press fabrics will wrinkle more when washed in hot water. However, if permanent press articles are heavily soiled you will get better results by using hot water, plenty of detergent and your iron.
While hot water is still best for cleaning clothes, studies show that most consumers use warm water washes more frequently than either hot or cold. A warm wash is a fifty/fifty mixture of hot and cold water. Keep in mind that the temperature of your cold water varies considerably depending on the season and geographic location. As long as the water temperature does not fall below 70 degrees F (21 degrees C), you will still be getting your clothes clean.
Hot or warm water is not necessary for rinsing. Cold water rinsing is just as effective and does save fuel costs.
If lower water temperatures are used in the wash cycle, consumers should presoak, pretreat heavily soiled areas, agitate longer, and use additional detergent. For cold water washes, use one and one-half the recommended amount of detergent and dissolve the detergent prior to adding it to the wash water." from: http://extension.missouri.edu/explore/hesguide/clothing/gh0134.htm
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