Which do you like more, split ring lock washers or the other kind?

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Which do you like more, split ring lock washers or the other kind?
Why?
What you call the other kind?
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mm wrote:

Depends on the application.
"toothed" either internal or external would be the types you're thinking of; there are others as well.
--
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In '92 I went to a hardware auction (closing). No way can I use a couple thousand toothed washers?. They will last me a lifetime :-/
Original box and all sorted, labeled, etc.
What size ya need
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Oren wrote: ...

LOL...
I've never had the fortune--there was a closeout of a local discount store here a number of years ago that had a decent hardware section as well as the general no-use stuff. I tried to buy the whole set of specialty fasteners, etc., and the bolt bins but they refused to sell them as a group...turned out that they had already cut a deal w/ some outfit for all that was left after the individual sales and they included the bins and stuff specifically in their bid... :(
--
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Thanks all for the replies

Yeah, toothed is the word.
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re: What you call the other kind?
You mean the 20 or so "other kinds" shown here?
http://www.thread-rite.com/shel/tr_livelock.htm
I guess I could honestly say that I've never actually *bought* tooth washers. The few that I have came with something else and got stuck in the little parts bin.
BTW Didja know that split washers can be custom fitted by collapsing or expanding the split?
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

There's also using nylocks or loctite.
Depends upon the application.
Jon
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On Mon, 23 Nov 2009 16:37:34 -0500, mm wrote:

Ahh, the joys of loosening one of those on some ancient, oily bit of kit then undoing it by hand, only to find that a nice little sliver of metal's gone deep into your fingertip...

There are lots, as someone mentioned. I don't mind the ones we always called 'star washers', like those on that site, but split-ring ones are nasty...
I don't mind good ol' nyloks, either.
cheers
Jules
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Like others have said, it depends. But, I would opt for the nylocks first. If for some reason they would work loose, they don't fall off after they loosen. Whereas, split ring or star washers may lose its nut and the part it si holding after loosening.
Hank
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I used to use split ring lock washers but after switching to lock nuts, either nylocks (?) or deformed threaded thread style I stopped using lock washers and gave them all away.
Lock washers often damage the item that they bear against & aren;t all that effective against vibration caused loosening.
Lotite has a great range of excellent products. Loctite 242 (blue) can be defeated with wrench force, Loctite 271 needs to be heated ~300F+ to remove.
I've never had a properly prepared & Loctited assembly come loose.
cheers Bob
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wrote:

Thanks for the reply. 3 people recommemded nylock, plus you recommend Loctite. I'll have to make more use of them. (Up to this point, I had never bought a nylok and only used Loctite on an engine or something with a lot of vibration.)
But still, let me ask you all.
I have loads of lock washers I've removed from things I disassembled, and if it's a choice between split ring and toothed lock washers, do you have a preference then?
Usually I put a flat washer, then a lock washer, and then the nut.
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I like split rings best. But when I have to choose between toothed & split ring.....I choose loctite or nylocks. :)
cheers Bob
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mm wrote:

I Like Nylocks and a flat washer on things that will need to be disassembled on occasion for servicing. I often use a split ring and SAE washer with a drop of wicking Loctite for good measure which will keep corrosion out of the threads in case the item needs disassembly. Loctite not only will hold a nut or screw in place but will prevent rust from destroying the threads on the fastener. One thing about a split washer is that it is a good indicator of when a nut or bolt is tight enough. Sometimes a grade 5 bolt can be easy to break by a gorilla like me. *snicker*
TDD
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mm wrote: ...

Why do you have them left over when you reassembled the item--or you mean salvaged???
You've still never given even a hint of what you're talking about using them on. W/O context there's no specific answer imo.
In general, internal toothed washers are used where there's reason for the cosmetic "neater" appearance or the materials are such they work better. I think one can get them up to inch or larger but most generally one sees them on #10 or smaller machine screws, etc.
Nylok works of course, but is a pita since have to work to unthread the entire distance whereas a washer releases in a much shorter distance.
All in all, my preference is as stated before, highly dependent upon the application. Being farmer and therefore dealing mostly w/ large and heavy-use stuff, the split is essentially universal and I've no issues w/ it.
--
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Hahaha. I've only had about 20 parts left over during reaassemly. I think that is total for the last 45 years, but I only do this stuff in my spare time. These washers, screws, nuts, jacks, etc. are from things I'm throwing away.

I have no particular project in mind. It comes up whenever I need a lockwash. Yesterday I did have a project, but I've already been through my 8 oz Parkay margerine container of lock washers and picked one out, and no one is going to say one kind is so horrible it won't work for this simple and rather temporary use. But that's what brought the question to mind again.

Looks is only important maybe 1/5 of the time.

Oh, yeah, good point.

Okay!
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mm wrote: ...

Well, again, each design has its reason for existence...if it's no particular consequence probably could do w/o just as well...
...

OTOH, when it is important it's important 100% for that application (back to my point yet again of "it all depends")...
...
--
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It's a good idea to use new lock-washers for important jobs...they do lose their bite!
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On Wed, 25 Nov 2009 07:05:57 -0800 (PST), Bob Villa

I'm not sure i've ever had an important job, but I'm still hoping to.
I'll keep your words in mind.
Thanks all.
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wrote:

The fact that you usually use two washers together (one of them not being a lock washer) could negate the locking ability of the lock washer. The assembly could loosen between the component being assembled and the flat washer.
Also if you are working with electrical connections you should use a non-intuitive assembly order. The first component should be the lock washer (preferably an internal tooth or an external tooth -- not a split ring) followed by the electrical terminal then a flat washer and finally the nut.
Most people would place the electrical terminal on the component first. Then they would assemble the lock washer and finally the nut. If assembled in that order the electrical terminal (because it is locked to the nut) could, if force is applied to it, act as a wrench to loosen the nut. Not a good situation.
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Gordon Shumway wrote:

... There are a zillion applications of that and it doesn't seem to be a problem. Virtually every connection on farm equipment is that way and it surely gets hard use/vibration/etc., ...
The flat washer in many of those instances serves to provide the bearing surface on oblong holes for adjustment.
--
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