where to get some super-warm, XXL, mittens?

Hard to find are gloves or mittens for large hands.
Google helps, but you really don't know if the product (mittens) is any good -- or not, eg made in China.
Also, will it hold up, like being worn when shoveling snow, which puts immense stress on not just the seams but also the material itself?
Also, I'm just plain getting too old to put up with freezing hands when out on a winter-day's walk -- or shoveling snow for two or three hours (only to have the snow-plow-truck pile it up again, with HEAVY, wet, soon-to-freeze-solid stuff, at the start of the driveway, meaning another hard hour out there.)
Recommendations?
Thanks!
David
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On 12/12/2012 2:39 PM, David Combs wrote: ...

...
Blower????
--
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On 12/12/2012 1:42 PM, dpb wrote:

move? it's 78F here today
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Yeah, agreed. I grew up in that "40 below" crap. Still can't understand why people live like that.
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Hear! Hear!
Go ahead, put that big pile at my EOD (in snow blowing terms, it the "End Of Driveway", not the start). I'll just blow it away.
I hate mittens...I need my fingers. Buy a pair of tight fitting cloth gloves and cut the tips off so that your finger tips are exposed. Then go to a sporting goods/hunting store and get a pair of good gloves big enough to go over the "homeless man's gloves". The cloth gloves will add extra warmth and you can take off the outer gloves if you need your fingers for something intricate. Your hands will stay warm for quite a while with the cloth gloves.
I know they make mittens with tops that fold back, exposing fingertip- less gloves, but since I hate mittens, I made my own glove version as described above.
I actually start wearing finger-less gloves quite often around this time of year, like for walking the dogs, etc. My hands stay warm, but I have full use of my fingers.
I got a pair of these for $2 at HD because the tag had fallen off and no one could figure out how much they were supposed to be:
http://www.homedepot.com/buy/grease-monkey-fingerless-glove---large-22103.html
I wear those by themselves but for "undergloves" I buy a few cheap pairs of cloth gloves from the dollar store. You want them to fit tight so you can get a pair of regular gloves over them.
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Well, my fingers freeze in gloves. With mittens, my fingers, instead of each being surrounded by the cold, have each other to keep them warm. The middle fingers have something between one third and one half of their surroundings being another supplied-with-warm-blood finger.

Myself, for cold indoors, cut slots in ankle-length athletic socks, so my fingers can stick out but palms stay relatively warm -- AND -- I can still type on the keyboard. Not so with with manufactured fingerless gloves that I've tried -- can't get my fingers close enough together to touch-type on the keyboard.

Good ideas!
But for me, fitting tight cuts off the circulation a little (long, thin arms).
For shoveling snow, mittens work fine for me. But my hands still get cold after a while.
Question: what does the Army use when it's really cold, or they're mountain troops?
David
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Yeah, but blowers sure don't do much when the snow is wet and heavy, or have been shoved into a wet super-heavy wall by the city's snow plow truck, blocking the driveway.
Gotta attack by hand, and quickly, before it freezes!
David
PS: actually, I don't do the whole driveway, just the part at the top (slopes up to the street) in front of and around where we keep the car at those times.
And just that is a real bitch, with that snow-plow truck coming by every 90 minutes or so.
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snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote: -snip-

Check out a single stage. My old Toro electric gets pulled out when we get super wet snow. It will empty a slush-puddle and toss that slop 20 feet. [good heavy slush will go 30. . . regular snow 40+.]
They don't cut ice chunks like a big honking gas machine-- but for wet snow. . .
Jim
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snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote:

When I spent a lot of time outside my best/warmest/longest wearing mittens were a pair of unlined leather mittens and a couple pairs of wool liners. The mittens were big enough that if I needed to use fingers sometimes I could wear a pair of gloves in them instead of the knit mittens. The leather shed most wet snow and never wore out.
The looked similar to these- http://duluthpack.com/plunge-mitts.html?gclid=CPOg5JvolbQCFUOK4AodPGQADQ

For walking mittens are great.

i'll repeat the recommendation for a snow blower.<g> you're obviously too friggin' old to be shoveling snow if your hands still get cold while you're working.
Jim
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REI would be my first choice Snowmobile mittens is also a choice
The new Fleece lined ones can be quite warm In many the liner and outer shell are separate and you can buy more liners to just were them without the liner The thing with fleece is that some of them are way too thick and give you sweaty hands that will chill in the long run Balancing the thickness of the fleece vs how cold it is is the trick
When I'm out in the woods I wear 3 layers 1) Tight-knit fingertip-less gloves 2) Fleece gloves 3a) Nylon waterproof shell mittens 3b or fleece-lined waterproof shell mittens With that combination, I have been comfortable right down to -40
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Any store that supplies farmers, mechanics, linesmen etc., i.e. people who must work out of doors in all weathers. The nearest to me is called Princess Auto.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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On 12 Dec 2012 15:39:17 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote:

Gander Mountain if you have one of those stores nearby. Otherwise, find a local leather shop, or find a woman that sews and knits and have them custom made.
Some of the rural farm supply stores also have a lot of that stuff.
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I can't be positive, but after returning two down coats, one an alleged "Alaskan Guide Parka" (whatta laugh!) to has-been Bean and Crapelas, I'm gonna try these guys:
http://www.refrigiwear.com/Gloves/id-0419/Double_Insulated_Cowhide_ ???
I recall wearing a Refrigiwear coat decades ago, it being so dang warm hadda occasionally take it off to avoid sweating. I don't know if this is still the case all these years later, but their stuff is still USA made. I also notice they have XXL glove sizes.
HTH nb
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I have trouble finding loose gloves. Mittens are necessary for best warmth. Try a ski shop, sporting goods. One year I bought a thin glove with metal reflecting shreads in it, to be used alone or with gloves. Seemed to work well.
Greg
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Thanks, all. Will check out some the places mentioned!
David
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Thanks again!
David
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