Where to get LED Pole Light Bulb/Fixture

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I have one of the typical 175W Mercury Vapor light fixtures in my farm that looks like this:
http://www.budgetlighting.com/gfx/maxlite/ML4HM651AC_thumb.jpg
It appears that the bulbs are being banned. They sell a replacement Compact Florescent bulb, but it appears that no one can agree on whether they just get screwed into the existing fixture, or I need a new fixture head with a different ballast. (I have asked several sales people at several stores ann no one can agree on this).
However, even if I could get a correct answer, I bet it wont light properly in very cold weather and will be dim, or not light at all, which is what happens when I flip on my CF bulbs in my garage in winter (I now just replace them in winter with standard bulbs).
Anyhow, if I got to replace the fixture, I'm not going to even bother with a CF bulb, and would rather pay a little more and go with a LED fixture. I did not think that LED technology was up to this level, but then I drove into a small rural town and found out that they replaced all the street lights with LED types. They provided adaquate light. They seemed a little too bluish in color, but I know LEDs come in all colors, and they should have a whiter color. (I am seeing these used a lot for stage lighting lately, by music bands)
The problem is finding them. I have googled and cant seem to find anything for my needs. I did find some commercial street lighting, but they seemed to only be for commercial use.
Do any of you know of LED fixtures for this use? Or do they make a LED bulb that can be put into my existing fixture (probably by eliminating the ballast)?
Thanks
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On Apr 18, 3:38 am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:
The spiral fluorescent (hardly compact,it's huge) has a mogul base and you could remove the original ballast used for MV. Anyway, I have many fixtures at work that use exterior, double-head, fluorescent floods and they have been working fine for 3 years in Wisconsin. These are electronically designed for cold weather starts.
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On Mon, 18 Apr 2011 04:22:20 -0700 (PDT), Bob Villa

Those are the bulbs I have looked at in the stores and no one could tel me if I can use it with the ballast. More than one told me I need a new fixture, some told me I can use it in my MV fixture. I actually thought about disconnecting the ballast. How long does it take them to get to full brightness when the temp is MINUS 30 in January?
I'm trying to cut my electric consumption, my bills are way too high. I figured it costs me $8.50 to $10 per month to run the 175W MV bulbs for power (depends on length of darkness hours). They need replacement about every 3 years, the bulbs are $12, but it costs me about $60 to have them installed, because there is no way in hell that I'll go up there on a ladder. I had a ladder accident once and that's the last time. Adding this all up, it's costing me about $160 per year just for that one light.
I dont know what the wattage consumption is on those florescent bulbs? (what is it?).
I was told that LED would be around 25W. That would cost me $1.00 to $1.75 per month, and installation should be a one time deal.
The savings would be $90 to $100 per year for power, plus the installation and bulb cost, which is roughly another $25 per year. So, I'd be saving around $120 per year.
At that rate, I'd be happy to pay $100 to $250 for a LED bulb. It will pay for itself in one to two years, and should never need replacement. If the color is a little off, so be it. It's a security light for people, livestock, and other reasons. If I need to work outside in the dark, I have other work lights to use.
I DO NOT want a sodium light. I cant stand that orange color. My neighbor has one of them and in fog it looks like the place is on fire. I dont need to come home in a panic thinking my house is on fire.
Metal Halide is not much of a savings in consumption, and then I have to buy a new fixture, and pay to have it installed. No thanks, I may as well spend more and get LED.
I have seen LED street lights and they are not too bad at all. Actually I was googling for LED street lights since I posted my original message and found a few listings but no prices and they are sold in large quantities only.
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This doesn't say anything about an exterior ap...the ones I have take less time than a MV to get to full brightness. (and as you can see- they have their own ballast)
http://www.buylightfixtures.com/mogul-base-compact-fluorescent-bulbs.aspx
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If you're worried about slow start-up...leave it on when it's extremely cold. (you seem to be dead-set on this LED stuff when they almost have all the bugs out of CF bulbs)
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On Apr 19, 12:26 am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Flourescent wont save over MV, and leds are totaly deceptive in their ratings. First by design they are a spot light, Check lumen ratings LPW, I dont think they are much at all better than MV. Buy one to test it from a place with a good return policy. There is HPS and LPS, low pressure sodium is real orange, High pressure sodium is less orange and what is commercialy used for many highways and in many big cities. HPS is alot more efficient than MV, Low pessure sodium if they still make them are even more efficient as of severl years ago. LEDs have electronics that have not passed real life testing. Maybe a lower watt bulb with a reflector enclosure will help. My Cfl floods do maybe 70% at -10f.
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the city of pittsburgh is spending humongous bucks replacing existing street lights with LEDs that use a fraction of the energy are far brighter and last forever
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Maybe im not up on the best new stuff, I hope they get real longlong guarantee on the lights.
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To make as much light as a 175W mercury with LEDs needs about 60 watts.
--
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)

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On Apr 19, 9:45 pm, snipped-for-privacy@manx.misty.com (Don Klipstein) wrote:

The charts I see have MV at 25-60 LPW, What Led is 180 LPW ? If you are in the range of 75LPW on a Led then where is the savings considering cost and a unknown life on the electronics. MH seems to be a safer bet to save and Sodium even better
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On Thu, 21 Apr 2011 06:55:39 -0700 (PDT), ransley

What is the big worry about the electronics? All you need to operate a LED bulb is the LED itself and one resistor for every LED. Aside from lightning damage, they will last forever, and if one of the LEDs does die, the others still work, and only a very small amount of light is lost. Look at these sidewalk solar lights. One small solar cell charges them and they last all night. Those things will likely last forever too, except for the Nicad battery in them. Most people will toss the whole light because of a bad battery, but the batteries can be replaced. I have taken apart several of them, and even modified them.
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I believe in LED's for flashlights,indicators,and decorations. Every LED nightlight I have bought starts out with adequate output...but dims to useless. I won't waste the money until they are usable. And I don't doubt it will happen, it's just that China is flooding the market with crap.
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On Apr 22, 12:22 am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

What is the life expectancy of resistors? How well do the handle surges, spikes, low and high voltage and extreme temps- -20-130? Leds last but I have questions. Im sure they will eventualy get thing right , but these are my concerns.
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<snip>
 

Active component (LED) would fail before a passive component (resistor).
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On Fri, 22 Apr 2011 09:01:32 -0700 (PDT), Bob Villa

You got that right. Aside from lightning or severe voltage spikes, there is little chance of failure. Resistors are pretty stable and rarely fail aside from overloading them with excessive current.
Solid ON, LED light circuits do not contain ICs which are the most prone to failure from power spikes, (except) the stage lighting variety which likely contains ICs and capacitors for dimming purposes.
Christmas LED lights are the same. If they are always ON, they are just LEDs and resistors, with some series wiring to cope with 120VAC. The Christmas lights that flash, or have markee functions DO contain LEDs. There are several articles on wikipedia about LED christmas lights and other LED lighting.
Hell, I may just make my own yard light if I cant find something to buy.
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On Fri, 22 Apr 2011 00:22:31 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

All you need to operate an LED is a resistor, sure, but it's a lot more complicated if you want to operate it efficiently or from a low voltage (like your NiCd).
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Resistors produce heat - a waste of power. Electronics that use inductors or high leakage reactance transformers or flyback-type transformers are used instead to waste less power producing heat than resistors do.
<SNIP>
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- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)

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ransley wrote:

I was talking about lower end of likely power requirement, based on 100 LPW, which is high end of actual lighting class LED bulbs and fixtures out there now. This is even including a lumen of cool white LED light typically achieving more nighttime outdoor illumination than a lumen of mercury light, due to mercury's low scotopic/photopic ratio.
A 175W mercury achieves 48-49 LPW, more like 44-45 LPW after ballast losses. If not for cool white LED light being more visible to night vision than mercury light is, an LED fixture would need 84 watts to produce as much illumination as a 175W mercury fixture with the same light distribution pattern.
One more thing: 175W mercury fixtures often waste light into directions where it is not needed. LED and halogen fixtures are generally not as bad in that area. That can reduce the power requirement of an LED fixture being used to replace a 175W mercury fixture.
But beware the hype many LED bulbs and fixtures have for light output and life expectancy!
--
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)

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** Why not just replace it with another type of HID, like Metal Halide. Here is a similar fixture to what you have: http://www.lightstoreusa.com/product/dusk-to-dawn-with-arm-100-watt-metal-halide-1664.cfm

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On Apr 18, 3:38 am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

You can buy MV bulbs anywhere If you want something several times more efficient go high pressure sodium. If you want better light color go Metal Halide. When it gets cold, true a cfl wont go full bright but you could simply bypass the transformer ballast. Flourescent last about the same as MV. Led is the last thing I would do they cost to much, the bulbs may last but what about the electronics package? The color is cold and they are no more efficient than what you have. If you want to save electricity High Pressure Sodium is the best, but the color is orangeish, its what is most use for street lighting because its the most efficient. I wouldnt worry about MV bulbs being discontinued if you want to keep the light and save now, just buy a few bulbs now, mine last years. They advertise Leds as lasting nearly forever, but electronics control them, and none have been out that long and you dont know how they will survive surges, spikes and real life, and the cost, is outragous for regular lights. clear Leds are the least efficient, red and yellow are truely eficient.
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