Where to get high quality external stove top vent cover?

I give up, in my search for an external vent cover I've only found instant trash out there.
Have an Arietta CHN001MX30 or CHN001MX36 stove top vent that goes straight out the external wall.
Two problems, the installer [unavailable now], placed the vent so low, you hit your face on its edge while working at the stove! OK, move it up, which brings to the next problem....
The original vent hole goes through 2x6 exterior wall and is covered with a cheap plastic grill cover. The house set empty for approx 1 year before we bought. During that time the poor method of vent cover resulted in the desert winds blowing the kitchen area full of fine red dust - everywhere!
So what I need is a high quality vent cover that closes when not in use.
The waste of money products I've seen so far are absolutely amazing. Everything from tin flap that will rattle in a wind and not even keep closed either. To one that is an apparent attempt at better performance: with padding and screen wire, but NO POSITIVE CLOSURE, still just a flap with no force to keep it closed in the closed position.
Something as simple as adding a cantilevered weight to one of these cheap flaps would be better. Hold tight(er) in closed position and once starts to open, very easy to open as the weight applies less closing force. Or, should I patent this?
So question: where is best source of good vent cover?
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On Thursday, March 29, 2012 9:35:57 AM UTC-4, Robert Macy wrote:

If you put a weight or a spring on the vent cover, the vent blower will not be able to blow it open.
Vent covers are designed to be blown open when the wind comes from the inside, and blow closed when the wind comes from the outside. No spring or weight necessary.
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On Mar 29, 1:23 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

You're missing my point!
Look at a standard vent cover. When shut, it is vertical, which means there is absolutely NO force holding it shut. When the fan comes on, and the flap tilts, then [when you don't want much closing force] there is closing force creating useless head pressure for the fan!
What I talked about was the OPPOSITE effect. Substantial force keeping it closed, but when open almost no force trying to shut it.
I did not mention a spring, which if properly installed could be used, but more likely it would be used in some stupid manner, making it more difficult to open and keep open. Nor did I mention a weight that would be like a 'heavy' flap, impeding the fan more, but rather a cantilevered weight that actually HOLDS the vent flap closed when the flap is in the vertical position.yet as the flap opens the weight shifts to almost apply NO force in trying to close the flap. Thus, you win twice. The flap is held shut until opened. And once opened there is little force to shut it, so the fan runs steady state with very little head pressure.
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Sounds like you want a very weak magnet-type defvice, the magnet has just a little force to hold the vent closed, but weak enough that the blower can overcome the force. Design one and sell it to the world after you patent it.
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wrote:

Clever!
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Ok, that's two forms. one totally passive using a cantilevered weight. The other, uses a gravity wedge that absolutely does not allow the flap to open unless/until a solenoid is powered to lift the wedge up out of the way of the flap. Thus, power fan, power solenoid.
. . . . SERIOUSLY. Where do I get a high quality 8 inch vent fan cover for my stove top vent?
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/where-to-get-high-quality-external-stove-top-vent-cover-691111-.htm Kevin Crotty wrote: Did you every find a cover? My vent cover for my cooktop is rattling and driving me nuts. I may try felt weather striping. Thanks. Kevin Robert Macy wrote:

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On Oct 14, 8:44 pm, Kevin Crotty

Here are the ONLY two sources I found from this URL: <http://www.copperlab.com Email: snipped-for-privacy@copperlab.com Phone: 651-341-4931 Fax: 651-204-6844 stucco flush vent 8 inch diameter with louvres $270 !!!
EXACT COPY OF Copperlab,!!!! VentsUSA St. Paul, MN tel: 612 293 7083 fax: 651 646 0917
=-=-= Very easy to work with, I ordered from these people: $180 copper stainless tube
Thunderbird Wall Vents (800) 658-2473 1148 North Marshall Ave. El Cajon, CA 92020 Tel: (619) 448-3567 fax: (619) 448-9072 http://www.thunderbirdproducts.com
They cut the tube length from 8 inch down to around 6 3/4 inch with no additional charge
The item was heavy. Went right in and absolutely disappears on the wall.
Looks great.
Our stove top vent has a builtin spring damper [butterfly flaps] right at the fan. Then the louvres at the exit point provide a 'double' stop if you will
All in all, I'm very disappointed in the design of damper valves. They are completely wrong. There is NO real positive pressure to keep them closed. As the vent opens there is more and more resistance to the vanes opening, which impedes air flow. The vent should be designed so that there is positive pressure to keep it closed, but once it starts to open there should be less and less impediment to the vanes opening.
Two ways to do it. One uses gravity and the other uses better spring locations.
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