Where to drill holes in sump basin

I am installing a sump basin in my basement to help with occasional high water table issues. This has no perimeter french drain right now, but could be added down the road. In any event, I was told to drill several holes in the basin to allow the water to come in, but where do you drill the holes? If I drill on the bottom, that means water will always be in the pit even during dry spells, but will allow water into the pit quicker during a rainstorm, thus pumping it out quicker. If I drill holes on the sides, then there would be no water in the pit, but during a rainstorm, the water will not get into the pit until it reaches the level of the side holes, thus making the water come "closer" to floor level. Is there a happy medium as to where the holes should be drilled?
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In my sump basin which was store bought and not diy fabricated the holes are drilled from top to bottom
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There is nothing wrong with having water in the bottom of the pit at all times, as long as you set the float level so it does not trip on the lower water level. I agree with Jim, put holes all over so that the water table stays below the floor level.
I would also do a readon check after the system is installed, having a place where radon can escape into your basement means you should be careful. I put a cover on my sump and then a 4" flexible pipe from a hole in the cover to the outside with a constantly running fan in the middle of the run to keep a slightly negative presssure in the sump. Cut my radon down from above 4 to about 1.
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On Fri, 14 Jan 2011 07:08:52 -0800 (PST), "hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net"

The guy I bought my house from told me to put something in the sump so it wouldnt' smell bad, but I forget what he said, and I've never smelled anything in the sump anyhow. He was very fastidiious, except he didnt' know how to caulk, spackle, or paint properly.

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OK, thanks for the responses.
Another question is this is going into my furnace room. I also have a HW heater and an A/C condensate drain that goes into small pump, which pumps it outside. Is there any harm if I lead the discharge line into the sump? Would it not drain into the earth rather than get pumped out?
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Unless local code says otherwise, routing the condensate drain the the sump is OK and I've seen it done routinely here in NJ in new construction. IMO a better solution that using a condensate pump. Far less run cycles and during dry periods, no pumping at all.
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On Jan 14, 1:42pm, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

When installing sump dig hole large, and put gravel in bottom and all around sump. Then cement arund top.
You want the water to easily enter the sump. Think of many holes smaller than the gravel
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I thought about doing the sump thing but ended up getting a interior french drain.
A lelftover of that project was the idea of a extra deep sump & pump to lower the water table futher under the house.
figuring a lower pump might decrease the chance of water infiltration. in my experience interior french drains work great
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french perimeter drain goes to sump and pump or ideally by gravity to daylight if the home sits high enough.
I had a home with a bad water problem:(
Heres what I did unsuccessfully:(.
Exterior perimeter drain at footer level, regraded complete lawn, replaced sidewalks and steps, all new downspout drains going to street, lots of misc landscaping etc. all gravel in sidewalk areas alongside home. previous owner had tried and failed, found their drains and noted their tipping sidewalks. I was the laborer on this job it improved curb appeal a lot but 6 months later the water returned.
had interior french drain with sump and pump installed ended water problem.....
I wasted 8500 bucks and a summer of hard labor, although the outside looked great
found out later there was a stream thru this area, all the surrounding homes had water troubles too.
conclusion...........
interior french drain is the least expensive and most effective solution.
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Bob F wrote:

I had the thought of acidic condensate too, but that is from a condensing furnace or boiler. Condensate from an A/C evaporator should be pretty pure water.
I had the thought of acidic condensate too, but that is from a condensing furnace or boiler. Rereading the post, the HW heater is not likely condensing, and condensate from an A/C evaporator should be pretty pure water.
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I have 6 pits and pumps in one building and a few more, none are really ever dry at the bottom, maybe over the winter they dry. Id be more worried about dirt getting in so gravel and a screen work. Just pour in some bleach if it ever gets smelly. Holes top down will let in the most water and all around since you are draining dirt not a flowing pipe with alot of volume. Yoy want to lower the water table so the lowest will hopefully help
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