Where to buy a single piece of straight wire?

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On 04/22/2013 03:44 PM, Steve W. wrote:

my thought too but a bike brake cable is going to be very limp. But if the OP can make that work that seems more OEM-like...
nate
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Nate Nagel wrote:

As long as the ferules are clamped to the proper points and the cable is adjusted the flex in the rest of the cables length won't matter.
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Generic lawnmower throttle cables are available just about everywhere you can get lawnmower parts, big box home improvement places, hardware stores, outdoor power equipment joints, etc. If you insist on making your own, Ace hardware carries a line of short music wire pieces, 18" and 36". I've run into the galloping idle on lawnmowers, it's usually a fan governor with a stretched-out spring or one hooked up wrong(AND stretched-out because of that). Lots of ways of governing a small engine, of course.
Stan
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On Mon, 22 Apr 2013 17:08:38 +0000 (UTC), John Doe

For pulling or for pushing?
Either way, find a junk bicycle and use the brake or shifter cables and sheath. If for pushing, you have to clamp the sheath in place close to the end.
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    Hmm ... can you use some of the trimmer string itself? Depends on whether the cable is under tension all the time or has to push, I guess.
    Is there a piano repairman in town? If so, ask him for strings which he has replaced.

    Good Luck,         DoN.
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To straighten thin wire. Fix one end in the vice. Put the other end in a drill chuck and pull as hard as you can. Briefly start the drill. Don't try this on wire so thick that you can't resist the torque.
This also hardens the wire and makes it stiffer.
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On Mon, 22 Apr 2013 23:12:20 -0700 (PDT), harry

Hardens it, yes. Makes it stiffer, no.
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Ed Huntress

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Ed Huntress wrote:

Hi, Go to hobby shop and get a piece of piano wire.
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wrote:
(snip)

Well... yes, that is correct if you use the technical definition of "stiffer". In the vernacular when applied to wire, "stiffer" usually means harder to put a permanent bend in it.
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On Tue, 23 Apr 2013 22:52:45 -0700, "anorton"

Right. But the vernacular can mean either. A lot of people believe that one equals the other -- that a wire that better resists bending also better resists springing.
It's a misconception that one person or another on this NG has to correct for someone every couple of months or so; not to be wise guys, but to help metalworking hobbyists understand a physical property of metal that often is misunderstood.
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harry <harry130747 btinternet.com> wrote:

That's interesting IMO.
FWIW... I usually adjust the torque setting, so it's usually not a problem. Like when doing stuff that requires little torque, I put the drill on the lowest torque setting, as a safety measure.
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On Mon, 22 Apr 2013 17:08:38 +0000 (UTC), John Doe

Why not just go to an automotive store and buy a universal choke cable. They are made to add a manual choke to any of the old carburetor cars, when the automatic choke becomes troublesome. I've used them myself. They are just a complete cable with a knob on one end and a mounting bracket to mount under your dash. If the auto parts stores dont have them anymore, try a tractor parts store. Many tractors used manual chokes and may still do.
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On Monday, April 22, 2013 1:08:38 PM UTC-4, John Doe wrote:

local store. Maybe it can be a plastic wire. It is for lengthening the thr ottle cable on a grass trimmer that I'm using for a project. I tried straig htening a wire, but it needs to be perfectly straight so that it doesn't ac t like a spring. Under stress, the engine sputters rhythmically. I'm sure i t's the wire acting like a spring. Then I will need to find a sheath, but I will go for the wire first. Thanks.
Hobby shop will also have sheathed control cable for model planes. In meta l and plastic. It has very little play as that would be problem on a plane control surface.
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On Monday, April 22, 2013 12:08:38 PM UTC-5, John Doe wrote:

www.cccables.com
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On 4/22/2013 12:08 PM, John Doe wrote:

You can purchase straight wire at Fred's Heterosexual Wire company. ^_^
freds-nogaywire.com
TDD
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On 4/22/2013 12:08 PM, John Doe wrote:

local weld shop. Get a stick of bare brazing or welding rod.
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