Where to buy a single piece of straight wire?

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I need something like a guitar string, about 18 inches. Preferably from a local store.
Maybe it can be a plastic wire.
It is for lengthening the throttle cable on a grass trimmer that I'm using for a project. I tried straightening a wire, but it needs to be perfectly straight so that it doesn't act like a spring. Under stress, the engine sputters rhythmically. I'm sure it's the wire acting like a spring.
Then I will need to find a sheath, but I will go for the wire first.
Thanks.
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On Mon, 22 Apr 2013 17:08:38 +0000 (UTC), John Doe

Find a hobby shop that has straight lengths of music wire. It's used by model-airplane folks. It's typically available in diameters ranging from 0.006" or so up to 1/8". Over 1/8, it's technically not music wire, but hobby shops may have thicker pieces.
It's plain-carbon steel; extremely strong (from 100,000 psi tensile to well over 200,000 psi) and it rusts like hell, so you'll need to coat it.
--
Ed Huntress

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On Monday, April 22, 2013 12:08:38 PM UTC-5, John Doe wrote:

A hobby shop should have an assortment of "music wire" in various sizes, it's tough stuff.
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On 4/22/2013 10:08 AM, John Doe wrote:

You're saying that when you grab the throttle tab on the engine and hold it steady, the sputter goes away?

Or get the wire and sheath as a bicycle brake cable. I'm betting neither solves your problem.
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I'm going to try 1/16" (or so) diameter nylon string. If that causes the same sputtering that is probably due to some sort of throttle system oscillation, or if it stretches too much, I will carefully moisten it with superglue in order to stiffen it while it is under tension, and try again.
If that doesn't work, a hobby shop is nearby.
--
Thanks to the replies, and any that might be in the queue.

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On Monday, April 22, 2013 10:08:38 AM UTC-7, John Doe wrote:

Hobby shops and real hardware stores sell piano wire, which is steel wire, usually in straight 36" lengths.
Bicycle, motorcycle, and hobby shops sell push-pull cables for controlling stuff like throttles and brakes, and they come sheathed. The cables inside are flexible, but the sheath can keep them very stiff.
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larrymoencurly my-deja.com wrote:

Not that matters, but...
Being a push-pull cable would be even more difficult to extend. In this case, I think the carburetor tension is significantly more than the hand throttle tension pulling in the other direction, so the cable is always being pulled in only one direction, fortunately.
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McMaster or Amazon

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On 04/22/2013 03:14 PM, Bob La Londe wrote:

I've used real piano wire from a music store to make my own Bowden cables before in a pinch.
you say "like a guitar string" you know those are cheap too right?
nate
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John Doe wrote:

Doesn't sound like a cable problem unless the engine/carb can flex relative to the throttle control.
If you want a good cable just hit a bike shop. That gives you easily modified cable with protective sheath. As long as the ends of the sheath are secured to the respective control areas the motions of the cable will have no impact on engine stability.
What it sounds more like is that you are running the engine lean or under a load that it cannot handle.
--
Steve W.

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Even though I know little about gasoline engines, those are the two thoughts I first had, but... Everything else is the same as when it was running fine, before extending the throttle cable with a slightly crooked wire. In my view, some sort of feedback caused by a springy throttle wire (that causes sputtering) is the best lead. It is easy to try and it should be obvious if it is.
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I replaced the throttle extension cable with a 3/32" nylon string.
Or the ignition kill switch wire might have been shorting. I suppose that could have been rhythmic. Trying to rev the engine might have caused the shorting. I suppose that could have caused an oscillation.
In any case, now the acceleration is normal and smooth, no sputtering.
I'm aware of the need for a fuel stabilizer.
Thanks to the replies.
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What is that a picture of?????
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It's my current push stick for inline street skating.
To get a very clear idea, you can see similar devices in action on my Youtube playlist.

http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLDE35AFC2C3114647

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On Tue, 23 Apr 2013 02:12:38 +0000 (UTC), John Doe

I use ski poles.
And I loved my Coyotes..until someone decided they liked em more than me.....shrug
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Gunner Asch <gunnerasch gmail.com> wrote:

They look good and they are definitely good for adding upper body exercise. I used a pair of trekking poles until they were destroyed, now the aluminum is being used. Every once in awhile, a carbide tip got caught in a sidewalk crack. If I didn't release the stick instantly, the tip was damaged. Eventually the end was destroyed.
The push stick isn't for exercise, it's for fun and for getting from here to there. Street skating is outrageous fun. Manual pushing is not part of the fun. Basically, pushing sucks when you're not trying to get exercise.

My big front wheel skates are better than Coyotes for rough terrain. Big wheels are great, but you only need a big wheel in front. The only thing that big trailing wheels do is raise your center of balance, that's not good. Yesterday when I took my most recent GoTail (inline skating push stick) out for a test run, somebody stuck their head out the car window and started asking me about the big front wheels on my skates. I get comments on them more than anything else so far.
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On Mon, 22 Apr 2013 20:15:48 +0000 (UTC), John Doe

for the job.
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Agree with Steve. The problem is not the wire, it's the gas/air mixture and there should be an adjustment for that where the gas and air come together before they go into the engine. That used to be inside a device called a carburetor; but maybe it's called something else on that type of engine.
Tomsic
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On 4/22/2013 3:32 PM, Tomsic wrote:

valve in the carburetor curls up and leaks.
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On 4/22/2013 3:44 PM, Steve W. wrote:

--
Jeff

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