Where is a "safe place" to dispose of 14 oz. propane tanks?

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mm wrote:

Harbor Freight sells 'em. I've had one for years and refill my Bernz-O-Matic style propane torch bottles from a grille tank using it.
IIRC there was some note that came with it saying something about not taking refilled bottles across state lines.
I'm careful not to "overfill" those bottles I weighed a "full" newly purchased one abd don't refill to any more weight than that.
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
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On Sun, 24 Feb 2008 17:00:40 -0500, Jeff Wisnia

A) Could it fill more than that? If the pressure when new in the small tank is as much as the pressure in the large on when new (is it?), how could you fill the small one to any higher pressure (and weight)?
B) Do you have that kind of control? Obviously you think you do, but I'm surprised unless it fills slowly. I thought there would be no orifices in the hose, just a full size opening.

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mm wrote:

If the large (grille) tank has been sitting outside in warm weather and you put the small tank in the kitchen freezer for a while before filling it, as mentioned in the instructions which came with the HF adaptor, then there WILL be a pressure difference, at least until the small tank gets as warm as the large tank.
I'm not saying that I ever actually "overfilled" a small tank that way. I was just being curious and cautious and decided to weigh the refilled tanks to be on the safe side. I realize that the Schraeder valve would open and let gas vent out if the tank was totally filled with liquid and subjected to a temperature increase, but that's not something I want happening in my house. <G>

No small orifices, (and no hose either on the refiller I've got) but you can "crack" the large tank's valve to regulate the liquid flow.
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
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On Mon, 25 Feb 2008 11:38:43 -0500, Jeff Wisnia

Thanks
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hey ship all the used tanks to me, i will take them all for free, disable them and sell for scrap weekly.
nice side income:)
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A new propane tank is mostly full of liquid. As you draw propane gas off the top, some of the liquid boils to replenish the liquid, and the pressure in the top part of the tank is the vapour pressure of propane at the current temperature.
Now, if you refill this at your local propane supplier, he'll use a pump that provides more pressure than the vapour pressure of propane. This is enough to re-liquefy the propane left in the tank, plus add a bunch more liquid propane. If the operator's not careful, an old-style propane tank can be filled 100% full of liquid, with no gas space. This is an explosion hazard, because any temperature rise will cause the safety valve to open or, if it fails, actually generate thousands of PSI and split the tank.
The refill operator is *supposed* to weigh the tank on a scale and stop when the tank plus propane weight indicates that the tank still contains about 20% gas. The newer tanks with OPD valves actually have a little float that shuts off the liquid flow when the liquid level gets as high as the float.
Now, when you're refilling a small tank from a large one, you don't have the mechanical pump, but you can still generate higher pressure in the large tank than the small one by a difference in temperature. And you can still fill the little tank 100% full of liquid under some circumstances.
    Dave
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I'm not sure why you say "the web is no help".
A Google search returned many hits regarding the disposal of propane tanks. The vast majority of the hits differentiate the disposal of tanks larger than 2 pounds vs. the disposable "Coleman" size.
These words, stolen without permission from http://www.govlink.org/hazwaste/house/products/AnyProduct.cfm?entityID=965&catID=945 , seem to be pretty consistant with what I found at other sites:
Butane and propane tanks
Proper disposal Empty gas canisters less than two pounds (such as the small Coleman camping canisters) may be placed in the garbage. Larger canisters, up to five gallons (barbecue size), either empty or containing gas need to be taken to one of the household hazardous waste facilities. For approval of tanks larger than five gallons in (barbecue) size, call the Household Hazards Line at 206-296-4692 for more information.
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Shoot a hole in them and then put them out in the trash. Those guys don't look at what's in the bags.
Steve
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wrote:

Now where did I put my gun? The kids must have it. They never put things back where they're supposed to be.

Thanks for all the answers. This was a better question than I thought it was.
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mm wrote:

humor....
aem sends...
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Yes, shooting them is a lot of fun.
Steve
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mm wrote:

Reuse is better than recycle or discard.
Here's a gizmo that allows you to refill them from a big propane tank.
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?ItemnumberE989
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I have one of those.
I found that they do not fill to little tank to anywhere near full. They always seem to run out a lot faster. So if you don't mind carrying around ~twice as many as you might otherwise, or refilling them pretty often, it's an OK device.
The instructions say not to refill any containers showing rust, so eventually you'll have to dispose of them anyway. Another issue is the moisture content of the propane which may rust the container from the inside. This is an older discussion, but it dicusses both the moisture issue and the transport of refilled containers. Maybe the rules have changed since it was written...
http://yarchive.net/car/rv/disposable_propane.html
When I go camping, I take my big tank with a T and 2 long hoses - one for the grill and one for the stove. Saves bucks deluxe over buying the disposable tanks.
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wrote:

I have one of those.
I found that they do not fill to little tank to anywhere near full. They always seem to run out a lot faster. So if you don't mind carrying around ~twice as many as you might otherwise, or refilling them pretty often, it's an OK device.
The instructions say not to refill any containers showing rust, so eventually you'll have to dispose of them anyway. Another issue is the moisture content of the propane which may rust the container from the inside. This is an older discussion, but it dicusses both the moisture issue and the transport of refilled containers. Maybe the rules have changed since it was written...
http://yarchive.net/car/rv/disposable_propane.html
When I go camping, I take my big tank with a T and 2 long hoses - one for the grill and one for the stove. Saves bucks deluxe over buying the disposable tanks.
This thread has gone round and round before. Bottom line, is that personal use tanks are not subject to the laws of commercially transported cargo. And yes, I, too have a hose that lets me hook up to a big tank for my camping devices, and those last two forevers.
I tried freezing the canisters before filling, made a special rack to hold the old style tank upside down thinking that it would run liquid in instead of vapor. And I found that they only filled 1/3 to 1/2 full at best. They don't work as advertised.
Steve
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put doner tank in freezer before refilling, a buddy does that helps them to fill better.
i have reused some for other uses. left sit for a week with torch valve open outside. a buddy suggested putting it on a vacuumn pump but thats overkill if you asked me.
drilled out valve, puped with compressed air they can be handy for clean ups, like bottled air.
added 2 to a small piston compressor for reserve capacity used for many years. replaced with a rubber bladder i guess bigger HP compressor that works better and weighs a fraction of the old one.
dont think in the box, the box isnt your friend.
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I suspect you mean "donor" which is the source tank.
The rest of your advice sounds unsafe.
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Christopher A. Young
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i know upside don is greater flow, will ask a buddy if heating gently a full 20 pound tank would get more into a smaller one
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Actually, I used the refiller pre OPD gas tanks. I don't even know if the ones with OPD would flow any gas out if upside down.
I have seen some LPG devastation, and I'd just as not apply heat to a tank, thank you.
Steve
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wrote:

Very clever, even if it didn't work.
I drove over a chrome strip and put a hole in my gas tank. I smelled it when I got to work, but I thought that was because I worked in a steel mill. A guy who came up behind me said I had gasoline pouring out.
A co-worker took me out at lunch and bought an epoxee kit especially for gas tanks. Hot july day, hardened before I was done. Drove home anyhow, stopping every 5 or 10 miles to buy another gallon of gasoline. I think I stopped 5 times, in 25 miles.
Bought another kit and the next morning I put it in the freezer for 10? minutes to give me more time to put it on. The extra time was a big help and the patch lasted 3 years.
Had the car painted, and it leaked the day I got the car from the painter. I'm pretty sure because of the vapors there, but the second patch also failed after 3 years with no paint shop invovled.

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SteveB wrote:

Probably because the little tanks are designed for greater pressure than the big tanks.
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