Where do the electrical wires run in a wall?

Hi,
I want to build a dog kennel next to my house, and then put a doggie door through the wall to the kennel, so my dogs can go in and out on their own. How can I determine if there are any electrical wires or conduit in the way, before I make the cut? (this is a 50-year-old ranch house, if it makes any difference).
Thanks
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You can buy a very inexpensive EMF tester at Home Depot that can tell you if there is a live wire behind the drywall.
Alternatively, if you are going to put a door there regardless of whether there is a wire or not, you can cut away the drywall with a drywall saw, which is very dull and has a hard time going through Romex (if it is Romex). An alternative to that is to use the drywall saw but with a very shallow cut so that you don't strike the wire, if it's there.
My guess is that there is no wire down at the level of the doggy door, depending, of course, on how high you intend to make that door.
Good luck. H

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50 year old home probaly has plaster, even lath and plaster.
best bet is attempt to find studs cut gently test hole in wall check for obstructions like water sewer telephone, firestops, etc etc.
dog doors are wonderful having installed a couple best bet is probably under window, that elminates many utilities like water and sewer.
test hole is safest using hammer bash small hole in perspective area look inside. chances are good you will be fine. best to start inside, easier to repair damage if you foind unhally surprise.
the reason i recommend hammer it cant damage wiring.
we installed door then fenced in yard, no fdogt walking needed, no door opening, etc etc.
dogs can go outside when they want, happer healthier furry friends.
self toileting too.
dog doors are wonderful, once you get one you will never go back.
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FYI - "Gypsum Board" as we know it has been around since 1913, and was used in over 50% of homes built in 1955.
http://www.wconline.com/CDA/Articles/Column/090578779d768010VgnVCM100000f932a8c0____
But it still could be lath/plaster since the other 50% were.
H

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I got one at Wal-Mart for $5. It claimed it was a "holiday light tester", but it was actually an EMF detector (I wish they'd said so).

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On Sun, 13 Aug 2006 15:15:24 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@tds.net wrote:

Cut a small hole about the size of an outlet in the center of where the doggy door will be. Reach in and feel the wires or conduit (which I doubt you have). You can then move the wires or conduit quite easily.
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If there is an outlet on each side of the area that you want to install the doggie door than there is a good possibility that there may be a wire or conduit crossing your path. If you have a basement take a look under the intended area to see if any water pipes, ducts, or wires go through the floor there.
If there is a cable in your way, it is possible to cut it and mount an outlet on each side of the doggie door and run a cable in between them above or below your new door. An electrical conduit can be more difficult, but not impossible to relocate. A professional electrician should be able to take care of it for you.
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