Where can someone buy Outdoor phone wire

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No you cannot. On a 4 PAIR cable you can. (8 conductor -Cat5.
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On 9/5/2012 11:57 PM, Larry wrote:

Maybe you mean 4 pair? And wiring split pairs used to be what was done to cut corners in the past but I haven't seen anything wired new like that in a long time because it kills the ability to use GbE.
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How would split pair wiring impact the monitoring of health by the German government?
http://www.acronymfinder.com/GBE.html
Gesundheitsberichterstattung des Bundes (German: Federal Health Monitoring System)
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On 9/6/2012 3:08 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

It wouldn't. First abbreviation on your reference was:
GbE    Gigabit Ethernet (IEEE 802.3z-1998)
Note the lower case "b".
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Ginkgo Biloba Extrakt?
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I can't help with the overhead wire, but I'm pretty sure you can pick up direct burial phone cable from the home centers. It's usually in the big rack of wire that is cut to length, not in prepackaged rolls.
You also might ask your phone company. Years ago my phone company gave me a few hundred feet at no charge.

As another poster mentioned, get a "cordless" phone. Ours reach 250' easily so it should cover your distance OK. Depending on where you place the base unit, you may be able to improve that range.
Take care,
Anthony Watson Home Cookin Recipe Software www.mountain-software.com
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On Tuesday, August 28, 2012 2:30:34 AM UTC-7, (unknown) wrote:

http://www.graybar.com/locations
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
-snip-

+1 on Graybar
Thanks for posting that. I couldn't think of their name to save my soul, but I know where 2 of them are.<g>
Jim
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On 8/28/2012 9:40 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

You beat me to Graybar, one of the things I do is sell and install phone systems and I've purchased quite a bit of stuff from Graybar over the years. ^_^
TDD
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/where-can-someone-buy-outdoor-phone-wire-711531-.htm DA wrote:
fred.flintstone wrote:

So, did you get an actual quote or an open-ended $90/hr (or whatever the current going rate is) offer? I would not want to entertain an open-ended one, but if you did manage to get a quote, I'd seriously consider it.
Buried cable is much safer than aerial and properly installing an aerial cable is also not a walk in a park. The utility company will not let you use their pole and will fine you if you did it illegally. It also appears that you don't have poles high enough to go over the driveway at the height you need. The cable will exert pulling force on any structure you attach it to, and you'd have to calculate whether it will actually hold it, especially if there's any ice and wind load.
For an aerial cable you will have to have two protector boxes on either end, and for a buried one it's plausible that you won't need it (depends on how the garage and the workshop are positioned and the height of the roof of each structure)
So, yeah, I would seriously consider a buried cable installation quote - a properly installed aerial may not be so cheap either.
--

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On Tuesday, August 28, 2012 1:00:01 PM UTC-4, DA wrote:

you'd have to calculate whether it will actually hold it, especially if there's any ice and wind load.
Baloney.
I've watched installers at work and they just hammer a hook into the nearest wood structure they can find. There's no calculating involved.
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On 8/28/2012 11:00 AM, DA wrote:

and for a buried one it's plausible that you won't need it (depends on how the garage and the workshop are positioned and the height of the roof of each structure)

You should still install them for underground. For instance if there is a lightning strike to a tree near the workshop, the earth (and earthing systems) at the workshop and house may be many thousands of volts different.
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On 8/29/2012 4:43 PM, bud-- wrote:

Underground doesn't make a difference if there is the typical significant difference in potential you describe because it typically toasts whatever is connected to each side even with protectors.
If you want immunity from replacing stuff in July during peak thunderstorms fiber or wireless is the way to go.
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Stick the line in metal conduit. End of problem.
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On 8/29/2012 4:39 PM, David Kaye wrote:

That doesn't help much in practice because the high difference in potential between the two buildings is what toasts the devices on either or both ends of the copper.
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On 8/29/2012 2:35 PM, George wrote:

Wireless and fiber certainly eliminate many problems but surge protection is not that difficult. You treat the underground wire at both ends like you would tread an overhead service from the phone company.
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On 8/31/2012 9:22 AM, bud-- wrote:

It is next to impossible to totally protect against surges with the exception of simply not allowing for a very large difference in potential to matter such as by using fiber.
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On 8/31/2012 6:44 AM, George wrote:

I don't think it is particularly difficult, and lots of people protect against surges. For instance large parts of Florida.
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Grainger to the rescue once again. Here's a good place to start: http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/communication-cables/data-and-communication/electrical/ecatalog/N-8b0?Ndrsedimid10071&sst=subset
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Per snipped-for-privacy@thecave.com:

Here's a variation on that one: look into cordless phones. Some of the name brands are pretty cheap when on sale. How many of them will do 300 feet is another question... but I'd at least look. And maybe the base station could be located in the house such as to reduce the 300'...
If there is no AC in the shed, have a couple of handsets to alternate on the charger in the house.
--
Pete Cresswell

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