Where can I get parts for 12V battery charger

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wrote:

It has nothing to do with my eyes. I might get a little "snow" on my analog tv, but snow is far less irritating than all those huge blotches and distortions on a HDTV when the signal is not 100%. Since I live in a rural area, and am many miles from the tv station, everyone around here has these poor pictures. Even on a DVD movie the picture is artificial looking. I just dont like HDTV. But what the heck. The government takes most of our money, they may as well take away our tvs too.
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I think you have some oddball bias that piggy backs on not having all correct information.
1) The government isn't forcing High Def. They're forcing digital. Not all digital is high def. They also not forcing you to buy a new TV. True, you'll need a converter for analog TVs that still are using OTA reception (if that's still you, you're in the vast minority), but it's not like you need to drop 2 grand on a new TV.
2) You don't need 100% signal for digital. There are also alternatives to picking it up OTA if you live too many miles from the station, including cable, or if you're still too far away from that, satellite. Now, I find it interesting that you complain about digital signals when you don't have digital service. Odd.
3) If you're basing your experience on friends, I've known MANY people that have their TVs set up COMPLETELY wrong. I dated this one chick that had a nice new 50" Sony HDTV, the Comcast guy hooked up the HD box, but she had it on the wrong input, and was still only receiving an analog-SD picture from the box. I clicked a couple of buttons on her TV, and I though her head was going to explode with the huge increased resolution change.
So what part of the HDTV picture don't you like? The increased resolution? The greater dynamic range of black vs. white? Increased color depth?
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So how is MS forcing you into a new operating system when you still happily use Win 98? I mean, you're using a 10 year old OS. Home PCs have only been around for 25 years or so.
What do you expect companies to do, stop developing the products they make? Should GM still be making a '57 Chevy? Should we all still have rotary telephones, using 300 baud modems? Still have tube black and white TVs?
Until Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, or Jack Tretton hold a gun to your head, they're not forcing you to do anything, as you've proven with your use of Win 98 and a standard def TV.
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snipped-for-privacy@notmail.com writes:

Correction: broadcasters are being required to switch from analog transmission (which is very wasteful of radio spectrum once you consider the rules about adjacent channels (due to crappy UHF tuners)) to digital transmission which uses less spectrum. The broadcasters may use that to transmit HDTV, or multiple channels of game shows and reruns.
Your TV will continue to work fine playing content from your VCR or DVD player. If you want content off the air, you'll need an adapter box. But nothing forces you to buy a new TV.
    Dave
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Nice 'clip', thereby missing the whole point of my humor.
Bob
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I don't know about the rest of the world, but I consider almost all those chargers throw-a-ways.

--
Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
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Joseph Meehan wrote:

I have a beefy charger that I have been using for years that I got because it was declared inoperable. It had blown stud diodes and it was a quick repair.
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That is true. While I would expect someone with three of those commercial units would not be sitting on three of them out of commission and not repairing or having them repaired or at least having someone in the shop that would know the answer to the question. Of course some very old ones might require more redesign and expense to make it worth it. I would not expect three of them to go out at the same time.
The OP appears to understand enough about them, that I am surprised he did not know where to get the parts.

--
Joseph Meehan

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Of those 3, one was originally my own. The other 2 came from auctions where I gave a couple bucks for them. The reason I can not just change parts from one to the other is that they are all different amperages. The thermal breaker needs to be a 12A (its a 2 or 10A charger). None of the other chargers are even close, they are much higher AMP chargers. I cant use the diodes from the 10A on a 50A or I think the other one is a 20 to 30A. This is where the problems arise. Getting parts these days is very difficult. Even when you do find them online, many (or most) companies want a minimum order and or charge very high shipping making the whole repair cost more than a new charger. I did find one place that has the thermal breakers, except they dont have a 12A. I have to choose either a 10 or 15, which means a 15 or it will trip all the time at full charge. The part is around four dollars. For some reason their shipping would not calculate on the web which means I have to call them tomorrow, but I already have a feeling the shipping will be $10 or more, which will make me ask myself if it's worth the cost. (the item weighs .7 oz, so the real shipping should be about $2). And I am not sure if they have a minimum either.....
What ever happened to the good old days when every city had a well stocked electronics parts store? I recall them in the 60's and spent a good amount of time and money at them, when I was in my teens.
-----------------
On Sun, 28 Oct 2007 17:46:30 -0400, "Joseph Meehan"

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I suspect that UPS Ground from DigiKey to most locations in the US would be about $4 for their smallest size box and minimal content. Plus a $5 handling charge if your order is less than $25 or something like that. They may charge "UPS Chart Rate" but get a big discount, which they pocket to defray cost of the package, packing material, and doing the packaging and also a bit of profit. Their parts prices are so low that I see their markup over full "standard package" per-unit prices barely covering cost of repackaging into smaller quantities and only some of the other costs of getting them from a "standard package FOB manufacturer" to your package of parts.
They have a highly automated system for that. It would cost them more after cost of extra labor to send your package by first class mail instead, probably at about $2 for postage. I have an impression that their smallest box with packing material weighs about 5 ounces, plus the weight of the merchandise. The automated system requires a small variety of box sizes for the bulk of their shipments to minimize cost.

1. Electronics has largely been offshored by higher USA labor costs (including labor overhead or USA-specific extra employee expense such as health insurance at USA bloated healthcare cost rate, and auto insurance), higher liability and liability insurance costs, and more-expensive-to- comply-with workplace safety and environmental regulations. Have you seen yet fire extinguishers with a flammability rating? I first started seeing those around 2004 or so. For that matter, I think the rule book would get fatter rather than thinner to get fire extinguishers an exemption from whatever chemical product regulation gave us this!
So, there is little electronic prodct or electronic component manufacturing in the USA now. I suspect a lot of DigiKey's customers are hobbyists, prototype developers, consultants and specialty small job manufacturers making a small quantity of actual products, and the small remainder of actual electronic product manufacturers in the US, and a few manufacturers of products that use a few loose electronic components (as opposed to entire circuit boards). I suspect DigiKey also has some Canadian customers including product manufacturers.
2. The local parts stores can't compete against DigiKey in any way except by getting parts to you today rather than tomorrow.
DigiKey even goes a bit of the way there by accepting online orders as late as 8 PM Central time and getting them to you the next morning.
Mouser is also doing some of what DigiKey does. The other main electronic components distributors as far as I know are Allied-Newark, Future Electronics, and Jameco. There are a few hobbyist/surplus type places, and the ones that come to my mind most are Hosfelt, BG MIcro and All Electronics. There are some local ones, but they are dying out to such an extent that not every city in the US has one.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Seriously, you must live in a dream world. There are very few servicable parts inside electronics now. In the 60's, you'd be lucky to have a few transistors in a device, and probably 90% of the components were capacitors and resistors. Which is why anything you bought took up half your living room.
Cut to the 2000s, where your entire life can be kept on a phone that neatly fits into your shirt pocket. A device that has a few tiny surface mount components which never go bad, and 2 or 3 ICs that also last forever (unless the phone happens to fall into the toilet!)
I'm all for fixing and tinkering, but we're in the very small minority. I fixed a home DVD player which happened to have a cap go bad (poor design, under rated component, as it was a common problem with this certain model). Of course, when the DVD player initially went bad, I bought a new one. One with some new great features (like the ability to play MPG and AVIs off a standard CD or DVD ROM), for $40. It took me longer to research the problem with the old DVD player, dig a cap out of my supply, and solder the new one in than it took to go to Best Buy and pick up my new fangled DVD player.
You don't HAVE to fix stuff now, because the replacement is dirt cheap to buy. While bad for the land fills, it's a GOOD thing for pretty much everything else.
On top of that, you STILL have electronic supply sources.. HUGE sources like DigiKey (my favorite) that ship out within 24 hours. Sometimes I get the stuff the next day.
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wrote:
[snip]

Just today I got a Wal-Mart ad that included a $30 DVD player.

I need those sometimes, such as for the solid-state relays I use in my holiday light control system (it also took a few 78L05 and MAX233 ICs and some capacitors).
--
57 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
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Also, Fry's if you happen to have one nearby.
Bob
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On Oct 28, 5:09 am, snipped-for-privacy@notmail.com wrote:

You locale?
In OC, CA (or SoCal) ..... Marvac electronics
online...... as Ed suggested............
temp fix....as suggest rob all the parts need from the others
btw that would be a thermal circuit breaker
cheers Bob
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American Science and Surplus www.sciplus.com has some strange things like diodes. A lot of fun to look at the web site, also.
--

Christopher A. Young
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< snipped-for-privacy@notmail.com> wrote in message
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