Where can I get boot leather for my wife's boot heel?

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On Wed, 08 Jul 2015 04:16:22 +0000, HerHusband wrote:

The tire-changing tool costs about $100 or so. Each tire (out here) costs about $20 to change at the shop. So, after one full set of tires, the tool has paid for itself.
That's not a bad return for your money for a tool.
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On Thu, 9 Jul 2015 07:16:31 +0000 (UTC), Karlheinz Fenstermacher

That's a manual tool. A lot of work. and I'm not convinced it's safe from hitting oneself with the tire iron or pinching somewhere. Some times the guy can barely remove or replace the tire with a pneumatic tool.

Why would I change s full set of tires. That means I have to shop by mail, find some place to take the old tires.
What I do is buy used tires. Usually about 20 or 30 each, inluding replacing on the rim, dynamic balancing, and replacing on the car.
The place I go to normally has me in and out in under 5 minutes. Literally 5 minutes, never more than 10. from the time I drive up until I drive away. Rarely any waiting time

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On 07/09/2015 03:00 AM, micky wrote:

Freaky fast!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v4NctrMmyX8

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On 07/09/2015 01:16 AM, Karlheinz Fenstermacher wrote:

I change my own tube type motorcycle tires. The spoons cost about $15 iirc. However, I get the tubeless type done at a shop. Why? Because I don't have a high volume air compressor to seat the beads on a tubeless tire. Sometimes it's no problem. Other times it's a major pita.
Did you include the cost of a high volume air source?
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On Tue, 7 Jul 2015 15:59:29 +0000 (UTC), Karlheinz Fenstermacher

There is a guy on ebay that sells all kinds of leather. He uses the store name "The Leather Guy". I have done business with him and was satisfied.
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On Mon, 6 Jul 2015 21:18:22 +0000 (UTC), Karlheinz Fenstermacher

Have you tried Google?
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On Mon, 06 Jul 2015 17:21:56 -0500, Gordon Shumway wrote:

I wanted to speak with someone who actually replaced the heel (who wasn't at the same time trying to sell me something).
I can imagine there are good and back types of leather, and particularly good places to get leather.
For example, I took apart a catcher's mitt and still have *that* leather, but, it's too thin.
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On Tue, 7 Jul 2015 16:01:05 +0000 (UTC), Karlheinz Fenstermacher

Absolutely, and too soft.
My mother recovered desk chairs, including unscrewing the seat, recovering, screwing them back on.
I came across a big piece of leather once and saved it and used it eventually to recover the back of a swivel desk chair. Other parts of the chair have worn out and had to be repaired, but the leather back is still good after about 30 years. I'm sitting in the chair right now. And I think I've done other things with other leather scraps, but shoes and their heels are under far greater strain than most things.
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On Mon, 06 Jul 2015 15:40:51 -0700, Uncle Monster wrote:

This is a great idea, and is the type of idea I was hoping to get.
The bicycle tire is just a tad too small to fit around the heel of this boot, as it's a cowboy type, but the idea is sound.
I was thinking about the rubber of a car inner tube, which is a bit too soft, but certainly it will do in a pinch for the rubber layer on the bottom.
I went through my leather pile, after autopsying an old catcher's mitt and assorted and sundry shoes, and there was an old boot (another pair) that I may cannibalize the upper leather of, but again, it's thinner than the heel leather.
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On Tue, 07 Jul 2015 10:02:47 -0700, Uncle Monster wrote:

That's also a GREAT IDEA!
In fact, I have a flat wheelbarrow tire at the moment, that I was going to replace. I just needed to remove it and take it to Home Depot to get the right replacement.
You are correct. The Wheelbarrow tire will be easy to cut, and the right thickness. I love that idea. I will see if the treads can be sanded down on my belt sander.
Thanks!
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If you got your wheelbarrow at HD, call the manufacturer. Wheel replacements are free, but they are not done in the store.
--
Dan Espen

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On Tue, 7 Jul 2015 10:02:47 -0700 (PDT), Uncle Monster

If you make a heel out of that, will the wearer have greater traction? Will she be good in snow and mud?
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On Tue, 07 Jul 2015 09:02:43 -0700, Col. Edmund J. Burke wrote:

Dupree is a *male* dominant! http://collarspace.com/dupree
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