Where can I get boot leather for my wife's boot heel?

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My wife's boot heel is worn through the rubber to the leather. If I replace the last layer of leather on the heel (it's pretty thick as there are about 10 layers, so I'd guess 1/8th inch) and the rubber pad, I'd be a hero.
Where can we mail order this thick boot heel leather and rubber pads to cut to size?
Any experience repairing boot heels?
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On 07/06/2015 04:18 PM, Karlheinz Fenstermacher wrote:

If you want to be a real hero take it to a good shoe repair shop and have it done right.
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On 7/6/2015 6:16 PM, philo wrote:

+1
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On Mon, 06 Jul 2015 17:16:04 -0500, philo wrote:

I'm dismayed with that answer.
How many of you here are wholly incapable of replacing a boot heel, such that you've never done it?
Isn't this a *repair* group? Don't you "repair" things?
I guess it's not "home" repair, pe se, so you guys must be all into contruction, I guess, so I apologize for asking here.
Looking around for a real repair group, I only saw scientific equipment repair, which this isn't.
Is there some other group that repairs stuff "in" the home that I can ask instead?
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Shoe repair requires special skills, special tools, and as you are finding out, a special source of repair materials.
Try a google search for "shoe repair supplies". I do see hits. Good luck.
--
Dan Espen

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On Tue, 07 Jul 2015 12:12:54 -0400, Dan Espen wrote:

I wouldn't call leather and rubber "special" tools.
I just need a good source, hopefully scavenged from somewhere (like an old catcher's mitt).
The wife loves it when I fix things without going to the store, but this one is going to be harder, since none of us have a simple three inch section of leather and rubber lying around the house anymore.
What has become of us. Have we all devolved into being *consumers* now? Nobody repairs anymore?
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Good thing I didn't refer to leather as a tool.
First you ask for a source for boot leather. No one has any answers, but you assert that the leather is not special.
Any boot heel I've seen is a chunk of hard rubber, or a stack of pretty thick leather all glued together. Google can find that stuff, but it won't be at Home Depot.

Some people go to shoe repair shops. Most just throw out their shoes when they break. You appear to be special. Good luck.
--
Dan Espen

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Which shows you know little about cobblers and have poor reading comprehension.
I assume you don't have a last. Or even know what a last is and what is used for. How do you intend to join your new heel to the shoe? pegs? nails? adhesive?

Have you tried thrift shops?

Silly questions. Particularly when based on responses from _this_ usenet group which contains mostly useless and poorly considered polemics.
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...as opposed to a stupid question and the OP's penchant for railing against those who can't help her?
This poster comes in asking for help, then slams the group cuz they don't know more than she does. Talk about troll bait.
nb
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On Tue, 07 Jul 2015 16:59:26 +0000, Scott Lurndal wrote:

That's a GREAT idea!
It's so good, that I wish I had thought of it myself.
I love it. Since I don't have "spare" parts lying around, the thrift shop becomes my salvage yard.
Thanks!
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On 07/07/2015 10:59 AM, Karlheinz Fenstermacher wrote:

I am pretty good when it comes to fixing things and usually do a fully functional (though not elegant) repair.
I'd sure you could fix your wife's shoe but I'd be surprised if your wife would like it.
There are still expert shoe repair craftsmen who would fix it 100% to your wife's satisfaction.
Just get it done right and it will save your marriage.
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On Tue, 7 Jul 2015 15:59:29 +0000 (UTC), Karlheinz Fenstermacher

Probably not.
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On Tue, 7 Jul 2015 15:59:29 +0000 (UTC), Karlheinz Fenstermacher

sci.electronics.repair alt.shoe.repair alt.sandal.repair alt.stiletto.repair
Don't judge the group by one answer. but otoh a shoe repairman will have the heel already and it will take him ten minutes to put it on (even though he will charge like it took longer. You would have to look all over the place just to find the heel that fits, or a right knife to cut a big one with.
Plus you say it needs leather too. I coudlnt' follow that. Leather under the rubber heel? I have no idea where you would get just the right leather to use there. Except at a shoe repair store, which might for a premium, sell you materials and let you try to do it yourself. I don't even consider paying for most repairs but shoe repair is a real trade and most know their stuff.

In my family we've been going to shoe repairmen for 70 years or more. We were damn poor until 1915 or 1930 (depending on which side of the family) so maybe not then or some of the 30 years after then. Like having the right tool for the job, having the right repairman for the job is also a good idea.
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Do a Google search for "cobbler supplies". You'll find a number of businesses online who sell supplies for repairing shoes; leather, new heels, etc. Of course, they usually sell to cobblers so you'll need to buy items in quantity.


Believe me, I am the guy who always tries to fix something myself rather than pay someone else to do it. Even if it takes longer or costs more, I do it for the knowledge and personal satisfaction. However, even for someone like me there's a point where the end goal isn't worth the effort.
For example, something like replacing tires on automobile wheels. Yeah, I could buy the tools and do it myself, but it's faster and cheaper to pay the shop to do it. I only need to do it once every few years, so it doesn't make sense to do it myself. It's one of the rare things I pay others to do.
Could I repair a shoe? Sure, with a little study and the right tools and supplies, I'm as capable as anyone. But by the time I've bought the tools, ordered the supplies, and learned how to use them, I could have bought new shoes for less money and a lot less effort.
While you can still find a cobbler (shoe repair person), it's not a big industry. In most cases, it's a small mom and pop shop that have done this for years. I doubt many young people are choosing to be a cobbler as a career these days.
My wife has taken shoes to a local cobbler a couple of times. He has the right tools and supplies, and the knowledge and experience to do the job quickly. Still, while the repair cost was quite low, it still cost more to fix the shoe than she paid for them. It was more because she liked the shoes than a rational decision.
If you plan to become a cobbler, or even repair shoes routinely for your family and friends, by all means do it yourself. If you're just trying to save a buck or make your wife proud, there are better ways to that goal.
If you still insist on doing it yourself, and don't want to order 10 heels online, stop by your local cobbler and see if he'll sell you the supplies you need.
Either that or make a pair of flip-flops from an old tire and some string. :)
Good luck, and have fun.
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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On Wed, 8 Jul 2015 04:16:22 +0000 (UTC), HerHusband

LOL. I can relate to that. In college I "fixed" an electric percolator, by buying the missing parts, even though I think it cost more than a new percolator and even though I don't drink coffee.

All I learned is what's inside one. So I've controlled myself a little, but I"m still the way you are.

It's interesting that everyone here seems to agree on this

I've glued the sole onto sneakers. The first time I used while silicone sealant, because it looked like what had crumbled, but it didn't stick well, and more kept crumbling. On this pair, I just used contract cement. I only managed to glue the middle of the sole but it's been weeks of wearing them every day and it's holding well. When it fails, I'll redo it, trying harder to get the outsde of the bottom and the part that runs a centimeter up the sides of the shoe.

Good idea.
When I was looking for little rubber bands, to tighten the arms on my eyeglasses (and not pay the exorbitant price they charge in an "eyeglass repair kit", complete with a little screwdriver, I found a dental supply company online that sold me just one bag of 100 little rubber bands for a couple dollars and shippping was only a couple dollars. I was surprised they didnt' have a minimum order. The piano supply store I looked at had a 35 or maybe 50 dollar minimum to avoid shipping charges, which are otherwise pretty high. That's more typical.

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youtookthe expensive route/
most glass shops at least around here will fix anyones glasses for free, all sorts of minor repairs gratis. they do this in the hope the please person buys glasses from them in the future..
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wrote:

Not in my case, because mine were only reading glasses from the dollar store. Even if I could give him the impression that I also have prescription glasses, I'm not going to do that.
I needed the rubber bands for plastic frames, that in the dollar version get lose soon. I like the ones with plastic frames because they don't have those nose pads whose arms catch on my hair when I put the glasses above my eyes and I need a haircut, but eventually I gave up on those because not only do they get weak and not squeeze my head, they break soon after that. So I buy the metal ones that last much longer, and whose arms can be bent in when they lose their grip. (And I've learned how to keep my hair out of the nosepad arms, most of the time.)
Of course they are all designed for women and so they are a trifle too narrow for my head and that's why they break. One day they had ones makered WIDE, and they worked better. I think that's what I'm using now.
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Micky,

Are you saying you spent FOUR dollars to fix glasses you paid ONE dollar for? :)
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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On Thu, 9 Jul 2015 04:03:46 +0000 (UTC), HerHusband

There are multiple pairs of glasses, The rubber bands extend their life from 2 months to 4 months or so.
Plus sun glasses and safety glasses.

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On 7/8/2015 1:48 AM, micky wrote:

My work shoes started to wear out, and a layer of gorilla tape on the soles gave them more life. Need to put another layer of tape on, some day soon.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
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