Where can I find wood burning furnace comparisons?

Looking to install a wood burning add-on furnace to my electric heat. Really would like one with the maximum overnight lasting time, so that it might still be hot coals in the morning or when I get home after work, but I find it difficult to find these specs.
Anyone know of reports or such info. Couldn't find them on consumer reports, though I am not familiar with that place very much.
Thanks for any help,
Dean
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

that
Do you really mean "furnace"? A wood heater is more practical, though a bit messy. I have a Vermont Casting wood heater that will burn a 10"x20" hardwood log for 8-9 hours.
Bob
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TURTLE wrote:

reburn type

be burning

You can look

buyinmg off the

heater will or

Please define the term "reburn". When I "burn", there is nothing left but ash and that won't "reburn". Obviously I'm missing something here.
Bob S.
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This is Turtle
I don't know about the comparison of them but Ashley has a burn and reburn type wood burning heater and they can go all nite burning on low and still be burning in the morning and you just add some wood and go back to high burn. You can look up UncleJoe.com and look at them but price are a little high by buyinmg off the internet. You need to find them locally.
The Reburn type is what you want and just a regular wood burning heater will or can be real cheap if you look.
TURTLE
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This is Turtle
Reburn is when you burn the piece of wood, then the vapors or smoke is burned again before it leaves the stove. The wood will be burnt twice before it leaves the stove. Also there will be no smoke come out the chimmey for everything is burnt. I do know ashley has the reburn type heaters. Also you will use about 1/2 the wood you use with a Reburn type heater because you use everything and burn it.
TURTLE
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Reburn, would that be a Catalyst inside.
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Reburn is when there is a secondary (usually pre-heated) air source that is injected into the hot smoke vapors to cause that unburnt stuff to ignite and burn. Nearly half the energy value in wood is in that unburnt smoke and vapor.
Thanks for the help! If anyone knows for absolute sure that their own wood furnace does still last till the morning, please mention the brand name and model here.
THX,
Dean
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This is Turtle.
I don't have one but my friend has a camp on a lake near here that has a APS-2000 Ashley brand heater. It does have the reburn on it and we go to bed at 10:00 PM and rise at 6:00 AM to go fishing and it is still burning on reburn mode. All we do is put a few more limbs on it and it fires back up and no relighting it. I know it will go 8 hours without having to put wood on it and still be burning at 70% or better.
They have other brands out there and do the same thing. The reason I speak of this is the ashley is the only one i've been exposed to and see it work.
TURTLE
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Actually, I have seen at my local tractor supply a wood burning furnace that you duct into an existing system to suplliment heat in the winter, not a free standing wood burning heater/stove as is most common.
I was actually thinking of installing one of these units on my house. I live in a heavy wooded area and own more land (farm) a few miles away. I am having to beg people to take wood, at least I would have a use for it and save on the heat bill.
MC
wrote:

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its not in the brand of the wood burner, its the wood and how you use it. throw a few pieces of hardwood in there tightly stacked, and it will burn all night. embers will last much longer. usually till i get home from work.

bed at

reburn
and
of
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Bob - how long does it burn for in your experience? The web site is saying up to 18 hours!
I realize it depends on the wood, which is why I have a bunch of cut wood seasoning right now in the sun for next winter!
Just wonder how many cords I will get through to avoid the electric bills!
Also, do you leave it on in the day when you go to work, or just let it burn out and relight it when you get home?
THX
Dean
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I've had a Charmaster for about 13 years with absolutely no problems .. ... .. it sits right next to my heat pump air handler and shares the ductwork.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I normally put in three good sized sticks of wood morning, afternoon, and evening .. .. .. then load it up before bed and have plenty left in the morning. Then, just top it off again. That's a typical burn pattern for the coldest time of year around here (SE Tennessee) when it gets down to about 20-25 deg on a cold night. Sometimes we get down to 0 deg but not very often. I bought the larger of the two Charmaster units and wished I hadn't. If the outside temp is much above 30, I almost can't dampen it down enough to control the burn and wind up with more creosote than I'd like, but THAT was my choice and now my problem. I just crank it up a bit and crack a few windows. Looks kinda silly having the windows open on a nice (35 deg) day in January !! !! !!
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Ok well I'm in NJ where its bloody cold all winter, and I have a large house, so I might go for the larger one. They do seem to be on the expensive side in comparison to other brands.
So, tell me, supposing you had 12" logs, cut to the right length, do you end up splitting them to make the dry faster and load easier, or do you just throw them in whole (I guess I'm asking if its really heavy to lift in that way).
Dean
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Many good replies here already so I'm going to mention another option.
I was looking at wood burning stove but space limitations wouldn't allow it. Instead I opted for a wood burning fireplace insert.
The original Heat'O'Lator fireplace was one of the smaller sizes. Because of that my insert was also the smallest of the Avalon line.
Performance has been excellent. Being centrally located I can have 85+ on the first floor and 75+ on the second floor of this cape cod style home with outside temps around 10f. The installation company came back last year for chimney cleaning and inspection. With two years of service all they found was fine ash dust, excellent.
Best of all I retained the ambiance of a fireplace with the radiant heat. So nice when watching a football game with snow falling outside.
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