When will you consider taking the entire ceiling sheet rock down?

I am doing some extensive remodeling and the ceiling sheet rock is beginning to look like a battlefield.
Holes cut out for ceiling fans.
Holes cut out to investigate where some mysterious wires/pipes run to.
Holes cut out to run new EMT pipes.
Holes cut out for new recessed cans.
Holes cut out for new AC duct outlet location.
Existing hole for AC duct outlet that is to be relocated.
Existing holes from existing fixtures that are to be eliminated.
Some holes were cut with hole saw (clean) and some holes were made using a hammer (the contractor didn't have a saw handy so he pounded a hole out creating an irregular shaped hole larger than necessary)...
I am wondering, may be it's easier to take the whole thing down and redo new sheetrock, but then I have to cut the holes, tape the joints etc...I am not sure which is more work, a LOT of patches or do new sheet rock?
or should this decision be left to the sheetrock guy - quote me how much to patch and how much to take down and do new to see if it's close?
Thanks in advance,
MC
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On Mon, 28 Jan 2008 13:02:04 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Around here a handyman would get $20.00 per hole patched. Not sure the cost of new sheetrock, except is cost per sq ft to hang.
It would make my neck sore and my arms tired, but I would patch. :)
Oren --
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

...
... If you're going to have it done by "the sheetrock guy", you can ask but you can almost guarantee he'll be cheaper on a clean install rather than patching. Depends also on what the texturing, if any, was on the existing as if there's something other than just smooth coat to match, that's more labor, too. That's assuming you go ahead a do the demo, of course. Most "hangers" won't want to do the demo; they'll expect ready-to-hang framing. So, even if he'll quote that part, it's likely he'll be high dollar for it.
Of course, if there are areas w/ plumbing or other services, one might want to think carefully the decision to sheetrock it all again solid, anyway, in favor of something w/ less intrusive access for future repairs...
--
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Think outside the box:
1. Wallpaper the ceiling. 2. Staple (or glue) ceiling tile to the existing junk. 3. Skylight. 4. ???
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Remove cats first!

Check for cats in the ceiling.

Oren --
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Oren wrote:

Excellent advice! On the same par as turning off the circuit breaker before messing with the electric.
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Yes but that's not an internet classic meme like Ceiling Cat:
http://www.ceilingcat.com/img/ceilingcat.jpg
http://www.ceilingcat.com /
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On Thu, 31 Jan 2008 00:23:08 -0000, Steve Kraus

It sums up the point.
Count cats before you close the ceiling.
Oren --
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Oren wrote:

Or the cat will count coup?
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On Jan 28, 4:02pm, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Is there any particular reason you can't just sheetrock right over the existing sheetrock?
Otherwise, patch it and then popcorn it.
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I wouldn't. Way too heavy on a ceiling.

Great idea. Did that once...covers all sins!
--Jeff
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What about full-depth patches with little concern for cosmetics, then using 1/4" over the whole ceiling? That way the drywall is still at full thickness for any fire codes, and you'd still have the clean, new drywall ceiling, right? Glued and screwed, of course. The biggest problem would be locating joists for screwing. Would there be a sagging problem with that?
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