When will it arrive?

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On 08/14/2014 11:08 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:
[snip]

Yes, and how about 3600?
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wrote:

Military time does not use the colon. That eliminates the confusion of what you are looking at. If you see 0900 (always 4 digits) that is 9 AM. 1200 is noon.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Hi, Regardless, I am at home using the format. Spent number of years overseas every where working for DOD, worldwide comm. system. Long range HF radio, satellite, marine cables, short range VHF/UHF/MW networks, etc. One of them working with 8th RRFS in 'Nam during the war.
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You're right, and this means clocks would have to run backwards half the day and clockwise the other half. It wouldn't be hard to build clocks like that, even mechanical ones. Electronic would probably be easier. But we'll have to recycle all the existing clocks.
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I've read before that this is a convention, that is, that it could have worked either way but they arbitrarily chose this way.
But I don't think so
1:00 Post Meridiem is one hour after the middle of the day, and 12;01PM is one minute after the noon.
So what about 12:00PM. Well that only occurs for an instant, a pico second later, it's no longer noon. It is after noon. The entire minute between 12:00PM and 12:01PM is after noon, afternoon, except for the moment that is noon. Less than a pico-second. A time with no length. Not a time period, not a period, just a time. That is noon. Everything after that is PM.
So not a convention, but following clearly from the rest of the AM/PM time system.
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On 8/14/2014 12:58 PM, micky wrote:

When I was a kid, there were no digital clocks or watches, so we learned correctly that there is no such thing as 12:00AM or 12:00PM, only midnight or noon. When digital timepieces came along, it was overly complicated to design them to display "noon" or "midnight" for one minute apiece each day, so now we have 12:00AM and 12:00PM. It seems obvious to me that the convention of 12:00AM being midnight and 12:00PM being noon is simply the result of how a digital clock works.
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On Thursday, August 14, 2014 3:31:25 PM UTC-4, Bill Ghrist wrote:

An interesting re-invention of history. I've existed a lot longer than the digital watch and like Ed, I knew as a kid that 12AM was midnight, 12PM was noon. It's hard to imagine that with the 12 hour clock system, that dates back many centuries, the issue of whether noon is 12PM or 12AM or neither, never came up and it took the digial watch for that to happen. I suspect 12PM being noon was arrived at shortly after the concept went into use. It certainly was what I grew up knowing in the 60s, before digital watches.
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On 08/14/2014 11:58 AM, micky wrote:
[snip]

It would be strange to have 12:00:00 AM followed (in 1 second) by 12:00:01 PM. People do do strange things, but usually not that one.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us
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On Thu, 14 Aug 2014 15:28:46 -0500, sam E

My microwave can handle that. I can put in 1:30 or 90 and it works the same. I haven't tried 3600 yet, but it probably works too.
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I also grew up when there were no digital clocks for the most part. There were some but they had mechanical numbers that clicked off. No digital watches that I know of in the mid 1950's when I learned to tell time.
I always refer to noon and not 12 PM, but would call it 12:01 PM. Same as for AM being in the dark part of the night and midnight.
While not the offical calling, we were tought to think of the AM as being At Morning and PM being Past Morning.
Not sure if there is an offical way or not to do it.
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I didn't even know anywhere but the US had the DST. Interisting that they would not go to a whole hour when they switch.
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On 08/14/14 04:58 pm, Ralph Mowery wrote:

In the UK DST is called "British Summer Time" (BST). During WW2 and for many years after, there was "British Double Summer Time": *two* hours of Daylight Saving Time for a short period each year.
Perce
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never

win.

If it were shipped by post office, it wouldn't really matter what time they said it would arrive.
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On 08/14/14 07:16 pm, Guv Bob wrote:

A few months back I ordered a book from the UK on a Saturday. Estimated delivery was 3 to 6 weeks by surface mail. It was delivered in the USA on the following Saturday.
The "free shipping" from NewEgg and other online vendors often involves pickup by UPS, FedEx or DHL and transfer to the USPS for delivery. IOW, USPS can deliver things more cheaply than any of those other services. Just once a small package got lost between UPS and USPS (NewEgg shipped a replacement), but other than that I have no complaints.
Perce
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"Mark Lloyd" <

Nah. I prefer date format like this: 08jun14 for example. If this was written 08/06/14 is it the eigth of june or august sixth?
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On 08/14/2014 06:27 PM, Phil Kangas wrote:
[snip]

Order of decreasing significance (big-endian), month written with letters (to avoid ambiguity). That's good, but is it June 14, 2008? It'd be even better with 4 digits for the year.
BTW, It's also 1408110819 (Unix clock).
--
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never

win.

the

time they said it would arrive.

Estimated

involves

IOW,

shipped

USPS is fine for the big junk mailers and 1st class individual pieces. They deliver those right on time. Little mailers like my group (1500 pieces) gets no respect, no respect I tell you. Delivery within 75 mile radius is anywhere from 4 to 12 days for standard mail. First class is supposed to be 1-2 days, but if we mail 1st class with imprint instead of 1st class stamps, it's a week.
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On Thu, 14 Aug 2014 14:44:36 -0700 (PDT), trader_4

And the rest of the 12:00 minute. And the rest of the 12:00:00 second. And the rest of the 12:00:00.0 tenth of a second, and so on.
Everything is post noon except the very instant of noon.

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