When will home prices start droping in coastal areas?

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On Sun, 04 Feb 2007 20:08:05 -0800, Paul snipped-for-privacy@econonet.org wrote:

Bullshit "Insurance companies" DO NOT offer flood insurance. It comes from the government. Insurance companies only handle the paperwork. The government collects a lot of tax money from waterfront property and they are not willing to let that go. The fact still remains that most flood claims come from areas far from the coast. According to FEMA, no state is safe from floods
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On Sun, 4 Feb 2007 15:33:22 -0500, "Joseph Meehan"

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wrote:

That is not a rational estimate and far from what any reasonsible scientist has predicted. I am at 14 feet and I will be dead long before that happens, even if you take the worst guess scenario.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

NOT TRUE.
Here's a VERY "reasonable scientist" (Jim Hansen, director of NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies) who says:
"If we follow business as usual, and we don't get off this course where year by year we're getting larger and larger emissions of CO2, then we'll have large sea-level rises this century and I think that will become more apparent over the next decade or two," Dr Hansen said.
"The last time it was 3C warmer, sea levels were 25 metres [82 feet] higher, plus or minus 10 metres [33 feet]. You'd not get that in one century, but you could get several metres [3.3 feet per meter] in one century," he said.
"Half the people in the world live within 15 miles of a coastline. A large fraction of the major cities are on coastlines."
http://news.independent.co.uk/environment/article2116874.ece
Here are some FACTS:
1. Rising seas, caused by global warming, have for the first time washed an inhabited island off the face of the Earth.
http://news.independent.co.uk/environment/article2099971.ece
2. The Ayles ice shelf (40 square miles) in the Canadian Arctic has broken up, 16 months ago
"Until now, there had not been a similar event among the six major shelves remaining in Canada's Arctic, which are packed with ancient ice that is more than 3,000 years old."
http://news.independent.co.uk/environment/article2112609.ece
3. Greenland's ice shelves are melting and breaking free of the land
http://www.iht.com/bin/print.php?idB19963
Here's an interesting excerpt from some "reasonable scientists"
"A study in The Journal of Climate last June observed that Greenland had become the single largest contributor to global sea-level rise.
Until recently, the consensus of climate scientists was that the impact of melting polar ice sheets would be negligible over the next 100 years. Ice sheets were thought to be extremely slow in reacting to atmospheric warming.
. . . given the acceleration of tidewater-glacier melting, a sea-level rise of a foot or two in the coming decades is entirely possible, he said. That bodes ill for island nations and those who live near the coast.
"Even a foot rise is a pretty horrible scenario," said Stephen P. Leatherman, director of the Laboratory for Coastal Research at Florida International University in Miami.
<snip>
"Here in Miami," Leatherman said, "we're going to have an ocean on both sides of us."
<snip>
Global warming has profoundly altered the nature of polar exploration, said Schmitt, who in 40 years has logged more than 100 Arctic expeditions. Routes once pioneered on a dogsled are routinely paddled in a kayak now; many features, like the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf in Greenland's northwest, have disappeared for good.
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On Sun, 04 Feb 2007 15:06:41 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

You are not considering the storm surges from more powerful storms expected to accompany global warming. There is huge worry about surges moving up rivers, like the Frazer in BC Canada, causing major flood damage miles from the sea.
The wealthy folks, who tend to be the smartest and best informed, are already starting to get out.
It's only a matter of time before flood insurance will become frightfully expensive in these areas if you can buy it at all.
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I think this is a valid topic for home repair since it effects homes and their values. I heard 34% of the population live in coastal areas, this can disrupt home values nationwide
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On Sun, 04 Feb 2007 12:12:04 -0800, Paul snipped-for-privacy@econonet.org wrote:

They must be moving to Florida. The only housing market here that is not being affected by the recent downturn are the multimillion dollar castles by the sea
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On Sun, 04 Feb 2007 22:41:38 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Most Americans don't believe in global warming. The bright folks live elsewhere.
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Related subject: when are they going to envoke not building in 100 year flood plane rule that we have for county's new construction? ;) Frank
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