When to get new water heater ?

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My point was that the power company may or may not foot the bill for getting the lines to the home. That difference in cost, being it done by the home owner or contractor, could be a deal breaker.
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Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
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Yes. That's why drain pans are designed to have a tube/drain pipe that runs through the bottom or out the side of the pan to your sump or a drain, so the water will flow from the pan to the drain before the pan overfills, while keeping the floor dry.
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I still havent decided whether or not to get a new water heater. Like I said already it lasted me 15 years and not a drop of water has spilled out from what I could remember.
I called the manufacturer and they said its pretty rare for these tanks to just let loose and flood your home. They usually start trickling / dropping water out slowly first. Plus, I heard from one of the guys working on my flooring..who said he bought a new water heater and it didnt even last 6 months. It blew open and flooded his house. So thats all I need is for them to install a new one and have the same problem.
So , im more interested in a water alarm now. Anybody recommend one thats really good? I want one where there is a wireless detector so once water is detected, the water to the whole house is automatically shut off.
Is there a company out there thats most popular and reliable ? Im guessing theres millions if I search google now.
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john wrote:
> Plus, I heard from one of the guys

LOL! Reminded me of a guy who tapped into city water lines and ran it into his new house. The dummy didn't known it needed a pressure regulator and he exploded 2 water heaters! They even had pressure relief valves but the water pressure was just too great and the relief valves couldn't relieve the water fast enough.
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Sounds like BS to me. We have 105 psi coming into our building at work and never cause any damage to a water heater. We have 6 of them. FWIW, I don't have a pressure regulator at my house either.
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Why is it that this is the first time I have heard that a pressure regulator is required for a public water supply?
Seems to me if pressure was indeed that high that it would have popped a line upstream, rather than a pristine new one.
Reminds me of a guy that used to do too much acid.
Steve
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On Sat 31 May 2008 11:31:56p, SteveB told us...

Not implausable. Back in the 1950s my parents bought a house in a neighborhood quite close to the reservoir and pumping station. We were blowing washers right and left in every faucet, and serious knocking in almost every pipe. My dad, an engineer, measured the pressure at 145 psi. He installed a regulator soon after that. I think most homes in the area ended up with regulators.
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Wayne Boatwright
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They are not all that unusual in some places. Home appliances and plumbing fixtures are designed to operate within a range of water pressure. Some places have a lot more than the 40-60 pounds of pressure that are considered normal for residential use. In those cases, a regulator is installed.
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On Jun 1, 7:30�am, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

perhaps the regulator is also a anti siphon valve?
they are being required here along with a pressure tank, so dirty water cant siphon back and make someone ill.....
i sold my moms old home a few years ago, and had the valve and pressure tank added, to meet new code,
the ultimate buyer was very concerned with tht tank and what it meant, he had never seen one before, or a condensate pump on the furnce either......
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

I think one way you can tell is the presence of water towers. Many municipal systems have a relatively small pump that pumps the water UP to the tower, 24/7, then lets gravity supply the pressure to the mains. This has the advantages of a smaller pump and stable pressures.
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There is a FIRST time for everyone.

Our local water utility, Metropolitan Utilities District (dig the acronymn), recently acquired our private neighborhood's district water system.
Some months after the switch-over was made, the utility announced they would be increasing the line pressure to improve substandard service in some areas.
Their first-class-mailed propoganda included the advise that a pressure regulator might be needed inside my home to cope with the increased pressure.

USED to do? <big grin> JR
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Curious, is it wet behind your ears?
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