When did they start putting dampers in chimneys?

Page 2 of 2  


The 1700's house we lived in when I was a kid had dampers in all 6 fireplaces. No one had lived in it since the Civil War- so the dampers were installed before that. They appeared to be original.

Caves and teepees had no dampers. I think Franklin writes about the value of a damper in his patent on his friend's stove. [around 1750 and not much like the 'Franklin' stove we know of today]

Originally, maybe. Houses don't usually have enough airflow to try that today-- you could open a window in the room.

I would guess mid-1800's-- but that's just a guess.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Thanks all. Thats' what I sort of thought, not counting what Harry said.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

== Dampers controlled the rate of combustion in all kinds of stoves and fireplaces. Without them a good many homes would have burned down. If all the fireplaces in North America were closed off or removed we could save one pile of money on energy. The wasted heat from fireplaces is totally unnecessary. ==
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

re: "It can also be used to slow down a fire, perhaps?"
I had a friend that moved into an renovated farmhouse. It had a great room that was both the living room and dining room, separated by furniture. There was a huge fireplace in the living room area and a coal burning stove in the dining room.
They had been using the coal burning stove for a few weeks (topping it off 3 times a day) and had used the fireplace for small fires on occasion.
One wintry evening they threw a party and built a huge fire in the fireplace, leaving the glass doors open for effect.
The house kept getting colder and colder so the husband went to check the coal stove. The temperature was down and the coal was almost out.
Curious as to what was going on, he opened the door on the stove, coating himself and most of the dining room area with coal dust.
Turns out the fireplace was pulling air down the coal stove chimney and putting the coal out. Once he opened the door, the rush of air spewed coal dust everywhere.
What a mess!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Years ago, I was helping my boss install a furnace. Of course, it was cold. So, the folks lit a fire in the fireplace. The make up air came donwn the furnace chimney, which was drawing pure fireplace smoke. The bitter acrid smoke was really killing me. I ended up wrapping a shopping bag over the end of the flue, and some duct tape. And then go open a cellar window to let some make-up air in.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Several hundred years ago would be a good guess.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snip

...
No, dampers are not universal. My Heat N Glo Northstar doesn't have one. It's airtight and fire is controlled by air in, not restricting smoke out. I thought it was strange when it was installed a couple years ago, but it works fine.
--
Steve
southiowa
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.