When did builders start using OSB for floor joists?

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"OSB is a decent product, especially when you consider its price and
utilization of a wide range of wood specimen."
I don't want to be a stickler for details, but I think you meant to say:
"OSB is a decent product, especially when you consider its price and utilization of a wide range of wood species."
Here in Canada, we've had huge areas planted with only one kind of tree laid to waste by the Formosan Pine Beetle. Having multiple species of pine, spruce, fir and other fast growing coniferious trees not only slows the spread of such parasites, but it helps the forest recover better after after an attack.
Ditto for agriculture. Mixed farming is the most sustainable form of agriculture. It's not great for maximizing profits, but it prevents any one parasite from destroying the farmer's whole crop, and that's good for sustainability.
--
nestork


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wrote:

I've pulled siding nails out with my bare fingers. That's enough "instrumentation" for me.

Where are the siding nails supposed to go, moron?

It's crap, you're right, it's cheap crap.
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I used 1-1/4" T&G OSB flooring for our house (Don't recall the brand now). It's strong and doesn't have voids like plywood does. They also put some kind of coating on the sheets (wax?) that repels water nicely. Ours was exposed to rain for 3-4 months during construction. The water would bead up on top and we would just sweep it off each morning.
I'm sure long term water exposure would cause rot, but you would get that with regular plywood also.

I used CDX plywood for our roof sheathing because it's slightly stronger than OSB, and because it's lighter and was easier to carry up to the roof.
I also used CDX plywood for our wall sheathing, because I wanted a rough sawn face for simulated board and batten (even though we decided not to install the battens). I didn't care for the look of the textured OSB plywood.
Otherwise, I usually use OSB and CDX interchangeably. OSB is usually cheaper, so I tend to use it where appearance isn't an issue.
Anthony Watson Mountain Software www.mountain-software.com/about.htm
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On Mon, 18 Feb 2013 17:46:39 +0000 (UTC), HerHusband

OSB or particle board? I've seen some nice T&G engineered subflooring (decided to use 3/4" ply, though). It's a *long* way from the crap they use for sheathing.

Sure, I just worry about the bathroom. I've had ply disintegrate due to a very slow unseen leak. Termite barf will be worse.
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I guess my memory is failing me. After looking through our building photos (from 2003) it appears we used 3/4" Structurwood Gold OSB T&G subflooring.
In any case, when nailed to the joists with construction adhesive it made a rock solid floor. We didn't notice any edge swelling or other issues despite being exposed to the weather for a few months during construction.

Many years ago my father-in-law closed in his carport with "waferwood". Kind of a really cheap version of OSB. Surprisingly, other than looking terrible, it held up fairly well to nearly 30 years of weather exposure.
Anthony Watson Mountain Software www.mountain-software.com/about.htm
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On Feb 17, 10:05 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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Years ago... nearly 20, I did some work for a grumpy old structural engineer.
He hated OSB, he thought OSB was junk. He paid me to build and test some cripple walls.
We used full dimension old timber for framing and a number of sheathing materials. We used plywood on some specimens & OSB on others. We "over drove" the sheathing nails, we left the specimens outside & "watered them" everyday for weeks.
Much to his dismay... the OSB sheathed cripple walls (watered or unwatered, over driven or flush driven nails) all performed just fine.
We came away with a new respect to OSB.
TImber structures are designed & built to keep the materials dry, they do get wet at times but even sawn lumber has its limits.
OSB is good product, you can use it without concern.
I built a "temporary" shed out of OSB. I never painted it. It weathered about 8 years in SoCal...not a huge amount of rain (~15 inches pre year on average but a couple years with 20"+)
The surface of the OSB suffered a bit & generated some roughness but no delimitation & no loss of strength.
cheers Bob
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On Sunday, February 17, 2013 10:41:51 PM UTC-8, DD_BobK wrote:

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When I see and smell genuine lumber I KNOW that what’s in it is pure Mother Nature. With OSB you can’t tell if and or how much of what is in it.
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replying to SMS, Rondog wrote: I first saw it built into our then new 100k sq ft.building back in 1990 here in calif. We thought it was sketchy but the building is still there. However when we walked on the roof, there was a noticeable bounce to our steps.
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