When are the metal legs under deck posts needed?

When are the metal legs under deck posts needed?
My old deck had the 1/2 inch high set of metal legs under two of its three 4x4 wooden support posts.
But all of the posts stood on cinder blocks. Were the metal legs really needed?
I thought they are to keep the termites and other living things from getting from the ground into the wood, but doesn't the cinder block fulfill the same function? In the case of one of my new legs, it rests on a 3 foot by 3 foot cement (or concrete?) slab. Isn't that good enough also, without the metal legs?
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The metal leg is to prevent the wood from wicking moisture from the concrete.
G.S.
wrote:

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metal legs wont stop termites.
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mm wrote:

The little 1/2" things are mainly to keep the end of the wood post from wicking water up from the concrete. Concrete is a sponge, to an extent. They make a huge difference in the lifespan of the decorative wood posts on front porches. Lotsa times they are also used to position the post on the concrete- you can position the metal thing exactly, anchor it, and it holds the bottom of post against wind and aggressive kids. (When wind lifts up on a porch roof, it can unload that column almost completely.)
-- aem sends...
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Dang, now I have to go back and put one of them in. Or three if you say that cinder blocks have the same problem.
Although in theory this setup is only for a year or two until I decide what I actually want.
Thanks to you and Gordon and Ransley.

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Old deck? my old PT deck is 20 ft from a lake doesnt have them and is maybe 40 yrs old with not rot. They help, but they are not always "needed". Old PT is better. If you see rot, then cut off the bottom and use them.
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On Sat, 23 May 2009 04:59:03 -0700 (PDT), ransley

That sounds great. Thanks a lot.
You saved me a trip to the store today.
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Wood in contact with concrete is a no-no unless treated or a "resistant" species.
That's why is a wood framed structure the bottom plate / sill plate is treated timber.
The "metal" plate (ie post base) is what is required for a post.
I'm not a huge fan of Simpson products but unless you're inclined to design & fab your own connectors.....their stuff is generally good enough.
http://www.strongtie.com/products/categories/post_bases.html
cheers Bob
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Alternatively.....you could shore (if necessary), shorten the post & insert a sound chunk of treated timber.
imo most the Simpson post bases barely do their job, the EPB44 is decent but hard to find sometimes, the EPB44A is a folded sheet metal POS.
cheers Bob
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