When a gallon is not a gallon

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On 02/28/08 01:08 pm snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

And our regional supermarket chain's store brand of Yogurt still comes in 8oz. cups. That's what we buy for ourselves, but my MIL -- we do her shopping -- insists that she has to have Yoplait, which costs more for only 6oz.
Perce
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On Thu, 28 Feb 2008 12:31:16 +0000, franz fripplfrappl wrote:

I dont' think so. Sorry.
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re: A pound of coffee is about 9 ounces. 5# of sugar is 4#.
I'm sure you meant to say "Some containers of coffee are 9 ounces" and "Some bags of sugar are 4#"
When I walk into a coffee shop and ask for a pound of coffee, I get 16 oz. When I go to the public market and ask for a pound of sugar, I get 16 oz.
Are some stores selling 9 oz of coffee for the same price as they used charge for a pound? Sure - but they don't call it a pound. What's the big deal? Prices have gone up. Anybody that's "fooled" by the marketing ploy of downsizing the containers and keeping the price the same is just that - a fool. If you need a pound of something, buy a pound of it.
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wrote:

re: A pound of coffee is about 9 ounces. 5# of sugar is 4#.
I'm sure you meant to say "Some containers of coffee are 9 ounces" and "Some bags of sugar are 4#"
When I walk into a coffee shop and ask for a pound of coffee, I get 16 oz. When I go to the public market and ask for a pound of sugar, I get 16 oz.
Are some stores selling 9 oz of coffee for the same price as they used charge for a pound? Sure - but they don't call it a pound. What's the big deal? Prices have gone up. Anybody that's "fooled" by the marketing ploy of downsizing the containers and keeping the price the same is just that - a fool. If you need a pound of something, buy a pound of it.
==================
These complaints come from people who think they should get regular salary increases, but nobody else should.
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Utter nonsense. A pound is sixteen ounces. Five pounds is five pounds, not four. If you buy a bag of sugar that is _plainly_marked_ "4 pounds" thinking it is five, you need to be looking in the mirror for the source of that problem.
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True, but it happens more often that you'd think. As a whole, consumers are not very bright. Marketing people are winning.
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wrote in message

One of your last three sentences doesn't belong with the other two.
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Doug Miller wrote:

It is still dishonest no matter how you look at it. I am quite capable of reading labels. A short quantity non-standard packaging is simply wrong. A quart should be a quart. Not 28 oz "at everyday low prices". Ironically it is everybody's friend the big box store (they tell us that frequently so it must be true) that is behind this.
My buddy works for a company that manufactures packaging equipment. One of their customers asked to have a "4 up" line installed. Usual packaging for their product is "6 up" or a six pack. The reason was because walmart had decided they could screw their customers thinking that people wouldn't notice that the canned items were in a 4 pack and think their buddy walmart was helping them with "low everyday prices". It didn't work and the supplier took a serious hit because of the money they had to spend on the line.
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re: It is still dishonest no matter how you look at it.
How is it *dishonest* if the package is correctly marked as to the amount of product it contains?
re: I am quite capable of reading labels.
Then what's the issue? You read the label, you know how much is in the package and how much it costs, you make a decision as to whether to buy it or not. Next!
re: A short quantity non-standard packaging is simply wrong.
What's the standard? If you are referring to the de facto standard that certain products have always been packaged in certain amounts, then look up the definition of de facto. It's an agreed upon standard, not anything legal. If everyone packages ice cream in 56 oz packages from now on, that will eventually become the de facto standard.
re: A quart should be a quart
A quart is a quart. 28 oz is 28 oz. Please give us an example of a product that is labeled as quart but only contains 28 oz.
I've said it before and I'll repeat it here in case it was missed:
If you shop by unit pricing, it doesn't matter if the package is 28 oz or 32 oz. You're paying for what you're getting - no one cheated, no one lied. They simply raised the price by charging you the same amount for less product - but they clearly informed you of the price increase by posting the unit price on the shelf right next to the product.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

Because it deviates from normally accepted standards/practices.
Lets say that you have been driving through "Smithville" every day forever. One night "Smithville" changes all of the speed signs to reflect a speed which is now 20 MPH lower.
The next morning you are driving through "Smithville" and are pulled over for speeding. The officer points out the new signs and then issues a ticket. Would you accept the ticket, plead guilty and pay the fine or protest it because of lack of notice?
Or lets say that you have been parking in "Brownville" forever to do errands etc on your way home. The "Brownville" parking rules have been free parking after 6PM forever. They change the rules without any announcement and you find a $45 ticket on your car. Would you pay it?

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wrote:

You are the CEO at Breyers. You're about to shrink your ice cream containers. How would YOU notify customers?
Nobody else is involved. Just you. Whatever idea you have for notifying customers, your employees will make it happen. Describe your idea(s).
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote: ...

More appropriately, you're CEO at Breyers and your input costs owing to fuel and milk have risen 20%, health care ancillary costs for employees and salaries by 30% and you're still in competition w/ all the others for shelf space in the markets and customer share. How do you maintain market share and still have an acceptable margin?
--
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Exactly. Not only that, but you (and some supermarkets) have some of the most advanced data processing methods available, and you know for a fact that you move a LOT less ice cream when the price approaches $4.00 per half gallon (old size). So, you have a choice: Leave things as they are, raise prices, or shrink the package.
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clipped

tough to compare prices because it seemed that stuff at Walmart was packaged differently that the same brands in other stores - stuff like detergent, shampoo, etc. I didn't shop Walmart often enough to become familiar with pricing, and I think I quit while they were still on their "Made in America" line. In one town I lived for a few years, Walmart escorted out of the store some shoppers who had been writing down prices so's they could compare. That was when I quit Walmart. One of my last purchases at Walmart was a gallon of paint remover, because other stores were out of stock, at $7 more than the same size, same brank I had purchased locally a couple of weeks before.
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

"New Family Size!" (to reflect the size of new families)
"Economy Size!"
"More miles to the gallon!"
"Healthy pack!"
"Doctor approved!"
"Fewer calories!"
"Less filling, more taste!"
There's really no limit...
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Those ideas are as shitty as the so-called "deception" which some are complaining about in this discussion.
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

You didn't ask for "non-shitty" ideas. And I think you're wrong. All of them have worked.
Is there anything else I can help you with?
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Yes. Please go kill yourself. But, I'll send money to your family to replace the lost income from your job cleaning bus station bathrooms. Let me know where to send the check.
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

"Cleaning bus station bathrooms?" Where'd you get the idea I'm employed in that area?
And thanks for offering to provide for my family in the event of my demise. That's not only neighborly, but it's the right thing to do.
I've made a note to include your email address in the next revision of my will. Don't be surprised if you get a polite note sometime in the (hopefully) distant future.
Thanks in advance for your compassion. You are such a nice person.
Love,
HeyBub
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If I was the CEO of Breyers, it would still be 64 ounces, but at a higher price. Same way they've been doing it for 100 years or so.
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