Wheelbarrow loads

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On Thu, 21 Apr 2016 10:52:46 -0700, Don Y

Ed gave you links to about a dozen models and every one had the recommended max weight in the specifications page
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On 4/21/2016 11:49 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

*Vic* gave me two links (which I acknowledged) to some models from two vendors.
I've no idea which "house names" are made by QINGDAO YICHUN METAL MANUFACTURE CO. so can't make even a GUESS as to how many of the EIGHT wheelbarrows listed are sold under "more recognizable" names -- nor where they sit quality-wise relative to other offerings.
The *one* wheelbarrow in the second link is sold at ONE store in town -- 20 miles from here. And, again, no way to gauge how it sits relative to other offerings.
Are these "exceptions"? Or, "The Rule"? (in the latter case, does that mean 200, 160, 100, or 80kg is "The Rule"? :> )
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On Thu, 21 Apr 2016 12:26:15 -0700, Don Y

Volume capacity is a simple calculation of the tray size. Tires are what determine the weight capacity of a wheelbarrow. http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/category_tires-wheels+wheelbarrow-wheels_24 You'll find the load capacity for a number of tires there.
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Don Y posted for all of us...

At what speed rating? What manufacturer? Flintstone, Mickylin or Hava Flat?
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Oren posted for all of us...

James Carville
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Any one else but me think this will make the Bad Golferman top 20 list, this month?
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On Wed, 20 Apr 2016 12:37:36 -0700, Don Y

A commercial grade one will be OK with 450-500 but it will be a trick doing it. Paved surface, beefy guy, no sweat.
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On 4/20/2016 4:22 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Set the wheelbarrow on any surface you like. Imagine it need not be moved -- or would be moved by someone of superhuman strength.
The question I am asking is: what sort of weight load would you expect the wheelbarrow to be capable of handling? You can buy them in many "manufacturing grades", built of many different types of materials, etc.
But, aside from a volumetric capacity -- and the weight of the wheelbarrow itself -- there is nothing to tell you what the limit (or even "typical") weight loading they can support.
Dirt, sand and concrete come to mind as examples of the heavier sorts of "loads". You probably would NOT use a wheelbarrow to lug around steel blocks -- but might for cinder/concrete blocks (ditto stone).
*If* you loaded a wheelbarrow to capacity with (for example) concrete, would you discover that the wooden "arms" would snap if you tried to heft the load? Or, the tire's seal give way?
A cheap wheelbarrow readily claims the same volumetric capacity as an expensive one. Presumably, the more expensive has other capacities that the cheap one can't match -- yet these are never spelled out (numerically -- saying things like "all metal construction" doesn't mean anything quantifiable)
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On Wed, 20 Apr 2016 21:58:29 -0700, Don Y

http://www.cn-wheelbarrow.com/
http://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/groundwork-wheelbarrow-5-cu-ft
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On 4/20/2016 10:33 PM, Vic Smith wrote:

"GardenHoses-WeightCapacity"? Interesting unit of measure...
None seem to handle more than ~400+ pounds. That suggests only 1/8 cu yd of concrete; 1/4 cu yd of dirt
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On Wed, 20 Apr 2016 22:46:58 -0700, Don Y

I think you have to apply about 1/3 of the weight on the fulcrum in lifting force, so there's reasonable limits. I've got a cheap wheelbarrow, and only move about 250lbs in it. It gets tipsy beyond that. A well designed wheelbarrow will basically carry what you can handle - until something breaks. Think of it as a crowbar.
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On Wed, 20 Apr 2016 21:58:29 -0700, Don Y

The limiting factor will usually be the tire itself and that will be stamped on the side wall. When you are using the wheelbarrow correctly virtually all of the load will be on the tire. A 5/8" steel axle might deflect a little but it will not break and if the handles are hardwood they are not breaking either. That is why I said "commercial grade" There are some pretty cheap wheelbarrows out there.
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Don Y wrote:

some wheelbarrows are not very sturdy. we have one of those that Ma picked up for cheap from some chain store.
we also have two other contractor grade wheel barrows that were/are used for much heavier loads.
on a good surface i can fill the contractor grade ones completely, but you have to be skilled enough to not dump them. i'm not sure how heavy crushed limestone or pea gravel is per load, but it's pretty heavy, i've moved a lot of tons of those.
the el cheapo one i don't even like to use... the tire is narrow and the frame is wobbly.
they now make some wheelbarrows with two wheels! i would like to get one of those some day when the rest of these wear out and get recycled or something...
songbird
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On 4/21/2016 10:33 AM, songbird wrote:

Obviously addressing different requirements and price points.

"Aggregate" products tend to be about 1T/cu yd. If you have a 6 cu ft wheelbarrow (which is a "larger size"), that's about 400+ pounds, fully loaded. But, once you address limits on fill to avoid spillage (once you tip the wheelbarrow to move it), you're probably down in the ~4 cu ft ballpark (250 pounds).
Of course, the machine supports some of that load for you, in transit. So, "you" can transport more than "you" can carry!
[I've moved 300 pound refrigerators, 700 pound gun safes, etc.; I assure you , I can't CARRY anywhere near that sort of weight!]

Pneumatic tires also tend to "fail" (the seal breaks) when twisted or leaned (sideways) too heavily. This leaves you with a loaded wheelbarrow and a tire that you CAN'T inflate (without taking the load off the SINGLE tire!)
OTOH, they tend to be better on soft/uneven surfaces.

Yes, they also make 4 wheel carts, ATV drawn conveyances, bobcats, back hoes, etc. :>
[I've a friend with a "personal back hoe"; another with a front loader. Sad NOT to see them in CONSTANT use!]
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Don Y wrote: ...

i wouldn't say it is that much less, i filled it usually within just a few inches from the top in front so that when i lifted the wheelbarrow it shifted just enough to be full. this is important when you are moving tons and tons, you really don't want yet one more load... :)

for sure! that's why i used it. for small jobs i carry a few buckets in the wheelbarrow or even just carry them. depends upon what time of the year it is and how in shape i am. right now, the wheelbarrow carries stuff.

we have too much uneven stuff to even contemplate something like a hard tire.

they do have these for rent... i am very much doing the gardening i do as physical exercise with some meaning behind it so i tend to dig with a shovel or haul things by hand. noisy machines would have been useful at first, but now everything is in place so such a machine has little use for us. not that i could not find something fun to do... but the manager might object. :)
songbird
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On 4/21/2016 12:46 PM, songbird wrote:

Understood. I moved 20T of aggregate into the back yard... *after* 6T of topsoil. And, another 6T for the front yard. There is a very deliberate calculation that you make when you trade off weight of "this load" vs. "yet another trip".
OTOH, having to go back and rake up stuff that spilled along the way is yet another "effort" to be factored in.

Nowadays, I only use the wheelbarrow to mix cement/concrete. Any digging that I do can pile the soil up adjacent to the hole instead of having to MOVE it any distance (a shower curtain or tarp ON the aggregate helps keep the soil from blending in with the aggregate to complicate cleanup).

I learned the "practical limit" for the pneumatic tire unit The Hard Way. I.e., that "extra trips" took less time and effort than "bigger loads" -- esp when the tire could so dramatically deflate under load.
Had I the need to do it over, I'd consider spreading planks on the surface and riding over those.
[Or, a bobcat, like the neighbor did]

I've dug out all of the (large!) root crowns of all of the trees I felled, here. The largest resulted in a net deficit of almost 7T of soil (to account for the "wood" I removed from the ground). You can't really use a motorized tool for this as you never have "a clear shot". And, can't get *under* the root crown to address those tap roots.
I also watched a neighbor using a small back hoe to trench for a new electric service "make a mistake" and catch the natural gas line. Doesn't take much to realize there are extra risks (potential costs) associated with those labor savers.

I would consider a back hoe to install the cistern. There shouldn't be MUCH there that would complicate the digging. And, get double-duty out of it by trenching for the french drain at the same time.
As I get older, the idea of that much digging doesn't appeal to me... (if it EVER DID!)
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wrote:

The only thing that comes to mind might be iron for one reason or another. That probably wouldn't be something Joe Homeowner would do. Farmers wouldn't generally haul anything too heavy. They have all sorts of equipment sitting around. The only tning that comes to mind as far as sturdiness would be shipping weight. It wouldn't be all that accurate but might serve as a rough guide.
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On 4/21/2016 11:08 AM, Dean Hoffman wrote:

Maybe "scrap iron". I can't imagine tradesmen using a wheelbarrow to haul any (many?) metal things as metal pieces are often inconvenient sizes for a wheelbarrow.

Yes. Ditto for large-scale landscapers. And, nothing liquid as it would slosh around making a wheelbarrow a poor choice.
OTOH, someone might put a vessel IN a wheelbarrow and use it to transport the contents of the vessel, that way. But, the size and shape of the wheelbarrow limit the type of vessel that might be used. E.g., you wouldn't try to move a 55G barrel as it simply wouldn't fit (55G = ~450 pounds)
Concrete blocks (or bricks) could probably be piled higher than something that "sags" (like WET concrete). So, you might be able to get a heavier load (than concrete) with that sort of approach.
I guess I can also look at what capacities bobcats can handle and use that as a ballpark figure for the high end of what might be expected of a wheelbarrow (specious reasoning as you might opt to use a bobcat for reasons OTHER THAN "too heavy for a wheelbarrow")

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wrote:

Would OSHA have any words of "wisdom"? Maybe wheelbarrows are built to OSHA standards more or less.
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On 4/21/2016 4:12 PM, Dean Hoffman wrote:

Hmmm.... that's another possible source of information. The list of models that Vic provided includes a "double wheeled" unit rated at 320kg (700 pounds). Hard to imagine someone making a unit that can't be *moved* by a human!
I have a neighbor who works for the state ("safety"). I'll check with him when he returns (I think he's been deployed to TX or CO or one of those other places getting hammered by the weather, lately).
Thx!
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