wheel in garage for winding up hose on, broke off. Replacement?

It was designed spin around a water faucet that was sticking out perpendicular to the wall -- you'd screw the female end of the hose onto a rotating extension of the water faucet, which was the central axis of the wheel.
As you spin the wheel (via a crank attached near the outer rim of the wheel), the hose would be pulled up off the floor and wrap around the wheel, making for a nice compact hose-storage system.
What *I* used it for winding on outdoor wlectric cable, eg 100-foot long 12-guage extension cord.
Anyway, the wheel has now broken off. Actually, it was the water-pipe going from the water faucet to the center of whe spinning wheel (water couldn't leak out) that snapped.
Any suggestions where'd you get such a thing?
And how would you securly attach it to rock wall (ie, the wall of the garage)?
--

Yes, I know I could have googled, etc, but since I had
just typed in two other alt-home-repair posts, it was
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 25 May 2012 02:34:31 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote:

http://www.rapidreel.com/product/wall-mount-garden-hose-reel /
I have the model on a stand and live it. So much better than the crap at the big box stores.
I'd lag it into a couple of studs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'll totally agree with what you said. But why would one want to store an extension cord outdoors?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The wheel that broke off was just *inside* the garage, next to the big garage door. To use it (whatever was wrapped around it) you'd of course have to open the door (and keep it open).
David
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks for the link!
Now a really naive questioni: what does "to lag it into" mean?
And remember, this is a ROCK wall.
Thanks,
David
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 1 Jun 2012 00:39:52 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote:

There are various anchors that will hold, either with lag bolts or a stud and nut. The hard part is boring a hole in the rock. You probably need about 5/8" or so. Masonry bit and patience.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 25 May 2012 02:34:31 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote:

I have one close to this in my garage I use for electric cord. http://tinyurl.com/6s4c3p8 Got 3 others around the house for hoses, 2 attached to brick walls.
Just browse the net for hose reels to find what you want. The cheapest ones that aren't obvious garbage have worked well for me. Not sure what you mean by "rock" wall. Anyway, if it's sheetrock use a couple 1"x 2" wood cleats screwed into 2 studs, adjusting the distance between them so the holes on the reel will match up. If the reel holes match the studs, you don't need the cleats. Pre-drill any screw holes in the cleats so they don't split. If it's really rock, don't know. Concrete, look up Tapcon. Use wood cleats. Brick, drill holes in the mortar joints for plastic plugs, using masonry bit,. Screw wood cleats to them, attach reel to cleats.
--
Vic





Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What do I mean by "rock" wall?
Well, I guess that where you live they don't build house walls out of rock. Here, just north of NYC, they do.
The ground here is *really* rocky. BIG rocks. HARD rocks.
Dig a hole for a basement, and you end up with a large pile of them.
And they'd use them for building maybe the first floor's walls of a house.
(Our house was built in 1931, I think. Labor cheap then, I guess.)
...
I just went down and looked. The rock is used in the outside wall; large concrete blocks for the wall that a room is on the other side of.
David
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 1 Jun 2012 00:55:41 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote:

If you're going to hang the reel on the concrete block wall, use the brick method above. Attach in the mortar joints and don't drill into the blocks. Just measure right so the reel hanger holes with line up with the cleats.
-- Vic

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On May 25, 2:34am, snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote:

So is there any good reason why you would wind an electrical cord on a hose reel still attached to the water line ?
There are many other ways to handle that chore without using a reel which is attached to a water pipe...
You can use a freestanding hose reel for such purposes...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 25 May 2012 02:34:31 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote:

They sell reels made for extension cords that are probably smaller and more well suited for the use. You could make something from a small piece of log and a few circles of plywood too. Then drill a hole in the middle and use a long bolt to attach it to the wall. All hose reels made these days are plastic garbage not worth buying.
They also sell cheap plastic cord reels that will last a year or two.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, I've seen some of those.
But I have two #12 100' extension-cords plugged together for total of 200'. Gotta be a pretty big reel!
And strong, too, because that much of that kind (#12) cable weighs a bunch.
David
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Maybe not so simple. It attached (at the center) by a hard metal tube, maybe 1/2 inch in diameter, through which water would flow through some spinnable connection to a male faucet that the "center end" of the hose would screw onto. You'd then crank (there was a crank sticking out of the side of the weel, near the outer edge) on or off the wheel.
Not a simple fix. Besides, I don't use it for hose any more. (Wraps hose too tight; the flexing not good for the hose. Doesn't seem to bother a #12 extension cord.)
David
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 1 Jun 2012 01:02:52 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote:

And don't pay attention to the anti-plastic fanatics. I've cranked 150' of hose on and off the one I hung on my brick wall about 7 years ago. A Suncast, something like the WM200 here http://hosereel.suncast.com/selector / Check out that TWM200. Level wind, like my baitcasting reels. I only paid about 30 bucks for it at one of the Borgs.. Looks and works like new - and not a spot of rust on it. The wood cleats I used don't look too good though.
--
Vic



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.