What would you use for a 100 foot long clothesline 50 feet up?

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On Wed, 24 Sep 2014 17:14:24 -0400, dadiOH wrote:

Good idea!
Then I could use the two-inch steel pulleys, since the actual width of the pulley wheel wouldn't be what is keeping the two ropes apart.

I didn't understand why a clothesline isn't feasible.
Nobody goes from a window to a tree?
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On Wed, 24 Sep 2014 17:10:39 -0400, dadiOH wrote:

That, I've never done!
I didn't even know you _could_ splice a clothesline rope.
I'll have to look up how, once I buy the right type.
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Jason Marshall wrote: "I have a third-story window that goes out to a grove of oak trees where I want to attach a clothesline from the window to the trees about 100 feet away."
LOL and I thought this thing was going between two highrise apartments across from each other on Fifth Ave in Manhattan!
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Jason Marshall wrote: "I have a third-story window that goes out to a grove of oak trees where I want to attach a clothesline from the window to the trees about 100 feet away. "
LOL and I thought from the subject that this thing was going between two high rise apartments across from each other on Fifth Ave. in Manhattan!
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Jason Marshall wrote: "I have a third-story window that goes out to a grove of oak trees where I want to attach a clothesline from the window to the trees about 100 feet away. "
LOL and I thought from the subject that this thing was going between two high rise apartments across from each other on Fifth Ave. in Manhattan!
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On Wed, 24 Sep 2014 16:17:23 -0700, thekmanrocks wrote:

I should have mentioned the grove is on a hill, which brings the BOTTOM of the trees about at the level of midway through the second story.
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Jason Marshall wrote:

if you were using metal wire, which doesn't like to be bent back upon itself, so you would need 4 90 degree bends.
With a more flexible line, you would create a loop, with a upper and lower line. Knot it securely in the upper line, and pull the lower line until the knot is near the far pulley, then start hanging whatever you are drying from the lower line. Hang one item, then pull the top line; the knot will move toward you, and the first item will move away. Then hang the second item and repeat the pulling. Eventually the lower line will be filled, or you will be out of items. Reverse to collect the dried items. The weight of the drying items on the bottom line will keep the lines apart. You still need some kind of device to allow stretch when the tree sways, but limits stretch when the line is loaded.
I say use a knot, because splicing requires skill and experience, and I wouldn't go through learning that procedure for a one-time job. Also, if well tied, a knot can be untied if you want to take the line inside for the winter. You can't do that with a splice.
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On Wed, 24 Sep 2014 20:42:03 -0400, J Burns wrote:

I went for a walk through the oak grove on the hill at the back of the house, and I might just put the line through a set of trees.
Of course, then it's shaded, but, they will still dry. I guess I'm more worried about the birds ...
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No, it won't last forever. The sun eats everything including my 81 year old forearms. The advantage is no (appreciable) stretch.
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On 9/25/2014 9:02 AM, dadiOH wrote:

Better check and see if you are legal. It says the right to keep and forearms shall not be infringed, but now days you might need a permit, especially if concealed hand arms.
Old folks tend to shrink, not stretch vertical. And stretch horizontal.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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Plait, not plaid.
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It depends on how the rope is constructed, not on its use.

There are two joining splices for three strand twist rope: short and long.
The short splice increases the diameter of the rope(s) where they are joined. Here's a how to... http://www.animatedknots.com/spliceshort/index.php?Categ=splicing&LogoImage=LogoGrog.jpg&Website=www.animatedknots.com
The long spice does not increase the diameter... http://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/document.do?docId 0
However, there is no reason to splice the rope, a knot will do. I know you are worried that the knot won't pass through he sheave but it doesn't have to...
You start hanging clothes with next to the knot. You pull the other side of the rope so the knot travels away from you and then hang more clothes. You repeat all this until the knot reaches the sheave farthest from you; when it does, you have hung all the wet laundry you can possibly hang, a splice won't let you hang more.
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None that I have ever met :)
Two reasons:
1. Hanging out a window to hang clothes from three stories up injects a certain amount of danger.
2. You are talking about a 100' long line. That is a L O N G clothsline, most would be in the 30' or less range. The longer the line the more sag there will be with a given weight. Now, if you hang up 100' of wet socks or underwear, that is one thing; 100' of wet towels and sheets is another.
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Bird poop? You could always build a roof over the clothesline :)
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On Thu, 25 Sep 2014 09:25:50 -0400, dadiOH wrote:

I have reconsidered, and, back on the ground, up on the oak knoll, I can string a line between two trees, even though it will be shaded (and birded).
So, now the problem set becomes simpler.
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On Thu, 25 Sep 2014 09:17:03 -0400, dadiOH wrote:

Having never hung clothes on a clothesline, but having seen it done on TV, that is the key point that I needed to realize.
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He was worried about the knot not being able to go through the sheave. A needless worry since the knot doesn't HAVE to go through it.

Oh, not all that much...look at the picture, do as the pictures show. Splicing wire rope is harder...

Sure you can...eye splice in one end with a snap or shackle, eye splice in the other end with a thimble :) Even WITHOUT a thimble :) :)
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gregz wrote, on Thu, 25 Sep 2014 03:56:08 +0000:

Here's an example of a 125 foot long clothesline! :)
https://c3.staticflickr.com/3/2943/15188529300_bbedf3ba0c_c.jpg
Actually, it's a cable we put up for a suspension bridge, but, it's at least 50 feet high at the downhill part and only about 15 feet high in the uphill part - but I figured it would serve by way of example that it can be done.
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Jason Marshall wrote:

be coated stainless steel wire, such as they use for lifelines on a boat. But if you bought it thick enough for a clothespin to get a good bite, it would be too inflexible to run through a pulley, unless you had a really big pulley, and in any event, the cost would be extreme.
I think UV protected Dacron line, thick enough for a clothespin to grab, would be your best option in terms of weather resistance and cost, but even that would become stiff after years of exposure.
I used it to hang a bird feeder 12 or 14 years ago, and it still works, but is getting stiff and hard to run through my pulley.
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