What would be the best way to find out the value of a slate pool table?

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My father bought us a standard 8' pool table when we were kids. The legs of the table became unsteady so it has been leaning on a wall in the basement for around 20 years. It was a pretty expensive table and I think it came from Sears. It is so heavy that I don't even trust trying to lean it out to check the top to see what the condition of the felt or the rails are. I think it is a pretty safe bet that they are not in good condition. So really the total value of the table would be the slate and maybe the frame.
What is it worth?
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wrote:

If anyone is interested in replacing a slate for their pool table, I found this link:
http://www.ehow.com/how_7357860_replace-pool-table-slate.html
One of the thing in the "Things you will need" list is A pool table
So if you are planning to do any work on your pool table, make sure to have a pool table.
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On 6/24/2012 3:12 PM, Metspitzer wrote:

Call up someone who does estate sales.
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Thanks for the tip
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If you don't have a name brand, it'll be difficult to determine value. But overall, I don't know of any "Blue Book" type site to determine Billiard values and can only suggest doing a Google search for Poll table values. Also check Ebay and Craigslist to gain a sense of asking prices. Then, you must consider overall condition. Last but not least, value is also based on what someone is willing to pay.
Good luck
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Advertise it on Kijiji or similar site. It's worth exactly what someone is willing to pay for it - no more, and no less.
Or call a billiard supply and ask how much it would cost to buy a replacement for a cracked slate . Start at about half that and you should be close.
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On Sun, 24 Jun 2012 21:03:37 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Thanks
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Thanks
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On Sun, 24 Jun 2012 18:12:35 -0400, Metspitzer wrote:

The normal procedure for determining the value of anything is to haul it to the dump, after which it's guaranteed that shortly after you'll run into someone who will say "oh, I wish you still had that, I would have given you $x for it" :-)
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I wouldn't be so sure.
Granted, the fact that you said it came from Sears may mean that it's not some fancy, high end table that is worth restoring, but you never know.
Think about those rusted out vehicles sitting in barns. An uniformed person might think the "total value" is all in the scrap metal, when in reality they might have a rare, vintage auto worth a lot of money to the right person.
You might want to take some pictures and stop by an antique shop. Many of those establishments have an appraiser on staff or on retainer who might be able to give you a better idea of what it is worth.
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On Mon, 25 Jun 2012 07:34:47 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

It would really surprise me if it was considered valuable as an antique, but that is a good suggestion.
Thanks
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Metspitzer wrote:

There's no possible way that a table sold thru Sears will be considered an antique unless it was bought 50 years ago. Sears has not offered a high-end table in the last 25-30 years. And I'm not very sure they EVER offered a high-end table.
One of my mowing customers has his standard 4x8 table (very good condition and a name brand) for sale at the price of 400 bucks. It lists new for about $1800-$2200.
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I'm trying to find out where I can find someone to tell my howuch a slate is worth it's very very heavy it's over 43yrs old and about 3-5ft long. I live indiana and need to find a place close.
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On Tue, 1 Dec 2015 12:07:06 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

That's a very small pool table! Most pool tables are around 8 ft long.
From reading your message, I dont know if you have the whole table or just the slate. If you have the whole table, call some pool supply strores and ask the what a USED table would cost (your size).
If you only have the slate, it'll probably be hard to find a local buyer, since you dont want to pay the price to ship it, and is not likely an item in demand. Maybe it can be used under a wood stove.... Try Craigslist!
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snipped-for-privacy@charter.net says...

Most common are 7 ft. bar tables and 9 ft. pool hall tables. The very good players prefer to buy a table for home which is the same size as what they would play tournaments on (7/9 ft.).
So that would leave inexperienced players who would purchase such a table. Some of these want a "fancy room decoration" and might rarely play on it. If it is not in good looking condition, nothing fancy, and no "name" on it, then that rules out those buyers.
So you are looking at maybe getting $50 to $200 I would guess.
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wrote:

Most likely I am just wrong about the length. It is regulation size. That may be 7 ft then. I know it is not 9 ft.

Thanks
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As a former owner of a pool/gameroom, this is a bit incorrect. Most tables are 4x8 ---- and there are two sizes --> standard and oversized. A 7' table in 'rough' shape is about useless... give it to anyone willing to haul it off. The rare exception to this is if it is an old Brunswick or a top model of another brand. If the legs and pockets and trim are very ornate -- it's worth a few bucks even being a 7 footer.
I had two 9' tables at my place. Those are usually only used by the 'better' players. If yours is a 4x8, and no name to be found on it, once again -- look at how ornate the legs and edging is on it. If it's a plain jane and no known name brand on it, take the first hundred bucks offered. It's about a hundred bucks for felt and about the same (100-150) to cover labor. As a sidenote, many of the old Sears tables used a honeycomb slate. Those tables are the bottom rung of the ladder.
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On Mon, 25 Jun 2012 13:16:17 -0400, "83LowRider"

Is weight any judge of whether the slate would be honeycomb. The table is very heavy.
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Metspitzer wrote:

No... a piece of slate that size (most tables actually have 3 pieces) will be very heavy regardless. The 7' tables (as well as coin-op tables) are sometimes an exception. Why not take a couple pics and post them?
If the table is in rough shape, you can always remove the felt for a better look. Anyone buying the table would have to re-felt it regardless as it is very unlikely they would be able to remove it from your home in one piece.
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On Mon, 25 Jun 2012 07:51:09 -0700 (PDT), gpsman

I think all that stuff has walked off years ago.
Thanks
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