What work gloves do you use for heavy infestation of poison oak & ivy (covered in urushiol)?

Page 3 of 4  

On Fri, 9 Apr 2010 14:18:37 -0700 (PDT), mike wrote:

I wish! I really do. If you can find a reliable reference that says that, I'd love to read it thoroughly as (see below), it has been proven to be infectius for more than a century after the plants died (dendritic samples in drawers).
The urushiol is in every part of the plant (even tiny hairs on the stem): http://www.curtbeebe.com/docs/biochemistry.html
Only a few molecules are needed to cause a rash: http://www.curtbeebe.com/docs/Urushiol.html )
An amount the size of the tip of a needle can cause a rash: http://www.technuextreme.com/faq.htm
Some assert urushiol is infectious forever: http://www.poison-ivy.org/html/faq.htm "The oil from poison ivy is extremely stable and will stay potent - essentially forever."
Others show examnples where urushiol infectivity lasts a century: http://tinyurl.com/ybkublp "For stability urushiol has few equals-it has been found active in dried plants that date back more than 100 years."
Yet others assert urushiol is infectious only for a few years: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poison_ivy "Urushiol oil can remain active for several years, so handling dead leaves or vines can cause a reaction."

It's way too steep to get a bulldozer or bobcat from what I've been told. It's hard enough to climb in there on foot, as it is.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Apr 9, 2:42 pm, Elmo <dcdraftwo...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

Your plants aren't going to be stored inside, dried. They'll be subject to weather (sun, water, fungus, bugs, bacteria).
Quote: :It usually takes a year or so before the toxic properties weather away." Source: http://www.hort.uconn.edu/ipm/homegrnd/htms/60poisivy.htm
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 9 Apr 2010 14:55:07 -0700 (PDT), mike wrote:

Hi Mike, That's a very interesting article, which says urushiol "is very stable, and dead and dried material is as hazardous to sensitive people as an actively-growing plant. It is equally active in the dead of winter. Many people have caught poison ivy from dead poison ivy plants. It usually takes a year or so before the toxic properties weather away".
Even though the urushiol in poison oak is different than that in poison ivy (http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jo00215a002 ), your point is valid, that the urushiol might "weather away" (whatever that means). I suppose it oxidizes to something other than urushiol.
Interesting ...
I'm digging in google to try to find what that weathering mechanism might be as it's mighty interesting because that might actually be a way to combat it. Maybe we can hasten that 'weathering' to a few days instead of to a few months or years?????
http://www.japanese-antiquities.com/235/japanese-urushi-sons-lidded-birth-bowl / "Urushiol is an oily substance contained in the sap and when it is exposed to humidity and warmth, an enzyme is activated that extracts oxygen from water and supplies it to the urushiol. Then the urushiol solidifies, which forms a hard film."
The Japanese have mastered a way to make Urushiol non inflammatory: http://www.pentrace.net/east/wajima/urushi.html
Even so, the thicket is so thick that a human can't walk through it and it goes over twenty feet high (see the pictures previously posted):
http://img338.yfrog.com/gal.php?g=poisonoakurushiolchapar.jpg
So, I'm not sure how I would even think of applying a herbicide to kill huge amounts plants I can't even get to without hacking my way through them.
But I do thank you for the idea. So far we've gotten a few good ideas. And, if we can find a way to inactivate the urushiol from the toxicodendron in less than a few months' time (i.e., hasten the weathering), we'd all be doing the world a favor!
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 9 Apr 2010 22:14:11 +0000 (UTC), Elmo wrote:

While digging up, I found another reference to centuries-old "preserved" specimens causing contact dermititis in people sensitive to urushiol.
Here's the reference said about PRESERVED specimens (i.e., not weathered): http://www.mdvaden.com/poison_oak.shtml "The urushiol can remain potent for months, even years. One resource records that centuries-old preserved specimens of poison oak caused dermatitis to people sensitive to urushiol. Urushiol can remain active on dead plants for as much as 5 years, and on unwashed clothing for a year or two."
I'm surprised the urushiol remained potent far longer on outdoor plants (5 years) than on indoor unwashed clothing (1 or 2 years); but one take away is that just killing the plant doesn't solve the problem of needing gloves to remove the huge piles of dead plants blocking access.
But, I'm liking the bulldozer idea more and more as we speak ...
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 9 Apr 2010 23:55:44 +0000 (UTC), Elmo

Whatever you do, don't burn the stuff. The smoke is also "active" unless you can get it up over something like 1500C, consistently.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Elmo wrote:

Based on previous threads here, and a few real-world stories- running a bulldozer anywhere near flowing water is fraught with bureaucratic and legal peril, leastways if a neighbor gets a burr up their butt about it, like if you make the water start running muddy, or if the creek supports any lifeforms. Corps of Engineers, state DNR, state and federal EPA, local drain district authority, the list is endless.
No, common sense has nothing to do with it.
Just sayin'
--
aem sends...

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
aemeijers wrote:

Yeah it can get interesting depending on where you are and what you do. The stream that runs behind my place is a "Class 2 trout habitat" Get caught in the stream with any machinery (other than a farm tractor crossing the stream) and the state gets nasty.
So DON'T get CAUGHT!!!!!
--
Steve W.

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Work gloves? Who needs work gloves? I'm lucky enough to be pretty damn near immune to the stuff, and I just pull it out with my bare hands. Ask around -- maybe someone you know is like me, and would be willing to pull it for you in exchange for work on his place, or beer and pizza, or a sawbuck or three...
If you live in the Indianapolis area, maybe we can work something out. Email doug at milmac dot com.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 09 Apr 2010 20:32:26 GMT, Doug Miller wrote:

Hi Doug,
I'm in the chaparral country, nowhere near the lush forests.
But let me advise you of something important ... there are only two kinds of people with respect to poison oak/ivy: - Those who have been sensitized (and therefore who get the rash) ... - And ... those you have yet to be sensitized (but are never immune)!
The bad news (for you) is that you are never immune to cell mediated immunities such as that which urushiol causes - you just haven't been hit with enough oil for your particular immune system to react (lucky you!).
Putting it another way, you just have a "lousy" immune system (luckily for you), which doesn't react to the doses you have encountered so far in your life. But, trust me (look it up if you don't believe me), you WILL get poison oak eventually if you're exposed to the urushiol enough.
Nobody is "immune"; some just haven't gotten a good enough dose to make their immune system react ... and once it reacts ... it never forgets.
Note: If you're on immunosuppressants, then you might not react even after having been sensitized.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Wrong. Some people simply don't react to it (or don't react much). I'm in that category.

That's exactly my point. I'm one of the lucky ones whose immune system won't react unless it gets an almost impossibly high exposure.

The point is that for some people, including me, "enough" is a very, very large amount, much more than it's possible to get.
I once spent an entire day tearing the stuff out of a fenceline, barehanded. By early afternoon, it had gotten hot enough that I stripped off my shirt. I took no precautions whatever -- I'd been exposed to it enough as a teenager, and not reacted, that I had no reason to worry. Shoving the stuff into trashbags, I had my arms in it up to the shoulders. I was wearing cutoff jeans, too, BTW, so no protection below mid-thigh, or above the waist.
That's a hell of a dose.
Four days later, I had one dime-sized spot of rash on my chest, and another on one forearm -- and that was it.
Years later, as I was changing the brakes on our car at the edge of the driveway (again wearing cutoffs) my wife walked up and asked me if I knew I was sitting in poison ivy. Looked down -- huh. So I am. Oh, well. She was surprised I didn't move -- told her I've been sitting on that plant for half an hour already, so it's too late to make a difference.
No reaction.
I'm 52 years old. The episode with the fenceline is the *only* time in my life I've ever had *any* reaction to it.

That simply isn't true.

Neither is that.
My own experience shows that; I *did* react to it, though very, very mildly, after the day on the fenceline, and, although I *know* I've been in contact with it since (the brake job, for example, and just last year pulling weeds) I have never reacted to it again, at all, ever.

No immunosuppressants here.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 09 Apr 2010 23:17:24 GMT, Doug Miller wrote:

Hi Doug,
I'm glad you don't get a serious reaction to poison oak. You're one of the lucky ones.
I did base my statements on research, e.g., see this which said almost exactly what I said: http://www.knoledge.org/oak / "There are only two kinds of people: Those who get Poison Oak, and those who are going to get it."
However, I did read what you wrote which is that you get it very slightly and that you've been heavily exposed many times. (BTW, if you've seen the black marks all over your clothes, as if someone attacked you with a black marker, then you've been heavily exposed, in my opinion.)
Anyway, as I said, I'm very glad you are only slightly reactive to poison oak urushiol. I hope, as you said, that it's a nearly permanent immunity as almost all articles say the apparent immunity changes over time:
http://www.mdvaden.com/poison_oak.shtml "Everybody including the "immune" should be cautious, because "immunity" to poison oak may change. The term "immune" is a bit figurative, because it's the immune system that generates the minor and severe rashes from poison oak."
But, in the end, you probably don't have a whole lot of special effort T-cells for the poison oak allergen. Lucky for you! http://waynesword.palomar.edu/ww0802.htm#natural
Unfortunatly for me, and many others, I get it 100% of the time that cut and visibly oozing poison oak stems come in contact with my skin. My clothes are covered in black marks (see the pictures I originally posted of my gloves, for example, which were only used a few times before they were covered in black marks).
http://img696.yfrog.com/gal.php?gE906740.jpg
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Clothes, hell. I've had them on my skin.

Yeah, me too. :-)

Yep! :-)

My younger son, and my sister-in-law, would have both required hospitalization if they had done what I did. My older son probably would have had much the same response that I did -- essentially none.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There are hand creams on the market that you can apply in advance, and wash off afterward. Mechanics use this type of thing to make hand washing easier at the end of the day. I understand fire fighters also use this stuff when they have to go into a burning area with poison oak.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 9 Apr 2010 19:20:17 -0700, Leo Lichtman wrote:

The use of hand cremes on the knees and ankles might prevent Toxicodendron dermatitis in those unexpected spots.
I sometimes find when the urushiol is so thick, it leaves black oxidized marks on my ankles after a few hours tromping around as noted here: http://www.drreddy.com/poisonivy.html
Then, the Rhus Dermititis rash is almost certain to occur.
If I had put a hand creme all over my body, especially my knees and ankles, maybe it would have prevented these unexpected infections.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Elmo" wrote: (clp) If I had put a hand creme all over my body, especially my knees and ankles,

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Putting it all over the body seems a bit extreme, but--whatever it takes. Realize, of course, that you are comparing a whole body treatment to the wearing of gloves. I would try using the cream on hands, forearms and other areas where you have experienced the problem, and rely on some kind of coveralls for full body protection.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 10 Apr 2010 11:44:13 -0700, Leo Lichtman wrote:

I didn't mention it but I subscribe to the multi-layer approach with respect to the whole body.
So I wear long pants and a long-sleeved shirt under my mechanics overalls (coveralls?). And I wear nitrile gloves under the goatskin gauntlet style mig/tig welding gloves.
Still, I'm so covered in the urushiol catechols that my wrists have visible phenolic black marks from scrapes with the oxidized and polymerized urushiol, especially when it's wet or when I sweat a lot.
So, the hand creme might be a good third layer on my wrists.
About the only part of my body exposed to the elements is my face, neck, and ears ... but for some reason, they don't seem to get the rash as much as my wrists, between my fingers, and on my ankles and toes.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 10 Apr 2010 20:11:31 +0000 (UTC), Elmo

Don't forget your suit of armor and chain mail hauberk and coif.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 10 Apr 2010 01:20:01 GMT, Doug Miller wrote:

Based on what it says in this web site, you and your older son probably react onlty to three or more degrees of saturation on the carbon chain hanging off the urushiol catechol while your son and sinister in law likely react to the unsaturated chain or one or two degrees of saturation:
See http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/topics/Urushiol "The allergic reaction is dependent on the degree of unsaturation of the alkyl chain. Less than half of the general population reacts with the saturated urushiol alone, but over 90% react with urushiol containing at least two degrees of unsaturation (double bonds)."
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 10 Apr 2010 01:20:01 GMT, Doug Miller wrote:

For your sake though, you should not tramp through the poison oak with impugnity.
Notice Wayne himself, in Waynesworld, says he used to be immune ... until ... http://waynesword.palomar.edu/ww0802.htm "Caution: Cutting and sanding poison oak wood is extremely unwise and hazardous--even if you think you are immune to its dermatitis. This is how one of the authors (WPA) was rudely initiated into the ranks of poison oak sufferers, after tramping through it for decades with impunity."
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Apr 9, 2:30 pm, Elmo <dcdraftwo...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

WHATEVER YOU DO DONT BURN IT. THE SMOKE IS LETHAL.
Jimmie
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.