What work gloves do you use for heavy infestation of poison oak & ivy (covered in urushiol)?

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On Fri, 09 Apr 2010 22:53:43 -0500, Martin H. Eastburn wrote:

That's good advice and I already wear Costco nitrile gloves under my pigskin mig-welding gloves.
You can see the box of nitrile gloves in the picture posted previously: http://yfrog.com/jc45906740jx
However, some say urushiol readily permeates latex )i.e., rubber) so I wouldn't recommend rubber latex gloves withought further study.
http://www.drreddy.com/poisonivy.html "urushiol can also penetrate clothes, rubber gloves, and latex gloves. (Heavy-duty vinyl gloves are impervious to urushiol"
http://beatpsoriasis.com/poison-ivy.htm "Urushiol can penetrate latex gloves but not rubber gloves."
http://www.infocusnews.net/content/view/38496/1189 / "use precautions such as vinyl gloves because urushiol can penetrate latex gloves" http://www.naturalpedia.com/URUSHIOL.html "If you're going to be pulling weeds, wear heavy-duty vinyl gloves. The resin may be able to penetrate rubber (latex)"
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Address.invalid> wrote:

Go cheap and just throw them away when you are finished.
That's what I do...I buy the big bag of brown cheapo gloves at Wal*Mart and toss them...Works for me and I'm VERY allergic to that stuff...HTH...Why make it more complicated than it needs to be??
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On Sat, 10 Apr 2010 00:47:32 -0400, benick wrote:

The only problem with that is the typical "work glove" is too short to cover the wrists as can be seen in the original photos posted at http://yfrog.com/jc45906740jx http://img696.imageshack.us/slideshow/webplayer.php?idE906740.jpg
I find my wrists are constantly lacerated by the millions of cut branches, hence, the need for a gauntlet type work glove (harder to find, and more expensive).
Also, the urushiol oil easily penetrates most cloth gloves and some say it can penetrate thin leathers, both of which are likely in el cheapo work gloves.
Good gloves are necessary given the huge amount of poison oak to be cleared is an impenetrable jungle as shown in these photos here http://yfrog.com/9epoisonoakurushiolchaparjx http://img338.imageshack.us/slideshow/webplayer.php?id=poisonoakurushiolchapar.jpg
BTW, I found this article while searching that suggests powders such as starch or flour ... interesting ... http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/chem03/chem03357.htm
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On Fri, 9 Apr 2010 18:30:08 +0000 (UTC), Elmo

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?ItemnumberD68
...or similar from elsewhere
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On Fri, 09 Apr 2010 14:50:16 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Interesting.
I was looking for welders or firefighters "skin" glovs (deerskin, goatskin, kangaroo skin, cowhide, etc.) because of the length (covers the wrists) durability and impermeability to poison oak urushiol; and I hadn't thought of rubber gloves.
The rubber gloves meet some requirements (others need to be tested): - Available in size XL and covers the wrists => It meets this - Impermeable to poison oak/ivy urushiol => certainly meets this - Durable in impenetrable poison oak chaparral => maybe meets this - Remains pliable after repeated washing machine cycles => probably meets - Pliable enough to allow use of hand cutting tool controls => ???
The only thing that worries me with the rubber gloves idea is that I've used sand-blasting rubber gloves before and I've used radioative protection equipment and those thick rubber bloves just don't have much finger feel.
Has anyone used these $7 (Harbor Frieght item 4468-7VGA) blasting rubber gloves outside in the chaparral that can tell us what the finger feel is like on typical power tools? http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?ItemnumberD68
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On Fri, 9 Apr 2010 19:01:52 +0000 (UTC), Elmo

For $6.99 a pair, you don't wash them. Then again, they have a smooth rubber surface that can be rinsed with a hose or wiped with a sponge.
I can't imagine ANY leather or cloth glove being better protection than what these offer.
For $6.99 a pair, just BUY a pair and see how you like them.
I have some similar gloves and poison Ivy is exactly what I use them for. I manage to operate my brush cutter and chain saw while wearing them. They do really screw me up, however, when I try to crochet or play the violin while wearng them.
What you need are gloves that are chemical resistant forst and foremost. Your problem is needing protection from a chemical.
Thes blasting gloves are especially good because thorns can't penetrate them either.
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On Fri, 09 Apr 2010 14:50:16 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

That's the 'hazmat" glove type I was thinking of - but many did not have the textured grip.
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On 4/9/2010 2:30 PM, Elmo wrote:

A chemical worker would use rubber gloves that are washable. Any leather is going to be permeable or hard to wash.
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Elmo wrote:

NONE of the above. ANYTHING that can absorb the oils is no good.
Visit a fire equipment store and buy a pair of gauntlet style extrication gloves. These are made for use with power equipment, BUT they hape a moisture barrier inside them which stops oils, gas, blood, water from getting though and reaching you.
To protect farther up the arms you could buy a pair of the sleeves sold there as well.
--
Steve W.
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On Fri, 09 Apr 2010 15:38:34 -0400, Steve W. wrote:

Interesting.
That's the kind of information I didn't have that I was looking for!
Most extrication gloves are over $100 per pair but some are more reasonable for your average homeowner: http://www.gomed-tech.com/catalog/mtr-reflective-extrication-gloves.htm http://www.chibaglovescanada.com / http://www.hansenfire.com/glovesWildland.htm http://www.urbanhart.com/shopsite/protectivegear_rescuegloves.html
I like the "elastic cuff" and the fact they're available in XL sizes. Some even have a silica gell over the ulna nerve. I'm wondering if the ample "kevlar" and "cordura" and "safecut" and "reflex" will keep out the chemical urushiol oil though ... as they don't seem to use leather or rubber.
Also, hopefully these expensive but intriguing extrication gloves are washable as the urushiol is infectious even after a century outside!
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Elmo wrote:

The outer layer offers NO protection other than normal abrasive resistance. It is the layers under it that stop the oils and other problem items.
They can be decontaminated for most other things so I would say washing them isn't a problem.
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On Fri, 09 Apr 2010 18:27:35 -0400, Steve W. wrote:

Perfect! I'm gonna get me a pair of these extrication gloves!
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So, Elmo, why aren't you just killing these awful plants with glyphosate? Why bother wrestling with them?
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On Fri, 9 Apr 2010 13:32:25 -0700 (PDT), mike wrote:

Probably I didn't explain the problem sufficiently.
Maybe these photographs help: http://img338.imageshack.us/slideshow/webplayer.php?id=poisonoakurushiolchapar.jpg
I hope they show the problem. Basically I'm trying to clear a large area of the plant. Even when dead, the poison oak plants have shown themselves to be infectious for a century. All parts of the plant, from the roots to the stems to the leaves contain the irritating urushiol. http://yfrog.com/9epoisonoakurushiolchaparjx
So, if I kill them; they're still there. The poison oak thickets are so congested that a human can not possibly walk through the chaparral. The chaparral is like a jungle.
http://img338.imageshack.us/g/poisonoakurushiolchapar.jpg
The only way through it is to hack your way through. The vines and bushes go up maybe twenty feet so what I'm really doing is tunneling a "Cumberland Gap" through them. Even when you walk on the ground, you're actually on a foot high crunching mass of old vines, which your feet sink into every few steps, allowing the poison oak urushiol to get at your ankles and lower legs.
At first I hacked away with a machete, then I used pruning shears to cut the inch-thick branches; and then the chain saw to cut through the non-poison-oak trees and bushes which the poison oak is intertwined with.
I get maybe ten feet an hour but I have acres and acres to complete. I don't mind the work; actually I enjoy it. But, as with any good adversary, it pays to protect yourself from its defenses as you work your way through the thickets.
In summary, unless I'm missing the biodegradation part, killing the plant does absolutely nothing (well, maybe it eliminates the leaves) when you're hacking your way through a thicket of vastly intertwined species of stems that are at times thicker than your wrist.
Maybe I'm wrong, but, killing them won't remove them. They're so thick, and interwined with good species, that the only way to remove them selectively is to cut through them.
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On Apr 9, 1:57pm, Elmo <dcdraftwo...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

No. The irritating oils completely break down in about a year after death.
Acres of poison ivy infested thicket? Yikes. I'd be tempted to rent a bulldozer to clear the whole damn thing, and replant from scratch.
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P.S. I'd at least want to bulldoze a path so I could use herbicides.
From the stuff I've read, pulling poison ivy from dry soil will not be very effective. It'll just regrow vigorously from root parts left behind. You're going to have to find a way to apply herbicides.
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On Fri, 9 Apr 2010 14:39:00 -0700 (PDT), mike wrote:

I'd love that too! Unfortunately, the access to the areas I'm clearing is very steep! I have to climb down a rope that I posted in the ground after cutting through the tangle of poison oak.
What steepness of a soft hillside can a bulldozer go down?
I'm not sure how to measure the steepness of the access points, but, I'd say a six-foot tall human is below the lip in about 9 or ten feet. That is, in only a few steps (about four or so), you're already below where you started. It's pretty steep.
I'll see if I can snap a picture of the steepness to give you an idea. If a bobcat can get down a cliff, I'd LOVE to rent one and do it myself!
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Elmo wrote:

I've taken dozers down some pretty steep grades. How long is the graded area before it levels off? A dozer with a winch on it would do the job easily.
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On Fri, 09 Apr 2010 18:33:34 -0400, Steve W. wrote:

A small golf-cart sized bulldozer WOULD be very nice indeed! The area I'm clearing is along a brook so all I really need is to bulldoze one side of the brook for a few hundred yards (maybe about 500 yards in length).
I'm not sure how to measure steepness, but, I can throw a rock and hit the top of trees at the bottom. I'm guessing that I'm thirty to fifty feet above the bottom when I'm at the top. I'd say the bottom is about twenty or thirty feet away from the top in terms of horizontal distance.
Can a small golf-cart sized bulldozer get down that?
Right now, by hand, I can only cut the seasonal stream itself. That is, while I'm standing in the middle of the foot-wide stream, I can hack straight above me and cut the poison oak vines enough so that I can walk down the center of the stream. The opening above the water is about 3 feet wide.
The banks are so steep, that even on the banks that I've cleared, you only have a foot or two to place your feet and you constantly have to grab a tree branch so as to not fall into the channel. I was going to dig at it with a shovel to cut it away but a bulldozer the size of a golf cart would be perfect.
The stream is never level but it's pretty flat at the bottom for most of those 500 yards. I'd say the first 30 or 50 feet are the killer in terms of steepness. If I can get the golf-cart sized bulldozer down and then back up, that would be very nice.
I'll check if u-haul rents bulldozers...
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A bulldozer can go down a very steep slope. The problems occur when you want to go back up. However the dozer comes with a blade attached so you can make a road to the bottom. Some come with winches on the back. The winch will allow you to manuver up and down the slope as well provided there is a handy stump to fasten to. Brush cutters can be mounted on excavators. The excavator will have the ability to reach quite a distance. You need some machinery to clear the land and then you will need to apply a herbicide such as Garlon several times to kill the new sprouts.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xpYEr0h8f8s


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qodc4bKR5gY

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