What will dissolve Shoe Goo quickly?

Anyone know of something that will quickly dissolve cured Shoe Goo - the stuff in squeeze tube that cures to a rubber-like material?
I've tried paint remover - both citrus-based and the automotive stuff, acetone, ligher fluid, even gasoline since I'd read that it dissolves Shoe Goo. It seems to soften it some but it's got a lot of fumes and doesn't really work all that effectively from what I've seen.
I'm re-doing some sneakers so I don't want to also dissolve the sneaker material that the sole layer adheres to.
Thanks for all input.
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Put gasolene in a covered pot, then put it on the stove on high for 38 minutes, goo will be gone.
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ransley wrote:

So will stove, kitchen, house...
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wrote:

Geesh!, some people are so negative.
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I don't know the exact ingeridents. But it's likely that nothing will dissolve it once it's cured; I'd bet it's a superglue-type polymerisation.
It might be a good idea to post the ingeridents if it says anywhere - or does anyone else know?
Andrew Usher
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Andrew Usher wrote:

Not sure it's cured and years ago when I used some, I seem to recall a chlorinated solvent like tetrachloroethylene or ethylene dichloride. Think you can buy paint removers with methylene chloride.
As a polymer it will take long time to dissolve or plasticize enough for mechanical removal.
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did you call the 800 number on the side of the tube and ask them?
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It's a silicone that polymerizes when exposed to the moisture in the air. Chances are that anything you use to remove it will dissolve the shoe and leave the Shoe Goo. Your best bet is a good sharp Xacto knife.
Dangerous Bill
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James wrote:

composition of the item it is being removed from. I did a google search on 'shoe goo msds" and came up with a link that provides an email addy to the co. for requesting MSDS: http://www.eclecticproducts.com/SHOEGOODirections.htm
...and a link for technical data: http://www.eclecticproducts.com/_tds/sg_tds.pdf (uncured, remove w/acetone; cured, remove by cutting or scraping. "DO NOT dry-clean Shoe GOO because dry cleaning solvent breaks down the cured adhesive.")
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Home Depot didn't have Toluene (I've also heard it'll rejuvenate dried out magic markers) MEK definitely does the job. Nasty stuff though - definitely outdoor use only. I've got the shoe set up outside on a table, upside down - lay a cloth over the shoe bottom, pour the MEK over the cloth holding my breath, then form a sheet of tinfoil over it to impede evaporation. After a while it turns the Shoe Goo to mush, which I scrape off with a folding knife, which seems to be the perfect tool - use the flatter part of the blade to clean the broad areas and curved depressions, the pointy part to get in the corners.
Thanks!
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