What use is WiFi on a Costco Viso TV?

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What use is WiFi on a TV screen?
A relative of mine called, who was told "something" by Costco, that their Visio TVs have WiFi and therefore she wouldn't need the "box" whatever that is.
I don't have cable, nor even a TV, but I suspect that "box" is something that was added when they switched from Analog to Digital (or maybe it's a descrambler).
They said they have to pay the cable company for a second box (the first one is free), so, it's not a modem (because you'd only need one modem).
Anyway, my basic question, for you, is "what use is WiFi in a TV"?
Note that I can easily see that bluetooth is useful, since you can then use that TV with a keyboard; but what good is WiFi in a TV screen at home?
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so you can connect to the internet and watch Youtube, netflix, etc.
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On Thu, 03 Sep 2015 04:47:02 -0700, taxed and spent wrote:

Maybe I don't understand. Actually, I don't understand.
To watch youtube, you need a browser, which is usually a program compiled for a certain computer, which runs a certain operating system, and which has a certain byte order and memory structure and a whole bunch of other things associated with a "computer".
Is the TV acting as a "computer"? If so, what operating system is the TV?
What browser does it use? What architecture is that TV browser compiled for?
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On Thursday, September 3, 2015 at 9:08:18 AM UTC-5, Ewald Böhm wrote:

Yes, the "Smart" TV is a computer...Samsung is Tizen OS (not sure about Viz io).
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The newer smart TVs have their own built in inerface . Maybe you have heard of the devices like ROKU or the one from Amazon. Anyway it lets the TV connect to the internet so if you have say Direct TV you can get movies and other shows on demand bystreaming off the internet. I don't know what system they use,but my TV lets me surf the web. It is awful slow to do with the remote,but I think I could hook up a mouse and keyboard to it if I wanted to.
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On Thu, 3 Sep 2015 10:21:58 -0400, "Ralph Mowery"

My Samsung will take a USB mouse/keyboard but it is pretty clunky searching the web. They already have most, if not all of the streaming service interfaces built into the software. Some still require that you need to go online with your PC to get the authorization code (HBO for sure). There may be another way to get it but it is easy on a PC.
The local FIOS (Century link) TV offering also has a WiFi interface to the TV box but I am not sure a smart TV can access it.
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I am not using FIOS, I still have POTS and Dish.
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On Thu, 03 Sep 2015 10:49:10 -0400, gfretwell wrote:

I guess a USB wired mouse and keyboard would be useful.
Do most of these WiFi TVs have the ability to accept a typical USB mouse and keyboard?
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On Thu, 03 Sep 2015 10:21:58 -0400, Ralph Mowery wrote:

I don't have direct tv. My router does not have a coax input.
I thought that was a coax cable coming out of all those direct tv antennas I see on houses.
If the output of Direct TV is coax, how does that coax get "into" your network?
It can't go through the router. How does it get into your router without a coax connector on the router?
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On Saturday, September 5, 2015 at 3:08:13 PM UTC-4, Ewald Böhm wrote:

I don't have DirectTV, but I believe the sat antenna is connected to a receiver which then has traditional output for a TV, eg HDMI and that is how it gets connected to a TV. That's how it worked in the past. And if you're going to access streaming video from the internet, the wifi connection is between the DirectTV receiver and your router, the video then goes from the receiver to the TV via the same connection, eg HDMI as it would if the reception was via satellite.
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On Sat, 05 Sep 2015 17:57:53 -0500, Charlie Hoffpauir wrote:

Oh. That explains it!
So, the coax cable that comes out of the dish on the roof then goes into a "box" which has, as outputs, either coax or RJ45 or a wifi antenna?
Is that correct?
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On Saturday, September 5, 2015 at 10:49:38 PM UTC-4, Ewald Böhm wrote:

What's adding to the confusion is you keep bundling everything together as "outputs". The satellite receiver has traditional outputs that connect to the TV, eg HDMI or component video and audio. It also has connection to your network via Ethernet or Wifi. If by "coax" you mean the traditiona l cable TV type of coax cable, I doubt it has such an output, because I don't see what it would be used for today.

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On Thursday, September 3, 2015 at 10:08:18 AM UTC-4, Ewald Böhm wrote:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smart_TV
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This message is in MIME format. The first part should be readable text, while the remaining parts are likely unreadable without MIME-aware tools.
--8323328-1852352606-1441294695=:8866 Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: QUOTED-PRINTABLE
On Thu, 3 Sep 2015, Ewald Bhm wrote:

conversion, so they might as well allow it to be used as a more general purpose computer.
Both my DTV sets run Linux. A subset, but it's there.
My blu-ray player runs Linux too, as does my TomTom One GPS. It's free, and yet provides a full OS for building on top of.
Michael
--8323328-1852352606-1441294695=:8866--
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On Thursday, September 3, 2015 at 11:37:50 AM UTC-4, Michael Black wrote:

It's not clear to me that you need a CPU to handle the conversion of the digital bitstream to analog. It would seem that a dedicated chip or chipset would be more far more suited to the application.
You do need a CPU to handle the human interface and supervise the other chips. I'd think that's the CPU that's running the WEB/wifi interface.
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On Thu, 3 Sep 2015 08:45:44 -0700 (PDT), trader_4

Everything is a CPU these days. It is cheaper to write software and use an off the shelf CPU chip than to design a purpose built chip. Fixing mistakes is a lot easier too. That is why things as mundane as a washing machine or microwave timer is a CPU. There is a processor in my "dumb" Samsung.
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On 9/3/2015 9:23 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

That depends on the functionality you intend in the product. Note that CPUs go out of production just like "dedicated chips"...

<grin> When was the last time you GOT an update to your microwave oven software? The GPS *software* (not MAPS) in your car? Any of the dozens of ECU's in your vehicle? The controller in your furnace? You washing machine/dryer/dishwasher?
Fixing is a misnomer. *Changing* is a better description. Manufacturers make *changes* (going forward) which may (or may not) "fix" problems. But, folks *with* those problems end up living with them. I.e., the CPU doesn't buy the consumer anything!

There's a processor in your mouse. Another in our keyboard. Another in your CD/DVD drive. Another in your network interface. etc.
(Welcome to *my* world! :> )
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On Thu, 03 Sep 2015 09:32:59 -0700, Don Y

You can still buy 8080 chips but these people are using a standard PIC of some sort.

It is still easier to fix the ones on the line. There are flash changes for cars and you certainly see a lot of microcode upgrades on a smart TV.

the customer is debatable.

My original point, thanks
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On 9/3/2015 12:13 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

How about SC/MP's? 2650's? 8x300's? A bazillion *specific* 8051 derivatives? etc.
In the 70's and 80's, the MPU market was all about "second sources"... you wanted to have (at least one) backup vendors for the parts that you'd design into a product. Nowadays, I don't think there are any parts that are made by two different vendors that are "pin compatible".

Yes. But not much help for the folks who already purchased the "previous bug-set".

Only *smart* (network connected) TV's. And, only if you have it connected to the 'net. At the same time, you are at the mercy of the manufacturer to *not* leave you with a LESS DESIREABLE product than the one you purchased. Or, *not* install additional spyware, etc.
Imagine coming to work and finding your computer has been "upgraded" overnight, without your forewarning. What does that do to productivity?
It's one thing if the upgrades fix broken behaviors. But, more often than not, they *change* behaviors -- often in BIG ways!

If you factor in the cost of added (user) complexity and dubious functionality, I wonder if there *is* a net improvement!
In the 70's, we embraced MPU's as a means of replacing dedicated logic to achieve comparable/improved performance at reduced cost. But, this quickly got out of hand. "Feeping Creaturism" took over and folks started cramming *too* much functionality into things that weren't intended to have that level of complexity. E.g., our microwave has buttons that we've NEVER PRESSED! In 15+ years!! Likewise, the "probe" that allows the oven to monitor the interior temperature of <whatever> it's cooking... never been used, I doubt I could even tell you where it's *stored*! But, the probe, the connector, the electronics and the software were all added to the cost of the microwave.
New cars have support for XM built in. What if I never want an XM subscription? How do I get "credit" for the extra, unused, potential for bugs/failure/complexity increases that the "feature" has cost me?
What is the cost of providing those buttons (tangible hardware cost) and the software behind them? I.e., we've bought features that we'll never use -- and didn't really have a choice in the matter!
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On Thu, 03 Sep 2015 12:25:55 -0700, Don Y

You are preaching to the choir here. I like hard wired circuits vs processors but nobody listens to me. My spa controller is 4xxx CMOS and my pool/solar controller is very old school with a 24 hour timer motor, 3 cams with microswitches and very simple switch and relay logic.to control 5 valve servos
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