What type of spray for Carpenter ants?

Page 1 of 2  
I am being invaded by what I am told are carpenter ants.
They are similar in size to fire ants but do not bite.
What they do is to IRRITATE me by getting on my body, my counter tops, etc., etc.
Is there a product that I can mix with water so as to spray them?
TIA
Lewis
*****
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you have carpenter ants you have a bigger problem than the ants irritating you. Carpenter ants destroy wood and if they are inside your house, they are almost certainly nesting inside the wood of your house. The destruction, if left unchecked, is similar to termites.
Spraying them is unlikely to solve the problem. It will only effect the ants you hit, not the nest. I've had success with Terra liquid bait. The ants feed on it and take it back to the nest, ultimately killing the whole nest. It comes in little clear plastic tray like packages.
The other alternative is to call in a pro. They typically spray a product into wall cavities after drilling holes and also use a powder around the perimeter.
Keeping debis, vegetation, etc away from the wood of the outside of the house also helps. As does making sure you don't have the outside wet due to poor drainage, leaves piling up, etc.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Similar, but not exactly the same. Carpenter ants don't actually EAT the wood as termites do. They treat the wood like regular ants treat dirt: they hollow it out to make nests - and carry the sawdust outside.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Talstar One. eBay.
C-ants typically run to and nest in the highest point in the house (although there may be more than one nest) so a thorough application to the entire structure according to label directions is required.
The thing to remember about ants is, just because you don't see them doesn't mean they're not there.
The other thing to know is a half-assed job might stress a colony and cause them to split. You won't see them for a while, then they'll suddenly be back and more numerous. ----
- gpsman
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/9/2012 7:54 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

...
...
Spraying the ones you see ain't the answer as others said -- you need to bait them and eliminate the colon[y|ies].
Amdro Ant Block is listed for carpenter ants and multiple other species...Amdro Fire Ant bait is most excellent for them and others; we don't have carpenter ants that I've ever seen out here so can't say specifically but I'd give them a thumbs up on comparative basis...
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 9 Aug 2012 05:54:58 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com"

Boric acid works but if it were my house, I'd call an exterminator. Carpenter ants will destroy a house. If you see them, it's already a serious problem.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/9/2012 10:43 AM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

I disagree...calling an exterminator MIGHT help to identify the pest and usually includes free estimates. Destroy a house? Unlikely!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

That's really not true. Back when I did home repair for a living, I had a guy call me about a leaky flat roof, which was the entire kitchen. This was built as an addition from the main house. When I opened that roof from the underside (drywall removed), that entire roof structure was eaten away by the ants, and that made the center of the roof sag, thus made the water problem worse. Ants fell like a heavy rainstorm. It was the most disgusting job I ever did. We removed the entire roof, only to find the walls were also full of ants. We demolished that whole part of the house and rebuilt it from the foundation up, using all treated lumber and made a gable roof rather than the flat one. The owner had a professional exterminator come too, because as the thing was being demolished, ants were running everywhere in the rest of the house. The job was finished at a huge cost to the guy.
A year later he called me again. This time his bathroom ceramic tile was falling off the walls. Well, upon removing a few tiles, I found the drywall was all falling apart and after removing it, the walls were full of carpenter ants. The entire bathroom was demolished from the inside, the half of the wall studs had to be replaced, particularly on the exterior wall, and around the shower. This meant replacing the siding on the entire house, because the existing siding could not be matched. The exterminators came again, and had to come on a regular basis after that.
Some years later I got a call from that guy. He had moved, and wanted me to do a few small repairs at his new house. He said that the neighboring homes were also infested by the old house, and the exterminators were spraying all the houses in that area. He said he sold the place and moved, after spending a fortune on the place for repairs and the continued cost of exterminators. He said he moved entirely because of that ant problem.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

My carpenter ant invasion involved finding a bunch of little satellite nests around the house and most were not really in a wet place. One was in a plastic diskette caddy that was bone dry. One in the coffee maker but not where the water goes and one in our bed. (10 on the yuck factor scale)
We were chasing them for a month until one morning my wife went out to get the paper and saw them swarming out of the mulch next to the house. (winged guys) I mixed up a 5 gallon bucket of poison, drenched the whole bed and we didn't see any more carpenter ants. The mulch went out with the horticulture that weekend, No more mulch for us.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's your house but you're crazy. They *will* destroy a house.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Quite right. They won't destroy the house, but can do so much structural damage that you will be forced to remove major parts of the structure yourself. Happened to me a few years ago, and a 15' x 18' addition to the family palace wound up in the Dumpster. Source for the ants was a rather rotted old white maple and a substandard roofing job on a near flat roof.
Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

To be clear, the moisture that attracts the ants is what is destroying your house, the ants are just a symptom. I didn't have any wet wood and II still had the ants. After the ant invasion I did a total remodel of that end of the house, down to concrete and block. No sign of wet wood was found. My wet wood was the mulch, right outside that wall,.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/10/2012 2:29 PM, Joe wrote:

Where is the house located? Any chance there were termites in the building first? Regular termite inspections?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Here's a link with a lot of good information: http://unexco.com/carpants.html .
They can also be coming into your house from a tree or trees outside. If so, you can usually figure that out by watching the ants and see what path they are taking. I've done that and it works.
I also bought a product called Advance Granular Carpenter Ant Bait and it worked perfectly for me every time (on different properties). I placed it at the base of the tree that was the source of the problem and the carpenter ants disappeared. I happen to live near the exterminating company that has the above website and I went there in person and bought the stuff. It is relatively expensive, but it was what I needed, so I got it.
Here's their link for buying the product online from them: http://www.unexco.net/store/bscview.mv . But, read what the page says -- that it won't work if the source and cause of the problem is moisture. It was the right product for me because the source of the problem was (each time) a nest in a nearby tree.
Given what the website says, my guess is that there are other carpenter ant bait products out there that would probably also work just as well and probably cost a lot less. The concept is (according to them) is that baiting works because it kills the nest without causing the ants to abandon ship and form new nests.
I have no connection with this company and don't know them personally. I am just providing this information in case it helps.
Good luck.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/9/2012 8:54 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Okay, first of all carpenter ants are NOT similar in size to fire ants. CAs are much larger. CAs nest in damaged/rotted wood, indoors or out, and including old termite tunnels. Are you in warm climate with fire ants? IF you have CA's, they aren't difficult to get rid of, as getting rid of the dead wood has done it for me (in condo, after others had dumped bags and bags of poison all over). We cleared away debris and dead wood from landscaping, made repairs to damaged wood on building and the ants were gone. CAs are pretty big, I'd guess about 1/3"....the forage around dusk and are fairly easy to follow back to nest. If you have rather ordinary small ants, try Terro or similar off-brand....most hardware stores carry some version of it, and it is usually a small bottle of just syrup and boric acid. Placed alongside trails, it attracts ants fairly quickly and is taken back to the nest. Among the pest fighting methods, include thorough cleaning of floors, cabinets, sticky containers, pet food crumbs/bowls. If the problem is a new one, and you are in a drought area (or unusually heavy rainfall), ants may come indoors seeking moisture or having been driven from nests by flooding. CA's also nest in trees, so a good idea to clear limbs (especially dead or damaged) that might contact the roof.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thank you. I was going to say the same thing. The only thing fire ants & CA's have in common is the reddish brown color, otherwise they are as different as day & night. Which makes me wonder what the OP really has problems with.
I live rural and have cedar trees dying all over the place. Almost every one has CA's nesting in the trunk. I'm wondering at what stage they're invading the trees, causing the tree to die in order to have a nesting site or moving in after it dies? The trees are definitely not rotted as standing cedar rarely rots. especially not this many 6-10" diameter trees.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/10/2012 3:39 PM, Red wrote:

Hold the presses......there is a variety of CAs that is small. I did a lot of research when I worked on correcting problems at our condo in Florida. At the time, the info on U of Fla website was specific for Florida CAs and those were not causing damage but were nesting in already damaged structures and rotten or dead limbs outdoors. This link has more info and includes a newer CA with limited occurrence in FL but more in other southern states. Good idea for the OP to catch a few of the ants and take them to local extension service or to find info about ants in his locale. Most extension services have thorough info about pests, including current methods of elimination. Here is the link again: http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/urban/ants/fl_carpenter_ants.htm

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The carpenter ant's I'm (too) familiar with are jet black.

Carpenter ants need water. The nest in places that are already compromised but they take it downhill fast from there.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Fire ant: 2 mm to 6 mm Carpenter ant: 6.4 mm to 25 mm
Identify _correctly_ first.
If you have carpenter ants, you must eliminate the source of moisture, they go after wet or damp wood.
Nothing else will work.
--
Dan Espen

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/9/2012 11:19 AM, Dan Espen wrote:

You are right, but it is hard to convince people to look for rotted wood. We had numerous spots around our condo, including palm trees. We had very large, old hedges with dead limbs at the bottom where they had been pruned....I poured some water with Dawn down the hollowed out wood and CAs came pouring out, carrying their eggs/larva...interesting critters. When they bite, they can hang on, but didn't get any of those; only fire ant stings.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.