What type of plastic is a shroud?

What type of plastic is a shroud? (The one used around a fan in front of a car radiator). Mine has a crack which I want to fix using some sort of epoxy or JB Weld, but some plastics can not be glued. I'm not sure how to determine what type of plastic this is????
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On 9/3/2013 12:42 PM, snipped-for-privacy@toolshed.com wrote:

it's almost impossible to find out without expensive tests. it could be almost anything.
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On 9/3/2013 2:42 PM, snipped-for-privacy@toolshed.com wrote:

What's lost w/ a little epoxy and see if it'll hold? Always can just try a small spot on the surface somewhere that's out of the way and see if it sticks or just pops off after dry.
Depending on the crack size/location if thought it really was or was going to be a problem I'd consider whether could use an exterior patch of thin sheet metal w/ a pop rivet or two or similar mechanical repair if the epoxy thing didn't work well...
Or, look carefully -- the shroud on several of my more recent vehicles has been two pieces, to upper of which, in particular is relatively simple to remove and possible not terribly difficult to find used replacement for not that much outlay...
--



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On Tue, 03 Sep 2013 14:42:41 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@toolshed.com wrote:

It looks like HDPE
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On Tue, 03 Sep 2013 16:41:45 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

If it is, epoxy is not going to work. I'd drill the crack to stop it and use a mechanical fix as dbp described. Put a blob of different glues and see if any stick to it.
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On 9/3/2013 3:47 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

The drill stress relief hole is a good addendum, thanks...
--


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On 9/3/2013 4:41 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I don't think that adhesives work well on HDPE but Hazard Fraught sells a plastic welding kit that might work...
nate
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote in wrote:

For some reason I'm not seeing the original post in this thread.
Automotive plastics like fan shrouds are often ABS. Sometimes it says so somewhere on the part..
--
Tegger

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On 9/3/2013 5:54 PM, Tegger wrote:

I'd suspect ABS too and even PVC pipe cement might work.
HDPE essentially can't be glued.
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Mancave:
Fixing your old shroud is as much work as replacing it with another used shroud.
I'd phone whatever company sells your kind of car locally and ask to speak to their Parts department. They will tell you what model years the manufacturer used that particular shroud, and how you can tell the model year from the car's serial number.. Then, just go check your local auto wrecking yards and see if you can find an identical shroud.
My experience here in Winnipeg is that a fan shroud for a car would probably cost $20 to $30 at an auto wrecker.
--
nestork


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On 9/3/2013 4:54 PM, Tegger wrote:

Most plastic parts now have a code or molded in letters spelling out what type of plastic was used in its manufacture to facilitate recycling. It's even on milk jugs. I suppose the OP can find the label that can show what type of plastic it is then look it up online. ^_^
http://www.thistothat.com/
TDD
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On 9/3/13 6:13 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

Wouldn't it be simpler if the OP just used duck tape? He can use gorilla tape if it's on a big, heavy vehicle.
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On 9/3/2013 6:28 PM, Dean Hoffman > wrote:

I thought gorilla tape was only used to fix gorillas? O_o
TDD
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On 09/03/2013 12:42 PM, snipped-for-privacy@toolshed.com wrote:

First step would be to contact the manufacturer. As for a fix, I would be reluctant to rely on an adhesive alone, preferring instead to use fasteners to attach a piece of sheet metal along (and beyond) the crack. For a more permanent and solid repair, you could sandwich your adhesive between the patch and the shroud for extra strength.
BTW, you can always test an adhesive by putting a dab on the material and coming back after a few days to see how easily it scrapes off. I would start with something like a PVC cement or E6000 and go from there. Epoxy can be brittle, and might not be the best thing for a shroud that is subject to vibration and flexing.
Jon
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On Tuesday, September 3, 2013 5:35:01 PM UTC-4, Jon Danniken wrote:

Crazy glue works on a lot of plastics, at least in my experience. That's what I would try.
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On Tue, 03 Sep 2013 14:42:41 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@toolshed.com wrote:

I decided it was HDPE, for what that's worth.
Our Cavalier was in a fender-bender a couple of years ago. It had signicant splits in the inner fender (aka splash shield), air intake duct, and window washer bottle, etc. Glue did nothing. Instead, I 'welded' them with a soldering iron. I just grooved the joints with the iron, and then 'swirled' the adjacent material to fill it over. We kept the car another 2 years, and these held up.
I've used that technique on other plastics. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't. But, it seemed good on the car. Try googling <weld plastic with soldering iron>
G
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On Tue, 03 Sep 2013 14:42:41 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@toolshed.com wrote:

I used that fiberglass and resin kit stuff form the autoparts store on one and it worked great, then painted it black.
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On Tuesday, September 3, 2013 12:42:41 PM UTC-7, snipped-for-privacy@toolshed.com wrote:

Don't use JB Weld or other epoxies; they don't work well except on polyester. Even super glue doesn't work, but worse it can prevent the right glue from working. A lot of plastic car parts are marked HDPE, UHMWPE, ABS, PVC, PC, PP, or ABS + PC. I'm guessing the radiator shroud is HDPE or ABS.
Apply some lacquer thinner or carburetor/throttle body spray, and if the plastic dissolves its ABS, PVC, PC or a blend of those two. ABS and PVC glue really well, but with PC you have only one shot because the plastic changes to something that can't be glued.
Plastics that don't dissolve usually have to be welded back together with a soldering iron or wood burning iron (has nonstick tip) and a scrap of the same material. PC dissolves but is usually better fixed by welding it. HDPE doesn't weld as well as PC or nylon, so you may have to melt some metal screen into the cracked area with a heat gun. Look into Kayak repair because Kayaks are made of HDPE.
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