What tool to use to cut stair nose?

I am thinking to put some 5/16" hardwood floor on my stairs. I have to cut off the nose from the 1" ply treads in order to put the hardwood nose on it.
Some web site I visited suggested to cut the nose with a circular saw. But I did some cutting with a cheap ($40) Sears Craftsman circular saw before,and I never cut anything straight, both horizontally and vertically. I wonder if it would make a difference with a more expensive one. And I would avoid to use the circular saw if I can.
Would a cheap reuter or recip saw cut the 1" ply nose? I don't have much experience with wordwork. But I can't find a contractor just doing that.
I may also need that tool for a sink cutout on the kitchen counter.
Thanks for any help.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Of the tools you mentioned, the circ saw with a rip guide, sharp blade and slow motion will cut the straightest line. I take it these are open stairs? I ask because a circ saw is going to stop cutting about 1.25" from a perpendicular wall or obstruction.
Colbyt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Colbyt wrote:

Thanks.
The stair I have is not open. There are stringers on both sides.
Aside from being a bit nervious on circular saw, I am also concerned that I might cut into a riser below when cutting the nose off.
Do a good curcular saw ($100+) and the cheap one I have ($40) make big difference for this job? What is the difference between them anyway?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<< a circ saw is going to stop cutting about 1.25" from a perpendicular wall or obstruction. >>
Finish it off with a flush cut handsaw, HTH
Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

rec.woodworking is a good newsgroup for this kind of question.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Every power tool I can think of will stop cutting when the body of the runs into the side of the stairs. A good circular saw is a good choice; forget the recip saw.
You could rough cut it with the cheap circular saw & then finish up with a flush cutting router bit that has bearing to guide against the lower riser.
You still have to contend with the "un-cut" section at each end of the tread.
Sharp chisel & patience could do the end work. How many treads? 12?
since you're covering the treads with flooring, could you pull out the treads & rip the nose off on a table saw & re-install?
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

rough cut it, then shape using a belt sander. they make sanders that can get very close to edges (using a very small front roller). be prepared for an immense amount of dust.
regards, charlie cave creek, az
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Charles Spitzer wrote:

I am dealing with a ply stair, so I can't chisel. Sanding out that last part is not easy, I guess.
What I was thinking is use a drill bit (drill saw) and cut through the parts near the stringers. Then sand off the rough part.
I have 12 treads. This is a stair to the basement.If this is successful, I'll try to rip out the carpet on the stair leading to the upper floor, and put the hardwood in.
What kind of router do you think I should get, considering this is one or two time job? I am still trying to avoid using a circular saw for this job.
Do you think 5/16" hardwoord at: http://www.ifloor.com/productdisplay.html?item_id 1499&N=3+138 is a good choice for stair?
Thanks.
y.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Why don't you take some 3/4 stock and use a 3/4 ball bit and route the curve of the bullnose in reverse and then nail and glue it on and then sand it flat. max

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
someone wrote:

Sharpen your chisel?
Use a flush cutting blade in your jigsaw? Here's a picture of Vermont American's version:
http://www.farm-home.com/images/jb59/25839259c.jpg
R, Tom Q. Remove bogusinfo to reply
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bosch makes a real nice flush trimming saw....
(Amazon.com product link shortened)00815063/sr=1-23/ref=sr_1_23/104-5461938-0912743?v=glance&s=hi
I love the thing, it can boldly go where no saw has gone before. Although i've never tried it on stair nosing, it has been used to cut hundreds of factory interior window sills out to make way for our custom sills. Nice clean even cuts flush to the jamb. I use it for undercutting casing / doorjambs to make way for tile or hardwood floors to. Check it out, it's a eeper! --dave

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They look pretty good. What kind of life do you get out of the blades?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The blades are about $10 and do last a while- I can cut about 40+ windowsills out before replacing it. Although, being a fine thin kerfed blade they are somewhat like a Japanese pull saw in the fact that one nail can really do some damage to the teeth in short order. Get a few extra blades when you find them. They are not the easiest things to find (at least in my area) --dave

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks. The reason I was asking is that one of the local stores sells the blades for $18 and at that price I'd hope they last a while. I always shop local if I can but sometimes the stores get a bit greedy.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
replying to mp, Keith wrote: The cheapest and best way I've found is : either borrow or buy a sawsall with a course blade. Cut in the middle of the riser and angle your saw to the right or left which ever you want to start, and just follow your stair tread to the end, now, when you get to the end bring the handle DOWN slowly and use the tip or end of the blade to finish the cut. Then turn around and do the same on the other end of the nose. Don't make something simple hard. IF you move away from your riser a little you can trim it closer with the sawzall OR use you circular saw to trim it flush.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
replying to mp, Keith wrote: The best way I've found, is borrow or buy a sawzall with a course wood cutting blade, look at the face of the overhang and make a cut toward the riser and angle your cut left or right which ever way your starting untill you come to the riser and follow it to the end or as close as you can get, then lower the handle of your saw and use the tip of the blade to finish the cut. Then turn around and do the same of the other half of the nose. Don't worry yourself if your not completely flush with the riser, you can go back either with you sawzall, circular saw or jigsaw and flush it up, by then you'll be able to see exactly how much to take off to make things flush. I would start at the bottom step so if there is a small mistake it won't be noticeable.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.