What to use to drill hole in steel door?

Page 1 of 2  
What do i use to drill a hole in steel door for the knob? I got a hole saw, but the steel (tin) will destroy the teeth on it. I know the inside of the door is wood, but the outer covering is metal. The only way I can see is to drill about 50 small holes around the needed circle size, but that seems like a pain.
Any suggestions?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Buy a better quality hole saw. A good one will have no trouble going thru that thin metal skin.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Get a bimetal hole saw. Drill half way through, then dill all the way through with a bit the same size as the pilot bit, then drill through with the saw from the other side. I understand they make kits for doing this too. I has a jig that keeps every thing lined up and comes with the hole saw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Use a better hole saw. Good ones will cut metal all day long.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

While cheap hole saws are just that, really cheap, I would think that even they could drill a hole through the "steel" with little problem. Most of them have trouble drilling through the wood. The "steel" of those doors is about as tough as aluminum foil. I agree, with the others however, start by buying a good saw.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 31 Oct 2005 00:48:58 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

I've done it with a cheap hole saw that I threw it away afterwards.
jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 31 Oct 2005 00:48:58 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com

the door doesn't have any existing hole?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I use whole saws for steel studs, you can get allot of wholes out of one bit. I even put eighteen 21/2" wholes in I beams under cooling towers ( lots of lube) You really don't have another choice. Good Milwaukee whole saw they can be sharpened to.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Get a good quality hole saw and you won't have any problem. Morse and Starrett are 2 brands that come to mind.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

I agree with the other posters who said a good hole saw should do it. A while back I had to replace a power window motor in my car, which required drilling a one-inch hole in the inside sheet metal of the door to get at one of the bolts. It was surprisingly fast and easy with the hole saw. -- H
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

Actually it is more like 20-25 holes and a small chisel for between the holes. That's the way I did it for locks in my steel doors. Now I would probably just buy the door hole saw intended for metal and wood doors. Available at Lowes and HD. I bought one just for wood doors recently. I think the one for metal is about $3 more than the one for wood.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 01 Nov 2005 00:14:18 GMT, "George E. Cawthon"

I went and bought the cheapest hole saw I could find and intended to toss it after the job was done. It made the hole easily and is still fairly sharp. I bet I can do many more doors with it. The only problem it was too shallow to penetrate the thickness of the door, but a little chiseling away at the wood allowed the center bit to penetrate the other side of the door and then I used the hole saw on that side.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
replying to anoldfart2, Kay wrote:

I went through my mastercraft bimetal hole saw on my steel door Then a 15$ one from princess auto then the most expensive one I could find 21$ and still all I get it a but of sparks, some smoke, and my paint around the hole is turning brown. I thought I got a good quality hole saw but they aren't working. The center Drill went through like butter but the hole saw seems to be just buffing up the door(lol, jk). I spent about 15 min trying, any other suggestions?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Kay wrote:

Hi, HD or Lowes will have little more expensive better hole saw for like ~30.00 which will do the job. Also use some oil when you drill.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

And you MUST use a low speed drill. Variable speed half inch as slow as you can turn it, under high pressure so you cut instead of skate. Lubricant won't hurt. I like TapMatic cutting fluid. Helps to have the door laying flat so the lube doesnt run away, and so you can really lean into it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 11 Jan 2014 15:39:42 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

When I was in the 7th grade, my uncle came over to install a peephole in the front door, the kind that needs a 2" hole.
He took the door off and put it on the ground. But it was a wooden door. Wouldn't it have been a lot easier to stand on a box or chair if needed and just hold the drill horizontal. My mother or I could have watched to make sure it stayed horizontal
It seemed to me at the time like a lot of exrra work
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
micky wrote:

From the sound of it, he probably had a hunch that the bottom of the door hadn't been dusted in a while. So he was able to "kill 2 birds with one stone'.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Especially strange since my father had died and I was a little boy, 10 when we moved there, and yet my uncle never did anything for my mother or me except have us to dinner 2 or 3 times a year. And that was mostly the effort of his wife and his maid.

Dusted?? Who dusts the bottom of the door? And why take the door off its hinges to do so?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 01/11/2014 11:44 AM, Kay wrote:

You're probably not applying enough pressure to actually cut the metal, but instead running the saw on the metal creating friction, as evidenced by your paint burning up. You need to put your weight into the drill so that the teeth can do their job, and not spin the drill too fast when you do this.
For jobs like this I use a 1/2" chuck drill, because it turns slower than my regular 3/8" chuck drill.
I can't speak to the quality of mastercraft bimetal hole saws, but I do know that Lennox makes a reliable one.
Jon
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jon Danniken wrote:

Hi, Ideally drill press is perfect for the job. I am in luck if I need to do something like that I'd take whole door to my SIL's plant. He owns/operates precision CAD/CAM machine shop. They have all the heavy tools operated by machinists or computer. few mins. job.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.