What to do with 4 Digital Satellite Receivers (forclosed home came with them)

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On Sun, 3 Jan 2010 00:10:28 -0800, Mike Russell wrote:

Your information allows me to conclude the DirecTV dish antenna is too small for FTA TV reception.
I guess the only options left for the DirecTV antennas are: 1. Leave them on the roof or give them back to DirecTV (the default) 2. Turn one or both of the DirecTV dishes into 802.11 WiFi antennas 3. Turn a DirecTV antenna into a TV antenna
The latter two might be of use since my WiFi signal doesn't cover all corners of the house and since there is no cable TV on this side of the mountain.
I see some people take two dish antennas to make a home WiFi extender. http://people.wallawalla.edu/~Rob.Frohne/Airport/Primestar/Primestar.html
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the dishes are no good for fta it requires a minimum of 30 inches for ku band fta, a 36" one will work good on h-h90 motor. The lnbs will do just fine> yes that is the modification to get wifi for your lap top and local ota digital signal for your tv. Engadgit took it from Trevor Marshal About the fta do some reading on this site it seems to be a lot more than just nasa.
http://www.fridgefta.info/forums/index.php
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heres a channel list from that site see if your interested?
http://www.ftalist.co.cc /
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On Sun, 3 Jan 2010 00:16:00 -0800 (PST), joeturn wrote:

I have a question about both of these uses.
1. For the WiFi laptop access, is the point that we could pick up free WiFi access points out of the air? Or is the point that inside our house, we could increase the WiFi signal distance from one end of the house to the other?
2. For Over-the-Air digital TV signals, does the repurposed DirecTV antenna have any advantages over a commercially bought TV antenna?
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On Sun, 3 Jan 2010 00:51:23 -0800, Donna DeLong

#1 - If you are up in the mountains, I doubt you have any wifi signals nearby to pick up. Maybe a neighbor who didn't protect their wireless router, but that is a questionable practice anyway
#2 - Repurposed DirecTV dishes have a distinct DISadvantage for picking up broadcast digital TV signal. They were not designed for the frequencies involved and will not work unless the TV signals are so strong that the coax lead-in picks them up. Buy a real TV antenna and throw the old DirecTV stuff away (unless you subscribe to their service.)
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On Sun, 03 Jan 2010 11:05:53 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@neo.rr.com wrote:

From what you said, the DirecTV antenna is probably useless for TV or WiFi. Someone said the only thing useful was the DirecTV dish coax cable already installed and running throughout the house.
So, I started researching Over-the-Air (OTA) TV reception via antennas.
This FCC site gave me the GPS coordinates of the mounted DirecTV dish: http://www.fcc.gov/mb/engineering/maps/
And this site gave me exact TV coverage maps for a TV antenna: http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wrapper&Itemid
These sites told me which type of TV antenna antenna I need: http://www.antennaweb.org/aw/welcome.aspx http://www.fcc.gov/cgb/consumerfacts/dtvantennas
Putting it all together, the web pages say I need a large directional UHF and Hi-V TV antenna with a pre-amp (violet type) and a remote-controlled motor to aim the chimney-mount (tile roof) antenna about 150 degrees north to south.
Specifically, due to line-of-sight terrain problems, my OTA TV reception realistically is only these 4 channels: 1. PBS UHF Strong (-37dBm, ESE 123 degrees) 2. CBS UHF Strong (-51dBm, N 8 degrees) 3. NBC HiV Medium (-60dBm, N 6 degrees) 4. FOX HiV Medium (-67dBm, SSE 141 degrees) And maybe: 5. ABC HiV Weak (-84dBm, ESE 123 degrees)
I found a lot of TV antenna information at http://www.dennysantennaservice.com/ but I haven't found a good online supplier for what I need.
Any suggestions for an online supplier for TV antennas?
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On Sun, 3 Jan 2010 09:35:10 -0800, Donna DeLong

I know it's not a sexy answer, but I used Amazon to buy my last OTA antenna, the DB2. That model works for me because I'm in a flat terrain suburban area. The DB4 and DB8 are increasingly directional, but provide more gain in the aimed direction. Before that, I used Ebay.
In my experience, antennaweb is slightly pessimistic on what I should expect to receive.
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On Sun, 03 Jan 2010 13:44:52 -0600, Char Jackson wrote:

Interesting. I did notice the FCC reception dBm were different than AntennaWeb (http://www.fcc.gov/mb/engineering/maps ).
AntennaWeb suggested a large directional antenna with a preamp so I'm trying to figure out how to figure the size of the preamp (antennaweb doesn't say).
Is there an online calculator to figure out what preamp power I need?
Given the various received power answerrs from the FCC and TVFool and AntennaWeb URLs, I can summarize my OTA TV signal reception as:
1. PBS UHF Strong (21.1 miles, path 1Edge, Pwr -64 dBm, NM 26.8 dB) 2. CBS UHF Strong (51.4 miles, path LOS, Pwr -51.4 dBm, NM 39.5 dB) 3. NBC HiV Medium (42.1 miles, path 1Edge, Pwr -62.2 dBm, NM 28.7 dB) 4. FOX HiV Medium (-42.1 miles, path 1Edge, Pwr -70.0 dBm, NM 20.9 dB) And maybe: 5. ABC HiV Weak (76.9 miles, path 2Edge, Pwr -105.2 dBm, NM -14.3 dB)
I'm still not sure of some of this stuff yet (eg LOS vs 1Edge, vs 2EDGE or NM power vs dbm power); so my main dilemma now is which amplifier to get.
What is the recommended way to calculate required antenna amplifier power?
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On Sun, 03 Jan 2010 13:44:52 -0600, Char Jackson wrote:

Your suggestion is a good start.
Taking this description of the more powerful $120 DB8-HDTV antenna: http://www.showmecables.com/viewItem.asp?idproductQ87
The two specs that seem relevant appear to be: # High gain across entire UHF band (UHF channels 14-69) # Max Gain 15.8 dB
How do I determine if "15.8 dB is enough for my reception area?
Grom the FCC coverage maps, I receive: 1. PBS UHF (-37dBm, NM 26.8 dB) 2. CBS UHF (-51dBm, NM 39.5 dB) 3. NBC HiV (-60dBm, NM 28.7 dB) 4. FOX HiV (-67dBm, NM 20.9 dB) 5. ABC HiV Weak (-84dBm, NM -14.3 dB)
How do I determine if the DB8 antenna, at 15.8 dB, is enough for me given these dBm and dB reception numbers (and is an amplifier warranted)?
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On Sun, 3 Jan 2010 09:35:10 -0800, Donna DeLong wrote:

CORRECTION: http://www.fcc.gov/cgb/consumerfacts/dtvantennas.html
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On Sun, 03 Jan 2010 11:05:53 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@neo.rr.com wrote:

On Windows, I installed the recommended Network Stumbler v0.4.0 from http://www.netstumbler.com/downloads /
I thought it strange that Netstumble didn't find ANY WiFi access points but then I realized that I don't broadcast my SSID and I guess none of my neighbors do either.
Anyway, it seems like there are no wireless APs in the area and even if there were, it seems logically to me that BOTH sides would have to have the stronger antenna to work, so, I agree, a stronger WiFi isn't the way to go.
I'm going to concentrate on trying to pull down the OTA TV signals by trying to figure out how to calculate which antenna will work in my area.
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On Sun, 3 Jan 2010 12:34:52 -0800, Donna DeLong wrote:

BTW, for whoever suggested Netstumbler, I just found out for Windows, Netstumbler has been deprecated in favor of inSSIDer
http://www.metageek.net/docs/wireless-networking-tools
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Donna you only need to try the engagit modification! Its a fun project and with all your inquisition,I'll bet you'de enjoy prooving to your self that,products for sale wont compare to the enhanced signal you will get from the dish wifi/ DTV mod.
Now after reading your profile I noticed you have picked up several ideas from a broad range of sites from betteter homes to sci fi? The dish mod wont help you increase your in-the-house connection from your router to your laptop unles you had it mounted on your phone/laptop, thats a bit much to ask!
It will however give you a greater signal of digital OTA signal than any store bought array antenna because the collector sends a concentrated signal to a focal point!
It still will depend of LOS if your mountain blocks you now it will block you in that direction from now on soo nothing will help .
Save your money.
Move up on top of the mountain Nibiru is bringing 40 feet of water that will last several months!
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Direct TV dishes are marginally better than the biquad antenna by itself. Pose the question to alt.wireless.internet. You really need a big Primestar dish for wifi. Primestar is defunct, so getting the dish for nothing isn't all that hard, but finding the dishes is something else. I've seen Primestar dishes on abandoned houses, but the thought of spending the night in some podunk jail keeps me from swiping the dish.
Also, that biquad design in Engadget is not good. The feed to the element needs to be coaxial rather than two wires. The loops can be round too, which makes construction easier. This is really OT to sci.geo.satellite-nav. On alt.internet.wireless, you will find the gurus.
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Hog wash!
Satellite navigation has nothing to do with modifing a dish for wifi for ota tv.
You must be trying to discourage the use of DTV dishes for practical means! THE ELEMENT works just fine the way engagit describes.You tell the gurus over at alt.wireles that a circular element will not improve anything but looses db!
The Primestar dish was fiberglass and not as good a collector as a metal DTV dish of a smaller size!
It too is a two wire connection(shield and center tap) and coax is used on the engadget design.
They are either trying to sale you their gimmic or take advantage of Trevor Marshal's expertise.
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Hog wash!
Satellite navigation has nothing to do with modifing a dish for wifi or OTA tv.
For your imformation Digital was lobbied in to make the signal soo weak that you could not pick up TV stations out of town.
This would drive the non-subscribers to buy cable or satellite tv in order to get a good variety,without pixelization.
Notice all emergency,police and weather alerts remained on anolog because of its supperior performance over digital!
You must be trying to discourage the use of DTV dishes for practical means! The ELEMENT works just fine the way engagit describes how to make it.
You tell the gurus over at alt.wireles that a circular element will not improve anything but loss of db gain!
The Primestar dish was fiberglass and not as good a collector as a metal DTV dish of a smaller size!
The build-your-own-bi-quad is a two wire connection(shield and center tap) and coax is used on the engadget design.
Your gurus are either trying to sale you their gimmic or discredit Trevor Marshal's expertise.
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On Sat, 9 Jan 2010 13:58:16 -0800 (PST), joeturn wrote:

[etc etc]
Bad hair day, or did you just get out a big row of axes to grind for the new year?
--
Mike Russell - http://www.curvemeister.com

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my underware is too tight
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On 1/1/2010 15:08, Donna DeLong wrote:

I'd be on the lookout for an E-waste recycling event. With most DBS subscription services the equipment is included, which diminishes the value of old equipment. It may be of some value to hackers to engage in criminal activity.
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Donna DeLong wrote:

Forget about the roof stuff. Anything attached to real property becomes part of the property.
If I were you, I'd carefully remove them - If you do it yourself, you can make sure no further damage is done and removing them will curtail any temptation to further fiddle with them.
To echo what another poster said, don't mount sat dishes on the roof, chimney, etc. (unless necessary to clear an obstacle). better is to mount them on a deck railing or on a post anchored in the ground.
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