What to do about drywall seams cracking ...AGAIN!

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On 1/8/2013 12:01 PM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

tooled expansion joints in concrete.
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On 1/8/2013 12:23 PM, Robert Macy wrote:

one gives this error:
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The requested URL /documents/construction-handbook/chapter1.pdf was not found on this server.
You may want to send an email to them report the broken link.
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Robert Macy wrote:

That is *WAYYYY* too thick! On butt joints at least.
Step #1 is to make sure the joints are securely fastened. If they aren't, the joints will crack. One way to tell is to put your finger lightly on the joint and have someone else thump the wall lightly with their fist a foot or so away. Can you feel movement with your finger? (Note: you can't do your own thumping).
Step #2 is to bed paper tape. Use only enough mud and width to bed and slightly cover the tape.
Step #3 - after #2 is dry - is to sand as needed and apply more mud using a wider knife. You aren't trying to cover the tape with this, you are filling the gap along the edges of the tape created by the taped area being thicker.
Step #4 is to repeat #3 but with a still wider knife. By the time you work up to a 10" knife the tape hump will be pretty much invisible even if it was on butts, not tapered edges.
You mentioned that the cracks were over 3 mils. A human hair is about 3 mils so your cracks don't sound like a disaster. If the sheets are well fastened, rubbing some acrylic caulk into them before painting as Norminn suggested (she's a sharp cookie :) will fix them nicely.
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On Sun, 6 Jan 2013 06:37:00 -0800 (PST), Robert Macy

This indicates that there will likely be a massive Earth Quake in your area very soon. Once the house is destroyed by the quake, the wall cracks will not be noticable. Your best bet is to ignore the cracks while preparing for massive destruction and possibly your death. Now is the time to buy homeowners insurance, life insurance, and prepare your Last Will and Testament, and make funeral arrangements.
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More mud = more cracking. Tape/mud won't keep a wall from moving.
If the wall is moving, pull that sheet off and tie the studs together, which if the studs are wood should have fire blocks installed between them already.
The bed coat for the tape only needs enough mud to paste the tape solidly to the wall; all excess should be removed, the tape should be visible through the mud.
The 2nd (and 3rd) coats should not extend beyond the taper in any direction.
You apply the 2nd coat and knife it level with the taper. The 3rd coat, if necessary, is knifed identically.
Self-sticking fiber tape is often easier for the novice to apply, and perfectly acceptable, the bed coat just goes over instead of under. -----
- gpsman
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I have been in the drywall business for some 30 years so I'll toss out a few suggestions...With a run that long you are probably crossing a structual beam , post or whatever..Which is fine if you run the 12 foot sheets horizontal and make sure the stress point is in the middle of the sheet but I'm guessing the sheets are run vertical or if the sheets were run horizontal there was a floor to ceiling butt joint put there..Either way you're screwed so to speak and not even Durabond is gonna help..Here is what I would do..
Cut the drywall back a few studs on either side of the crack and span the stress point with new drywall..Mud the 2 new butt joints and paint..To much work ??Construct a false beam by screwing 2X4s or whatever you want or have laying around to the wall, sheetrock , add cornerbead and mud...To much work ?? Buy some trim boards and moulding and build a false beam over the spot..Still to much work ?? Buy a 1x4 pine board , nail it to the wall covering the crack and paint it...HTH...
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wrote:

Paint a mural of the Parthenon on the wall. If you don't want to fix it, feature it.
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Thanks for all the good suggestions. The sheets are horizontal. I actually was originally leaning toward putting something that looks like it 'belongs' on the wall at that location, but since had forgotten. Think I got used to the 'clean' look.
What is irritating is is that *IF* the tape were 3, or even 4 inches wide, I think the joint would have remained invisible. The tape simply ripped loose on one side and then transferred the crack to its edge. Where the tape did not come loose [perhaps less tension on it] the surface remained crack free.
Temperature did have a lot to do with the crack formation. the room originally set around 90 degrees [i'm old] but now is isolated and has dropped to around 60 - that's when the cracks showed up with a vengence. But, while I've been working in that room, the temp has gone up to around 70 and some of the cracks have turned 'invisible' again. But, must make certain that they cannot form, else they permanently will show [until re-re-repair] Perhaps if I repair this wall in a COLD room, then when the heat comes back, the tape and mud will take the compression better and no crack will form? when it turns cold again.
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On Sunday, 6 January 2013 09:37:00 UTC-5, Robert Macy wrote:

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