What the heck goes into the trash can (as opposed to recycling?)

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HerHusband wrote on Tue, 03 May 2016 14:55:30 +0000:

I was wondering about that because my septic system is about 100 feet or so away and down a hill so I guess it's 20 feet below the house.
I don't even know where the cleanouts are. I haven't touched it since I moved in 10 years ago, and, well, who knows how long it was in use before that.
So, how do they "inspect" it anyway? I presume I have to find the cleanout and then open it, and then what?
Do you just look?
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Arthur,

I have to dig down and expose the access cover of the septic tank. I think the inspector will dig it up, but I know exactly where it is located. Thankfully, the top of my septic tank is only 6" below the ground.
They open the cover and use a pole with a board on it to take measurements. They measure the sludge build up at the bottom of the tank, and the scum layer floating on top. They also do a quick visual inspection of the drain field, to make sure it's not a smelly swamp or something. Takes them less than 10 minutes, then they charge me $125.
If the scum or sludge layers build up too close to the inlet pipe, they are required to pump the tank. Naturally, the cost goes way up if they have to pump.
When the county first started the inspection program here, they just routinely pumped the tanks every few years.
Then they switched to actually measuring the contents and only pumping when needed. Initially, they allowed homeowners to take the measurements, but I don't know if they allow that anymore.
We're actually due for our septic inspection next month.
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
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Steve Stone wrote on Tue, 03 May 2016 07:28:41 -0400:

I always wondered about that.
I am in hill country so the septic system is down hill by a lot. I don't know how far, but I see a white pipe sticking up which is about 100 feet from the house.
I don't know where the cleanout is even and I've lived here a decade.
I guess I'm not doing something that I should be doing, but how would I even know that my septic system would need to be pumped out if I don't even know where it is completely or where the drain is?
I realize that if it stunk and weeped I'd know that, but I think, given it's on a steep slope, the chance of that happening seems slim.
How would I even test that my septic is getting close to being filled?
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On Mon, 02 May 2016 21:09:16 +0000, Arthur Cresswell wrote:

My recycling program says these are the acceptable items for recycling: http://www.recologysiliconvalley.com/residentialUnincorporatedSantaClaraRecycling.htm
Highlights: Please empty and rinse all food and beverage containers. Batteries Standard household batteries Place in a clear, sealed plastic bag and set on top of the recycling cart. Glass All glass food, beverage jars and bottles. Remove lids and place separately in bin. Fruit juice Mayonnaise jars Spaghetti sauce jars Metal All metal food and beverage containers. Aluminum cans Tin/steel food and beverage cans Plastic All rigid containers marked #1 - #7 Milk and juice jugs Shampoo, detergent, and other household bottles Soft drink and water bottles Yogurt, margarine, and other food containers Paper Put mixed paper in the toter labeled: Mixed / Office Paper. Adhesive notes Brown paper grocery bags Cardboard (Break down boxes and bundle larger pieces securely using twine and place next to container) Envelopes (Including plastic window types) Food boxes (cereal, crackers, frozen food - Remove plastic liners) Junk mail Magazines & catalogs Newspaper Paper (colored, computer, white) Paper bags Paper egg cartons, paper towel rolls Phone books Wrapping Paper Used motor oil may be set out in one-gallon plastic containers with tight fitting, screw top lids only. You may place up to two one-gallon containers next to your recycling cart for pickup and empty recycled one-gallon containers will be left in their place. Place fully drained motor oil filters in a sealed, leak-proof, plastic bag and place next to your recycle cart.
Unacceptable Recycling Materials Construction Debris Concrete, rocks, dirt Electronic / Universal Waste Televisions, computers, cell phones, batteries, fluorescent light bulbs, mercury switches Household Hazardous Waste Paints, solvents, cooking oil, motor oil, cleaners, corrosives, fuel tanks - propane tanks, syringes
This is what it says goes in the garbage can: http://www.recologysiliconvalley.com/residentialUnincorporatedSantaClaraGarbage.htm
Glass Auto, mirror and tinted glass Glassware, crystal and dinnerware Household window glass Light bulbs (except fluorescent bulbs) Metal Clothes hangers Foil Pots and pans Scrap metal Wire rope Organic Material Animal feces or manure Food scraps Paper Milk cartons and other waxed paper Paper towels, napkins and facial tissues Soiled papers, food wrappings, napkins, tissues or towels Plastic Bubble wrap PVC or other plastic piping Shrink wrap and plastic bags and liners Styrofoam/polystyrene containers and packing peanuts Toys, trays, cups, garden hoses, flower pots Unmarked plastics
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On 5/2/16 5:09 PM, Arthur Cresswell wrote:

So BFD. Other than PC libbies, tree huggers, and the save-the-whales crowd- who gives a rat's ass?
--
Political correctness is a doctrine...fostered by an illogical minority
and widely promoted by the left and the mainstream media...that
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