What the heck goes into the trash can (as opposed to recycling?)

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Hi Anthony,
On 5/5/2016 7:25 AM, HerHusband wrote:

SWMBO is *really* obsessive about tracking expenses. She logs all of them in a database she built so she knows what each credit card bill will be before it arrives. At least once a month, I'll get grilled over some "missing receipt": "Do you think you spent $37.23 at Home Depot on the 15th?"
This, of course, is code for: "What the hell did you buy for $37.23 at Home Depot and why didn't you give me the receipt??!"

We only use the one as a "backup" in our bug-out-bag (for our most recent financial data). Whatever you use for that purpose has to be easily updated, accessible from a variety of other computers and reasonably durable (as you won't be "babying it" if you need to "bug out")

I save small ones (512-8G) for bootable media. I.e., I have clonezilla on one (512MB being *roughly* the size of a CD-ROM so any "live CD" is a potential candidate to move onto a small thumb drive). I also have little "utility CD's" (that are, in fact "utility thumb drives") for things like resetting Windows passwords, etc. I have OPHCRACK installed on some of the larger ones (with the "enlarged" rainbow tables).
None of these are uses that would justify *buying* a thumb drive; a CD/DVD is more economical. But, the thumb drives are more resilient than optical media and, "no longer of use, anyway..."

I typically use my camera to document some *thing*. Then, quickly pull those images off the camera (memory card). So, any card that I use is usually blank -- and more than capable of holding the next batch of photos "documenting something".
SWMBO is more the typical photographer -- taking countless photos until the card fills; then, spending hours trying to sort the photos as she moves them onto her photo archive.
(the idea of yet another "organizing chore" is enough to turn me off to that! Hard enough keeping my desk, bookshelves, desktop, etc. organized without adding to the list)

Music is "unfortunate". I could live with the original CD's -- but they are a hassle to access (and must be played on a CD drive). Hence, the appeal of the disc storage and the effort to rip them. But, I also need them in a different/special format for my "network speakers" as decoding MP3's each time you want to listen to something is a silly waste of resources (time/memory). And, would also require *encoding* all audio into that format in order to have the speakers capable of reproducing the audio (e.g., VoIP, movie "simulcasts", front door intercom, etc.).

Yes. I was mentioning it as I have used many different media types over the years (including 9T tape; having a spare transport was a HUGE space consideration! :> ). It's not enough for me to have *a* way of accessing the media but also need a BACKUP way as well! (e.g., my MO drives)

SWMBO is not fond of beef (understatement). So, any that comes into the house is intended for my own consumption. E.g., 6 lbs of ground beef yesterday will go into the batch of sauce I'm making this afternoon (with some made into burger patties to be frozen).
I'm excited in that I've managed to add beef w/broccoli to our weekly menu. And, I make a big enough batch that I get an extra meal out of it! (on the agenda for tonight)
OTOH, I will counter with something like braised asparagus and linguine agli e olio (not fond of pasta w/o red sauce!) -- on the agenda for TOMORROW night (maybe *I* can eat a hamburg?? :> )

I've never been a lark. When I was younger, I was involved in a research project that tried to monitor biological rhythms (in this case, circadian rhythms). For months (and eventually, years), I carried a doctor's sachel around with sphygmomanometer (blood pressure), peak expiratory flow meter (lung capacity), dynamometer (hand strength), thermometer (body temperature), etc. I would sit down periodically and run through a battery of tests on myself: the above plus things like how quickly I could add (and record) 100 pairs of single digit numbers, digital dexterity, etc.
In my initial exposure, this went on for several months before the data was "processed" -- trying to fit a curve to the data. From the *data*, the result came back suggesting my *body* was operating at its best in the evening -- specifically, around 6P. Despite the fact that it was being forced onto the normal schedule of a child. This coincided with what I knew personally to be true of my own physiology.
Of course, its possible that this has changed over the decades. But, I still "feel" like I am more productive later in the day. E.g., I won't be hungry for many hours after rising. And, left to my own devices, end up inverting my sleep-wake cycle (e.g., to bed at 6:30 this morning, up at 10:00 -- did I mention lack of sleep? :> )

Don't let your knuckles drag on the ground!! :)

I guess I've been relatively lucky. My arms will get tired from too much lifting. But, I can't recall ever having a sore back -- despite all the digging I've done over the years.

Yeah, I keep wondering who that old man is that I keep meeting in the bathroom! He never gives me any PRIVACY...
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On Thursday, May 5, 2016 at 2:34:57 PM UTC-4, Don Y wrote:

She needs a job. I'm far too busy to spend time on stuff like that. Forty hours a week at work, then weekends helping with home maintenance and improvement leaves me little time for bothering my husband about such things.
Of course, I generally use or see him using whatever the $37.23 bought at Home Depot.
Cindy Hamilton
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On 5/5/2016 11:47 AM, Cindy Hamilton wrote:

She tracked construction expenses for a large business in her day job. So, keeping track of where money goes is natural to her.

In our case, it pays off. We *know* where we spend our money. It's not a mystery like it is to most folks ("Gee, I just don't know where the money goes...!")
It's also handy to be able to know how prices are changing: "I don't recall paying this much for roof paint LAST year..." "We didn't. Last year that same bucket cost us just $X!"
We purchased something yesterday. "Oh, the price has gone up! It was two dollars less, last time!" "Yeah, but that was a year ago!" "So, 10% in a year?" (oops! wanna bet anyone else buying the same product was clueless as to the 10% price increase?)

I don't see it as "bothering". She's providing a useful service -- one that I'd not be eager to take on. The insights from her record keeping often lead us to changing vendors for products/services -- because we KNOW what's been happening to prices (instead of just relying on hunches).
Do you KNOW what it costs you to operate your vehicles? Home upkeep? Feed your family? Maintain your health?
Or, do you just "have a feel" for those costs?

Would you know that *it* was the $37.23 purchase? And, not the $10 purchase? Should you *have* to be involved in all of his activities in order to vouch for same?
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On Thursday, May 5, 2016 at 3:07:59 PM UTC-4, Don Y wrote:

Not a damned clue. Less than our disposable income, certainly.
Especially "maintain your health". My husband has multiple prescriptions and frequent doctor visits. All of that is entirely his affair, and I don't even look at the bills, even though they're paid out of our joint account.
Shoot, I don't even keep a check register. I look at the monthly statement online, to see if anything looks suspicious. I assume their computer can do the arithmetic. It's what they're good at.

I don't *have* to be involved; I want to be involved. If I didn't see the $37.23 thingy in use, I'd never even think about the $37.23.
Multiple charges at Home Depot are how we know it's spring. ;)
Cindy Hamilton
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On 5/5/2016 1:07 PM, Cindy Hamilton wrote:

Does he know when the prices of his meds are changing? Or, simply pay whatever the pharmacist tells him is "due"? How does he know when to start shopping for another pharmacy? Or, when to bring up alternative treatments with his MD?
Part of knowing is having data that you can consult. I no longer want to bother trying to REMEMBER what I paid for some item last week -- or last month/year.

Computers are best at *remembering*! Save me the hassle of adding up a column of 4 or 5 digit numbers, once a month? Pfah. Save me the trouble of REMEMBERING those numbers and you've earned your keep!
As I run a business, I am keen on where the money goes -- and being able to document that to the tax man, clients, etc. "Gee, I forgot to bill that client for these supplies that I purchased on his behalf. <frown> I guess I'll just have to treat them as a *gift* for said client as the contract is now closed <double frown>"

We are very concerned with where our monies go. We never "buy on time" (finance), carry balances, etc. Because we KNOW that we will have what we need available when we need it.
"How will you be paying for this (car, washing machine, 2000 sq ft of tile, 20 tons of stone, medical bill, etc)?"
"Cash. (or check/charge -- same difference)"
We don't get surprised when a bank or credit card statement shows up weeks later. And, don't prematurely reinvest monies that we'll be needing for a big ticket purchase next month, etc.

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On Thursday, May 5, 2016 at 4:45:07 PM UTC-4, Don Y wrote:

He pays a small co-pay. The rest is paid by our insurance.
He recently went to a different pharmacy, not because of lower prices, but because Walgreens were stupid and jerked him around.

What I paid in the past is largely irrelevant. I'm not going to do without (for example) coffee because the price has gone up.

I don't run a business. We're both salaried, so our paychecks never vary.

Either do we, except we've got a year and a half left on our 15-year mortgage.

Either do we. We don't undertake to spend money that we do not have.
Charles Dickens put it best:
"Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen pounds nineteen and six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds nought and six, result misery."
Cindy Hamilton
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On 5/6/2016 11:45 AM, Cindy Hamilton wrote:

Be thankful everything appears to be "a small copay". I have friends who shell out hundreds of dollars per month, "out of pocket", despite insurance. They are clearly concerned when the price goes up as THEY bear the cost of that.

We aren't hostage to any of our purchases. One of the chocolates that SWMBO regularly consumed increased 50% in the past year. She switched to alternatives that were more affordable and just as tastey.
The same was true of the (canned) chili she was eating; we found another supplier (of the exact same product!) at a lower cost.
Instead of just wondering why we're (apparently) "spending more", we know what is driving those increases -- and take action to control them.
It's not what you MAKE but, rather, what you SPEND!

Income is only one side of the equation. Do you know where your money is *going*? Or, do you just feel pleased when your bank balance is ever increasing (regardless of whether or not it is increasing as fast as it COULD?)

We don't buy on time. INCLUDING the house, the car, etc. A large part of how we can do that is by knowing where our money is going. And, doing for ourselves.
It costs $75 to have a tree (5G) planted, here. Not counting the cost of the tree! I've planted 10 in the past few years. And that doesn't count the 60+ other shrubs, etc.
The neighbor had a trivial one-zone irrigation system installed for his small garden -- for $1200. I've buried 1500 ft of 1/2" line -- for the cost of the pipe (and the 19 valves to control it).
I've got dirty fingernails; neighbor "lost" his house.

It's not just having the money but, also, having the money accessible. We could run out tomorrow and buy ANOTHER (second) home. But, would take a big hit getting AT the money to do so!
So, we plan when we will need which amounts so the money is "available". If we *both* ASSUME there's liquid assets for some particular purchase without coordinating those, then we'll probably both be annoyed when we have to scurry to free up those funds WHEN THE STATEMENT ARRIVES (if we didn't TRACK the expenses as we incurred them).

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On Friday, May 6, 2016 at 4:09:29 PM UTC-4, Don Y wrote:

I do feel pleased about the ever-increasing bank balance.
Of course it could increase faster. We could shut off the hot tub and not have the outrageous electric bills. We could cancel our cable service.
We're not going to do any of that, and no amount of data entry would change what we're doing. We buy what we want, when we want it, and we have enough money to cover our purchases and save for the future. Happily, "what we want" isn't very much or very big.
Your net worth is almost certainly higher than mine. I'm very happy for you.

If we didn't have a mortgage, we'd still be paying rent.

Sadly, my husband's joints are breaking down, so we're going to have to start hiring some things done for us. Up until now, we've pretty much done everything ourselves, too. Someplace we've got a picture of me pushing a wheelbarrow of concrete around.
Cindy Hamilton
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On 5/6/2016 1:44 PM, Cindy Hamilton wrote:

We don't have cable (more interesting things to do than watch TV).
OTOH, we spend a fair amount on electricity for my various computers (there are 5 running, as I type this). And, a sh*tload on water/sewer to keep the citrus growing.
But, we don't eat out, drink, take vacations, etc. How you spend your money is YOUR choice -- and your problem/responsibility. We like knowing how ours is spent so we can reevaluate the choices that we've (often silently!) made -- instead of just repeating "learned behavior".

It has nothing to do with "net worth". We have friends who live in million dollar homes, have maids, landscapers, pool boys, are always traveling, etc. Cell phones with pricey data plans ("Oooh! Somebody texted me!"). Fancy clothes (I wear jeans and a t-shirt every day -- and *shoes* when we go out!). Coiffed hair/nails.
We elect to have none of those things as they aren't in line with our priorities.
We like being able to do what we want, when we want, without having to worry about living beyond our means -- and have some confidence in the QUALITY of all those things.
Of course, much of that means we have to do a lot for ourselves.
We've neighbors who would never think of dirtying their hands under the hood of a car -- who DELIGHT in the "service" their dealership provides ("And they give us a FREE loaner!" Do you REALLY think that loaner is "free"? :> ). OTOH, their vehicles are always in the shop; ours, never.
I spend a few hours every week baking -- to offset the cost/inconvenience of finding suitable baked goods. And, lately, a few hours "making chocolates" for similar reasons (I'm sure if "money were no object" we could locate similar items -- and pay to have them shipped here).
I spend a day each month/6 wks babysitting a large pot of tomato sauce -- instead of buying "bottled". We prepare our own meals every day -- instead of paying someone else to do the same (taking just as much TIME).
There's no free lunch; you "pay" in some way or another. We just find ways to pay that give us more control over our lives and less reliance on others.

I suspect you will find the difference to be alarming! Not just in terms of cost but, also, in terms of the quality of work.
"If you want it done RIGHT..."
I've been aggressively trying to get ahead of things that WILL present problems in the future. E.g., I felled all the tall trees on the property so I don't have to worry about hiring someone to do that later. And, no need to rake leaves. I'll paint the house exterior, soon -- knowing that the NEXT time I'll probably have to hire someone (but push that out 15-20 years hence). SWMBO's new car will probably be the last car she *drives* (assuming she gets 15+ years out of it -- 70K miles). I'll replace the roof in a few years (still researching that) and that should be the last time THAT will need to be done.
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On 5/6/2016 2:44 PM, Cindy Hamilton wrote:

Check out:
David Perlmutter's book "Grain Brain"
amazon.com/Grain-Brain-Surprising-Sugar--Your-Killers/dp/031623480X
and
William Davis' book "Wheat Belly"
amazon.com/Wheat-Belly-Lose-Weight-Health/dp/1609614798
and
Gary Taubes book "Why We Get Fat and What To Do About It"
amazon.com/Why-We-Get-Fat-About/dp/0307474259
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On 5/5/2016 2:47 PM, Cindy Hamilton wrote:

I find it is easier to use cash under $100 and not have to check charges on a CC or bank statement. I used to use my debit card a lot and have to go through the statement to be sure it balances. Far shorter now.
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On 5/5/2016 12:11 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

When I was younger, I paid cash for everything -- even my tuition at school! But, I operated on a simpler money management scheme: "If I don't have the cash WITH me, IN MY POCKET, RIGHT NOW, then I don't *need* whatever it is!"
And, as my "needs" are modest (even moreso, now), it was relatively easy to decide that I'd have to go home to eat instead of picking up some fast food, etc. Most days I leave the house with a few singles in my wallet. The things that I am likely to NEED (that can't be deferred) are *gasoline*. I don't NEED a can of soda, a greasy burger, a new pair of shoes, etc. (If I WANT any of those things, then I'll plan for them!)
That's different when you're sharing accounts with another and have more monies tied up in investments than liquid assets (which is far more common than when younger). It's annoying to have to transfer ADDITIONAL funds simply because you failed to SHARE the fact taht you were planning on spending $500 for a CLASS this Spring while your counterpart was planning on spending a similar amount on SUPPLIES. I.e., if we're going to need $1000 for "extraordinary expenses", then lets arrange to have that $1000 available instead of just the $500 you (or I) planned on.
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On 5/5/2016 4:55 PM, Don Y wrote:

Not a problem for us, my wife carries no more that $20 on her and does not go anyplace on her own any more. She has me take her where she wants to go and has me pay for it. Easy to track expenses and she has no stress from it. Works for us.
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On 5/5/2016 6:15 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Our daily activities are largely independent. We each "do our own thing" and meet back here later in the day. Sometimes, joint appearances are necessary (usually at some function/fundraiser that SWMBO is interested in).
She doesn't concern herself with my projects, home maintenance, the cars, etc. and I don't worry about what she's spending on her "hobbies" or lunch dates with her friends, etc. She's more likely to grill me about whether I have *any* money in my wallet -- esp if she knows I'm headed someplace where I will likely *need* it!
(some places that I frequent will only accept cash; others will NOT accept cash and insist on checks; still others will take anything)
So, we long ago learned to clue each other in on upcoming expenditures (beyond the piddling expenses). E.g., I'll soon be painting the roof so she should expect me to be shelling out a lot of money for paint. And, I want to put some siding on the back porch so that will be a kilobuck or so...
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On Thursday, May 5, 2016 at 9:25:50 PM UTC-4, Don Y wrote:

Actually, I've been wondering about that. What sort of roof do you have that requires painting?
(Bringing us back around to home repair.)
Cindy Hamilton
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On 5/6/2016 11:47 AM, Cindy Hamilton wrote:

Homes here are either pitched roofs or flat roofs.
Pitched are either ceramic tile, asphalt tile, "metal/tin", built up or torch-sealed felt.
Flat are either "built up" (gravel over felt), bitumen (felt), rubber membrane or a fiberglass membrane.
To increase heat reflectance, you typically paint the roof (white or aluminum). Most folks (incl roofers) think the paint is actually *sealing* the roof. And, use that to pitch more expensive paints (higher concentration of solids). Of course, if you're relying on paint to keep your roof water tight, you've got some serious problems! :>
As the paint is exposed to the sun (UV + heat) and scouring effects of windblown dust, it tends to degrade in 5-7 years, despite how thick it is (coverage is 60-100 sq ft per gallon).
The more significant "home maintenance" aspect is NOT the painting but, rather, getting up there and having a look at the roof regularly. As it is flat, things tend to accumulate/sit up there (e.g., pine needles). They, in turn, trap moisture. Which eventually "rots" the paint.
[I probably pull 30 pounds of pine needles off the roof every couple of months -- and *we* don't have any pine trees in the yard!]
Also, as the roofing must roll *up* the sides of the house (think of the roof as having a wall around it), there is potential for the house to "move" and open cracks/tears in the edges which would allow water to seep into the structure (inside the walls).
Instead of tackling the roof every 5-7 years, I try to paint 1/5th of it every year. This gives me the opportunity to remove debris piled up there and inspect/patch. There are lots of things (intentionally) poking through the roof (vents, sewer stacks, water/electric services, etc.) and each is a place that can easily develop a small leak.
But, it also limits the effort required to clean the roof (TSP) in preparation for painting -- as I'm only tackling 1/5th of the roof at a time.
Most other homes in the neighborhood have replaced their roofs. Our vigilance has allowed this roof to remain intact for ~25 years, already.
Painting can easily approach 1000-1500 (depending on who you hire and how thorough they are; seldom do they invest much time patching -- just slather paint on anything that *looks* like it may be a problem). A new roof is easily upwards of $5000 for a simple "felt" roof.
OTOH, DIY and you're talking closer to $120/year.
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On Friday, May 6, 2016 at 3:53:12 PM UTC-4, Don Y wrote:

Thanks. That was interesting. I live in the snowy country where flat roofs are not very popular, and solar loading is not extreme. The vast majority of houses here are asphalt shingle, and I've noticed a trend toward lighter colors. A few years ago we replaced brown shingles with... mostly greyish-beige, I guess you could call it. It's a very common color here.
Cindy Hamilton
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On 5/6/2016 1:03 PM, Cindy Hamilton wrote:

Yes. Here, even pitched roofs are very shallow. No "snow load" to accommodate so the pitch is more a stylistic issue. (of course, some roofing materials *require* pitch)

The relentless sun cooks the asphalt shingles, here. And, any load *on* them (e.g., walking!) damages them in short order (they become very soft and easy to tear as your feet shuffle across them).
Ceramic tile is, in theory, indestructible. But for the roof beneath! And, as you can't easily INSPECT the roof beneath, you don't know you have a problem until you see water stains on the ceiling.
With our roof, I have to be aware of outdoor temperatures/exposure and how "pliable" the roof is likely to be. E.g., walking on it on the coldest winter nights (which I often do to watch meteor showers) leaves it prone to "cracking" -- lack of snow load concerns means the roofs tend to be flimsy... it doesn't take much structure to hold up a layer of PAINT!
Many homes have kit on the roofs (furnaces, heat pumps, air conditioner compressors, swamp coolers, etc.) that need service from time to time. So, you're vulnerable to the actions of any "maintenance personnel" (who are more interested in fixing the kit than in worrying about any wear and tear they are putting on your roof!)
The biggest risk, however, is from the glare that comes off the roof. As the sun is always bright and the roof is painted white, you can easily go "snow blind"! In one of my first efforts on the roof, I came down to fetch something out of the garage. I had so quickly moved from the bright light of sun-on-white into the RELATIVE darkness of the garage that I was completely unprepared for the ensuing BLINDNESS! "Cripes! I can't SEE!!!"

Pitched roofs have to be concerned with appearances more than flat -- you'd be hard pressed to tell what color our roof is painted cuz it *is* flat (you'd need to be above it to get a view of it).
If I could replace the roof entirely, I'd opt for a metal/tin roof as it should require *no* maintenance (though might be LOUD during the rainy season). Unfortunately, it requires more pitch than we have available, here, so not an option.
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Don,

I try to migrate my old data to new technology just for that reason. I no longer need my old floppy drives, zip drives, SCSI tape drives, VHS players, Cassette players, DV camcorder, Super8 movie camera, or instamatic cameras. The data, photos, video, and music have all been moved to modern devices.
If some new storage medium becomes popular in the future, I'll migrate my data to that and get rid of my ancient blu-rays and USB drives.
The data is what's important, not the devices its stored on.

Nope, my back bends the other way, so I look like I'm doing a back bend while I walk. Head and butt to the back, big stomach hanging out the front. :)
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
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Hi Anthony,
On 5/5/2016 9:07 PM, HerHusband wrote:

The operative word there is "try" :> For me to do that (and to have DONE that) consistently, I'd probably spend all of my time "moving data" around.
When I started, moving files electronically (e.g., "on line") wasn't practical; you'd have to push a file over a phone line to some server someplace, then have the other party pull it from that server (or, one of you would have to MAINTAIN that server). At 19.2K -- even 50Kb/s -- that's just not practical for most things. Especially if you're in different time zones (long distance charges).
[And, having to deal with a client who has their modem misconfigured so the file arrives corrupted, etc.]
So, files typically got moved through the mail (overnight). And, on a medium that the client could support. As my tastes in equipment tended to be "upper shelf", I could either coerce clients into making those purchases "to be compatible with me" -- or, buy some schlock device that one of their guys convinced them to purchase so that *I* could be compatible with *them*!
[Of course, this also meant using some bizarro piece of software that they'd selected -- or, that came with the device. So, not only did I have to support the hardware of their choice to transfer data, but, also, the software AND OS needed to put the data on/off that device!]
Of course, having "coerced" me into buying the one device, they then lost any influence on my chasing their future device experiments: "Hey, we already settled on THIS device and THAT software; lets not go changing things just because you've decided to try something new!"
But, that meant that I was now saddled with that device for the duration of that project.
When the project is complete, what do I do? Invest the time to move all of the data onto some better technology that I use? Then, have to worry about moving it *back* to that original medium if they need some followup work? (keep in mind, I support projects "indefinitely")
Easier to just archive the equipment, software, OS, etc. WITH the project!
And, hope that they "mature" before they want to start another project!
[I've got all sorts of bizarre tape media (DDS2, DDS3, DDS4, DLT, DLT III, DLT IV, SDLT, Ultrium, Ultrium2, DAT72, 8mm, 9T, etc.); an assortment of different "cartridge disks" (ZIP, ORB, 3" MO, 5" MO, MD, Syquest dogs, etc.); floppies (3", 5", 8"); CD's & DVD's; PCMCIA/CF/SD/MMC/ cards (and their smaller variants); along with "drives" to access each of them -- actually, I recycled my last 9T so those are now orphans]
Even migrating from hard disks to BIGGER hard disks takes a fair bit of time!
In the past, I would (human nature) try to impose some order on the data. So, try to put projects on the same medium. Or, in a common directory. Then, sorted by client, etc. So, it was never a case of simply bulk copying from one medium to a DENSER medium.
[Consider how long it takes to rip hundreds of CD's -- and, unless you've got a big "changer", you're pretty much tethered to the "process" for the duration! For a REAL chore, consider how long it takes to scan 35mm slides!! :< Or, *paper* records! Even with an ADF, you st there on pins and needles wondering if a sheet will scan "crooked" (and need to be reprocessed)]
And, its not the sort of task that you can easily/reliably farm out: "OK, I need you to take this 3480 tape cartridge and use Tommy's Super Terrific Tape Backup Program, running on a DOS 3.3 machine with this *particular* SCSI HBA (because ASPI didn't exist at that time) and copy the data into a portion of the file system from which you can later transfer it onto this new fangled DLT drive -- that isn't supported under DOS 3.3! So, you'll have to figure out how to transfer those files onto another machine that has a more modern SCSI HBA and suitable software to talk to the newer drive. And, I need some reassurance that you will do this CORRECTLY lest I LOSE this data in the process!"
Being able to electronically transfer files was a HUGE improvement for me! I only had to deal with "media" for "final deliverables".
And, my new approach to "archive organization" frees me from the natural tendency to want to organize things, hierarchically; I can just put things anywhere and let the database tell me where they are located! And, with a simple query, I can tell which files have NO "backups" and take steps to replicate them elsewhere!

I've not even tried to scan my old photos. A week scanning ~50 year old 35mm slides was grueling enough! ("Hmm... this slide is BACKWARDS! Uncle Fred was LEFT handed!!")
I have probably 100 LPs "new" that I've carefully preserved that are awaiting a few weeks of my time to transfer to digital media. The same is true of my cassette library.
SWMBO often buys "lesson tapes" that aren't available on DVD. So, I keep a VCR to copy those onto digital media. Of course, that also requires sitting down and manually sorting out where to insert chapter markers (cuz tapes don't have that concept!). And, of course, a nice, useful set of menus to make it easier for her to find what she wants.
My technical library (dead tree edition) is simply impractical to digitize. From time to time, I'll spend a day searching for electronic copies of titles that would let me trim them from my bookshelves. But, often the expense of re-buying the title is simply not worth the space I'll recover!
So, it becomes easier to just support the media that's already in place rather than chasing the latest technology in the hope that it "saves" something, in the end.
A friend has commented that data NEVER gets discarded. So, you have to assume it will always grow -- to consume all of the (storage) space available for it!
[Aside from client data, I really have no idea what I would WANT to discard! And, even among the client data, there are probably many things I'd like to retain just for reference: "How did I solve that similar problem for XYZ, Inc?"]

No, the *time* is important! The data may NEVER be needed! :-( That's the calculus I have to make each time I try to migrate some old data onto new media; how much time am I willing to put into this on the CHANCE that I'll need it in the future?
Historically, I rarely have to go back to client projects after delivery. I'm not the sort that gets drawn into endless "versions" of a product. So, unless I made a mistake/bug somewhere -- OR, the client "loses" the delivered copy -- I can usually just leave the project on a copy of the delivered media, indefinitely.
I have, however, taken to chasing down PDF copies of data sheets and databooks that I used for projects, burning these onto a CD and removing the dead tree versions of those documents from my files. This often lets me shrink a 6" thick folder down to 2" without any loss of information!

Hmmm... I can see that would make any sort of labor requiring bending (forwards) tedious!
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