What the heck goes into the trash can (as opposed to recycling?)

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Safety Kleen in Breslau Ontario re-refines used oil, producing "new" engine oil.
Burning PCBs is only possible at very high temperatures - like the temperatures Lime kilns burn at.
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Not too much dissolved in it, but lots of crud suspended. Lots of folks burn waste motor oil, but most of them filter it first.
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On 5/3/2016 8:32 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

Candidly, if I have a quart of used oil, say from changing in lawn mower, it goes into the trash. To get it to a recycle center or someone that would take it would require an equivalent amount of gasoline for the round trip.
My mother did not raise me to be a garbage man and I'm not going to store trash so I have enough to take to recycle.
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On Tuesday, May 3, 2016 at 9:09:14 AM UTC-4, Frank wrote:

IDK how it works where you are, but here in NJ many auto parts stores accept used motor oil. I have a 5 gallon pail and when it's full take it over when I'm going to be in the area. No need for a special trip.
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On 5/3/2016 9:45 AM, trader_4 wrote:

Basically same here but I no longer change oil in cars and lawn mower is only once a year then maybe several years for snow thrower and generator all of which require a quart or less. Rather than clutter garage with container of oil, it gets trashed.
I recall when trash company delivered extra container for recycle asking guy, "Where the fuck can I keep my cars with these two large containers taking up garage space?"
If state had done it right, all this would not have been required. Ferrous metals are easily removed from garbage for recycling at dump by use of a magnet. Local dump was into recycling but needed extra funds to do it but stopped when they could not get it. State forced recycling with extra taxes but workers at dump still have to sort recycle. If they had just funded recycle and let dump do all then homeowners would not be involved and containers and extra recycling trucks would not have been needed.
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On 5/3/2016 6:08 AM, Frank wrote:

No motorized devices here -- other than cars. I arrange to change the oil just before the first weekend of a month and pour the waste oil into the container from which the new oil came. Then, drop it off at the local hazardous waste facility with any batteries (from UPS's) that have died in the past month.
As our municipal water is all well sourced, I'm not keen on stuff finding its way into the aquifer (for my generation -- or the ones 100 years hence)

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On 5/3/2016 9:08 AM, Frank wrote:

So, take it some day when you go to buy auto parts. Better than sending toxic wastes to the landfill. That leaches into the water and makes people sick.
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On Mon, 2 May 2016 17:08:01 -0500, RonNNN wrote:

Pound for pound, it probably costs your municipality more at the water treatment plant than it would at a landfill.
Also, you may put more fat and oil into the drain than it can handle. (I.e. the soap that normally ends up going down the pipe.)
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@bell.net says...

Maybe so, but I've found in the past that since our garbage only gets picked up once a week, putting food in the trash invites maggots and roaches and stuff. I'm happy to let my taxes and garbage fees work at the water treatment plant rather than the landfill.
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On Mon, 2 May 2016 18:32:36 -0500, RonNNN wrote:

Is there a problem with the lid on your gargabe container?

Some might say that you are using the taxes of others to subsidise your disproportionate use of the operational capacity of the water treatment plant.
In practice, it is more complicated, because in some places, the sewage plant captures the methane produced, and are actually designed with garbage disposals in mind. Also, less fuel is consumed carrying the waste to the dump. If your community incinerates garbage it will incur an extra environmental cost as well.
A lot depends on how expensive water is in your community, and how much soap and hot water you use to prevent grease build-up.
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@bell.net says...

All of the soap and water and electricity I use to heat the water and run the garbage disposal (et al )I pay for. I also pay to have my garbage and recyclables picked up and pay a storm water runoff fee. If that's what you call using other peoples taxes we'll just have to agree to disagree. And if you think a garbage can lid will keep out roaches and maggots we'll have to agree to disagree again.
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RonNNN wrote on Mon, 02 May 2016 19:32:00 -0500:

I'm curious what you pay.
We pay 33 dollars a month for the once-weekly trash pickup (which includes two bins of blue, two bins of green and one bin of brown).
We pay 13 cents to 50 cents a kilowatt hour to pump water (depends on the monthly amounts) and we don't pay sewage since we have septic.
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says...

I don't have a bill handy to break it all down but the total usually runs between $65 & $70 per month. Just a few years ago it only ran about $30 per month. Before I retired I had a 6yd dumpster at my shop, and no trash was ever picked up from home, just the recycled stuff. So, in that sense I've paid it forward for many years!
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We have garbage picked up every week, and recycling is picked up every two weeks. Our bill averages around $20 a month (paid every two months).
We could probably switch to bi-weekly garbage pick up, but I've kept the weekly garbage so I can set out my garage garbage when needed and not pay the extra can fee. Setting out an extra can costs more than the difference between weekly/biweekly.
I normally take garage garbage to the dump myself, but they charge a $20 "tip fee" just for showing up (plus the weight of the garbage). So whenever possible I cut things up into pieces small enough to fit inside our normal garbage can. When the garage garbage can is full, I set that one out for pickup and save the house garbage till the following week.
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
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On 5/2/2016 10:51 PM, Arthur Cresswell wrote:

We pay by the bag for trash. Large bag is $2, small bag is $1 Recyclables are picked up free. There is a fee schedule for things like furniture too, but all seem reasonable.
I take my trash to the dumpster at work, but if I had to pay it would work out to about $12 a month.
In case some old lady here want to complain, we pay a fixed fee for weekly pickup of the dumpster so my trash add nothing to the cost. I'm not stealing. I've also given permission to a couple of others to use it too.
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Mike Duffy wrote on Mon, 02 May 2016 20:13:04 -0400:

That's a good point. Our trash bins are well made so the lid keeps animals out. Some people bungee cord them, but very few do.
There is only one hole which is where an aluminum bar goes through them around the middle (I think for the truck to latch onto), so they could hold water if it weren't for that middle bar.

There is an old joke that some people can afford to waste other people's resources! :)

We are on septic so sewage isn't a concern.

We are on a well, so the only cost for water is the electricity to pump it out.
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On 5/2/2016 7:49 PM, Arthur Cresswell wrote:

You have to remove the "latch" in order for the container to be dumped. Here, folks just put a large stone on top -- which inevitably falls off as the container is lifted above the truck, allowing the top flap to open.

Water is actually a problem in waste containers. Most municipalities are charged by weight (not volume). So, a container that collects and holds rainwater ends up costing the municipality extra -- for some weight that really isn't "stored" in the landfill.
OTOH, putting weep holes in the container allows stuff to get in (insects)

We pay for every gallon (CCF) we use -- *twice*: once for delivery/usage charges and once again for its presumed return via the sewage system (even if we "consume" the water on the premises -- e.g., irrigation)

Until your well runs dry. :> The NEXT gallon then becomes exceedingly expensive!
Or, until your groundwater supply is contaminated.
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On Monday, May 2, 2016 at 8:13:01 PM UTC-4, Mike Duffy wrote:

I can't speak for Mike Duffy, of course, but...
Flies seem to find a way in regardless. Our current container is provided by the trash hauler (we have no choice; it's designed to be picked up by the mechanical arm on the truck), and the lid doesn't close very tightly. When we bought our own garbage cans, flies still managed to get in to lay their eggs.
Luckily, it's only a problem in the summer here. Cold weather kills the little devils.
Cindy Hamilton
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RonNNN wrote on Mon, 02 May 2016 18:32:36 -0500:

Our trash costs 33 dollars a month, and is NOT subsidized by our taxes as far as I know.
They pick up once a week and we're allowed two 60 gallon blue bins, two 60 gallon green bins and one 25 gallon brown bin.
They say they make money on the recycling (blue) containers and on the landscape (green) containers but they lose money on the trash (brown) containers.
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On 5/2/2016 5:09 PM, Arthur Cresswell wrote:

Congrats on not loading up landfills. Not everyone takes recycling as far as you do. Some towns don't want contaminated paper such as pizza boxes or saturated meat wrappers, coated papers, anything with biological contamination. .
Some of the food you are composting is also good rodent bait. I prefer to dispose of it than have animals finding it. Those Q-tips you are putting in with the paper are not easily recycled, not to mention no one want to pick off your earwax. How about razor blades? Do you separate the metal blade from the plastic? I don't, I toss one a month.
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