What sucked my traps dry?

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LOL!.....
I have no idea what sucked your traps dry, but I do love the question. Sounds like it outta be a sage ol' saw, like, "well, that sure chaps my hide!" or "that really frosts my balls". I like it. Gonna use it.
"Well, that certainly sucks my traps dry!"
lol... nb
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Any use of this article without the NFL's...errrr...I mean...*my* express written consent is prohibited.
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Well, that certainly sucks my traps dry!!
nb --rofl...
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On 9/11/2012 8:54 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

a good wind storm can get the water "bounced" out of a toilet. from blowing across the roof stack. have wind that day?
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Steve Barker
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That was addressed earlier in the thread.
There was barely a breeze the day it happened and over the years we've had days with major wind events that did not impact the traps.
As I mentioned earlier, I looked at the man hole cover the other night and the seam around it was extremely clean, leading me to believe that the man hole had been opened and sewer work had been done.
Unless it happens again, I'm assuming that that was the cause and not worrying about it.
Thanks!
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I'm wondering if there's another way to reduce pressure in the main sewer relative to your drain lines.
What if they flushed the line with a large volume of water? The sewers I've had open have usually had a small amount of the line actually full of water, just a small flow at the bottom, and your line dumps in well above that. But if they were flushing with lots of water, the moving water might rise above your inlet, and pull your water out with it.
Not sure this happens but seems like it might be possible.
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