What size nut is on septic clean outs? (4" pipe)

I cannot bust this cleanout cap free to save my life and I'm afraid that I'm going to strip it with my adjustable wrench or pipe wrench. Some are square but some are not - this one is not. I'm thinking it's 1 5/16" My biggest socket is 1 1/4 and its a no go.
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On Nov 29, 8:55 pm, poison snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

You're going to break the cap whether you want to or not. Don't waste time on it. Just drill enough holes around the nut (staying away from the threads) to take it out in pieces. Then when you install the new cap, do what the original installer didn't, use teflon tape or a non hardening pipe dope to make it removable in the future. HTH
Joe
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I've done this on a spa repair. Cut off the top of the square cap. Cut two radial cuts from the center out with a hack saw blade or a saber saw. Pick a place where the plastic that is sticking up will give you something to grasp with the pliers. Where they come in contact with the outside of the circle should be about 1/2". DO NOT CUT INTO THE THREADS. Carefully, with pliers and whatever you can use, remove the small wedge. The rest of the plug will be easy to rotate by grasping it with pliers on one of the three remaining vertical walls of the square cap. Take your time. Take care not to damage the threads.
Steve
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A couple of problems - it's not a square cap that's why I was asking what socket size. Secondly, it's not plastic it's brass. Brass cap on a cast iron line.
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On Nov 30, 7:48 am, poison snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Your only hope is to get a six point socket the right size and an impact wrench. If you don't own them already, check a tool rental place for air compressor and impact. It may break up the brass, but that's not all bad. Failing that, you will have to drill and cut the plug to the point where it can be removed. Or you can call a plumber and watch while he deals with it. He may have some unique tricks, a monster torch or whatever, but it will be interesting. It may even be necessary to replace the whole threaded cast iron hub in the worst case, but at least give it a try to save a few $$ HTH
Joe
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Sorry I was so far off base. I'd try some hot hot water, then maybe a small torch. Soak with penetrant cold, then try it. Heat it up a bit and pour some penetrant on it and try that. After that, good luck.
Steve
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Just take a ruler and measure across the flats, keeping in mind that the socket will have to be a little loose to fit over the hex. There are stamped six sided sockets that are pretty inexpensive but you may have trouble getting enough leverage. A big pipe wrench will grip the plug, also.
One trick to loosen those plugs is to hit it in the middle hard enough to slightly dish it inwards. There is some risk of damaging the pipe or loosening a joint so you have to use good judgement.
It is not hard to use a drill and saw to remove the plug, as other posters have described.
Don Young
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Good judgment on something you've never done before is called good luck. ;)
R
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And bad judgment on something you've never done before is called learning ;-)
So, I guess he might as well whack the thing. Best case, the problem is solved and worst case he got some edewkayshun.
--
|~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~|
| Malcolm Hoar "The more I practice, the luckier I get". |
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On Nov 30, 10:15 pm, snipped-for-privacy@malch.com (Malcolm Hoar) wrote:

I finally busted that nut. I ordered a 1-5/16" socket and stuck it on the end of my breaker bar. Whaled on it for a second and it broke free.
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Ya got lucky. It could have been MUCH more complicated if it was truly frozen and you had to go to plan B.
Steve
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Microwave some water until it boils for a couple of minutes. Rush it out and pour it on the cap. That works for me for a lot of sticky situations.
Steve
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All good ideas. As I mentioned, I think the hex plug is 1-5/16" an odd size socket but they are out there. I couldn't find one locally but I was able to order a deep impact one for about $12. I tried PB Blaster, Liquid Wrench, put the Stilson wrench on it and smacked it with a 8lb sledge - it just took a piece of the brass off.
In the end I was able to get my electric snake through the sanitary T bend (where this cap was on the end of) but I had to work the hell out of it - and it would have been nice to put a flashlight in and see a few feet down the line.
When I get the socket I could use my impact wrench but I am think my six foot breaker bar is the answer. I forget how powerful my impact wrench is - I think it can only handle 240 ft/lbs. I think this is more like 500!
I can't get stuck with thing half on otherwise we'll have the entire contents off all the waste lines in the basement. I'll try my socket with I get it and then give someone a call if that fails. I am not dieing to get it off now that my snake job is over but I'd still like to get it taken care of.
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On Nov 30, 10:37 pm, poison snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

If your impact is such a wimp it's time to upgrade. The market has many of the newer design double hammer impacts out there and the original Ingersol-Rand 231 is still one dandy tool, and puts out 500 ft-lbs. Porter-Cable has an Asian knock off for around $110. There are others on Harbor Freight just fine for the occasional user. It's the same principle as the NFL uses hardly any 140 lb. linebackers. And don't forget, Sears sockets and such are made by the same people that make Matco, so you can order virtually anything you need online if it isn't already in the store. .Good luck.
Joe
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