What size fascia board?

I am building a detached garage and want the appearance of 6" fascia board. Will be using vented vinyl soffit that is about 1/2" (maybe more) in height. To take advantage of the 6" aluminum fascia cover, should I use 2x4 fascia so that the J of the aluminum fascia cover can accomodate the vinyle soffit? If I used 2x6 it seems the aluminum might not completely cover it and allow for the vinyl soffit. I am worried about the aluminum not having enough surface area support, although I guess that would only be an inch or so of unsupport.
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I used 2x6 rafters when I built our garage. This meant the rake board on the gable end was also a 2x6. When the rake board was plumb cut on the end where it met the fascia board, the diagonal cut is obviously taller than the 2x6.
So, I used a 2x8 fascia, and ripped the top edge at a bevel to match the roof slope. The height of the fascia matches the height of the plumb cut on the end of the rake board. This way the rake and fascia meet nicely at the corner of the roof.
If this doesn't matter to you, I would rip the 2x6 down to whatever size you need to support the 6" aluminum fascia cover.
Anthony
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On Wed, 28 Sep 2005 12:50:03 -0500, HerHusband wrote:

Out of curiosity, is there anything wrong with leaving the ends (rake board and rafter ends) un-cut and un-plumb and just nailing the fascia board on that way? Granted it would look a little unusual but for a garage or shed or fishing camp etc, who cares?.... but is there some structural reason why it needs to be plumb?
phantman
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snipped-for-privacy@hotpopcom.invalid wrote:

Lots of buildings been built that way...including the barn, several garages, the old granary, etc., here. All built in the 1910-1920 era. The one thing that Grandpa did on all was to box in under the rafter tails as well, though, rather than leave them open. OTOH, I've seen houses in town of roughly the same era w/ the rafers open, too.
So, do whatever you want...there's a precedent somewhere for virtually anything.
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On Wed, 28 Sep 2005 13:21:31 -0500, Duane Bozarth wrote:

LoL! Ok... just wanted to make sure the precedent didn't include rotten rafter tails or something like that ;-) Thanks.... Phantman
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snipped-for-privacy@hotpopcom.invalid wrote:

As long as the roof doesn't leak, there's no water there, anyway...
The reason for the vertical tails imo is primarily that it makes installing guttering simple. These buildings have no gutters--but of course, it doesn't rain much here (and not at all, recently)... :(
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There's no structural reason I know of. Lots of buildings have been built this way.
As Duane said, a plumb fascia makes it easier to attach gutters. Though there are gutter brackets that fasten to the roof to "hang" the gutter from above. Or, you may just eliminate the gutters altogether if you put rock around the building or otherwise reduce splashback onto the building.
Just from a practical standpoint, you aleady have to plumb cut the rafter at the peak, so it's not much more work to plumb cut the tail. If you have a power miter saw, it's the same angle. Cut, slide it down, and cut again. Easy. Cutting the bird-mouths where the rafter sits on the wall are more time consuming.
Anthony
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If you use a 2X6 fascia for the rakes and the overhang, it will work out OK. A 2X6 is 5 1/2" wide so if the soffit is 1/2" thick, that adds up to 6". When you put the roof on, you should use a drip edge on the bottom of the roof and a rake edge up the sides. Both these cover 1" below the roof. This should overlap the fascia by an inch, giving you a nice looking job.
--
JerryD(upstateNY)

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