What size electrical junction box fits a 1-inch diameter cable anyway?

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Today I tried to connect a 1-inch wide flexible conduit to what was billed as a 1-inch outdoor junction box:

However, the 1-inch side of the old elbow clearly was too small to fit the threads in the 1-inch hole of the new reputedly 1-inch junction box:

Yet, the 1-inch side of the old elbow was just as clearly too large to fit the threads in the 3/4 inch hole of a 3/4 inch junction box:

Clearly I'm confused. Or I bought the wrong type of junction box. Does a solution seem clear to you?
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wrote:

Conduit is measured based on ID not OD but that is a nominal size. Your Carflex LFNC looks like 3/4" but you need a connector to get into that 3/4" threaded hub.
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On May 14, 11:09 pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

+1
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On Wed, 15 May 2013 02:09:51 -0400, gfretwell wrote:

Does that mean that what I measured as the old 1-inch conduit and 1-inch elbow is actually a 3/4-inch conduit and elbow?

If that's the case, why doesn't it then fit the 3/4-inch junction box?
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On Wed, 15 May 2013 11:27:36 -0700, Oren wrote:

I had asked and the answer came back that it's to code to put the box on the concrete outside, as long as I use waterproof connections and a waterproof cover (all of which I already purchased).
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d

Danny-
Try listening to the guys in the newsgroup.... remember the code is a minimum standard. Mounting a box,even a "water proof" box, on the ground when an easy alternative exists is a bad idea.
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On Wed, 15 May 2013 21:40:37 -0700, DD_BobK wrote:

I've never wired using conduit before, so I can use all the suggestions I can get; however, I must have missed alternative mounting ideas.
How would you suggest the junction box be mounted? Should I raise it up on a block of wood?
BTW, I added silicone to waterproof the bottom of the box:

And I put di-electric grease on all the connections:

And, I added o-rings to every conduit connection:
Two questions I have regarding the setup below:

Q1: Would you drill into the concrete to firmly attach the box? Q2: Should I buy male spade connectors so as to connect spade to spade? (instead of the waterproof wire nuts?)
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m/photo/a/13045571/img/13045571.jpg

Some of the folks that have had discussion or issues with inspectors can probably give you a better answer regarding fastening it. It definitiely needs to be fastened and putting screws into the concrete would do that. However to avoid drilling, I wonder if construction adhesive would satisfy code? Not sure. I would be comfortable doing it for that application from a safety standpoint, but not sure what an inspector would say.
I think DerbyDad brought up the issue of raising it up higher. I don't believe that's required by code. If there is no pooling of water around the box likely, ie it runs off, then I wouldn't worry about it. If water can pool there, then putting something to raise it up an inch or so isnt' a bad idea. But I think most pool installers would just mount it to the deck.
I would not use spade terminals, more work and not typically how it would be done. And you're cutting the wires too short. I forget the exact code reqt, but think it's like 6" beyond the box. Don't go nuts, nobody is going to come measure them. But just looking at it, they appear short.
And not to get you into a rat hole, but just so you know and learn, there is a min box size allowed for a given number of wires of a given size. I would think that box is probably around the limit, you have 12 wires going into it. They don't want you to shove 10 lbs of stuff into a 5 lb bag,
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wrote:

com/photo/a/13045571/img/13045571.jpg

Forgot to add, in the pic on the conduit fitting on the lower left, there is a locknut showing on the outside of the box. That locknut is to secure the fitting inside a box that has no threads. It should not be on the outside, where there should be a o-ring seal.
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On Thu, 16 May 2013 06:40:32 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Thanks for that advice; all the locknuts were removed since all the conduit fittings are screwed into either the junction box or the motors:

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On Thu, 16 May 2013 06:24:03 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Interesting. I was keeping them to 3", but I didn't have a spec to go by.
Had I known it was 6", I would have added more.
I am buying wire today so I can buy some more and make them longer.
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On Thu, 16 May 2013 06:24:03 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Yikes.
Nobody mentioned that, 'till now.
This is a 31 cubic inch box, with two 10 AWG lines going in, and two coming out, for a total of 12 wires.
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On Thu, 16 May 2013 06:24:03 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I raised it up with a concrete stepping stone; and the concrete pad was already raised by an inch already (off the ground level):

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On Thu, 16 May 2013 06:24:03 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I removed all the wires and bought longer wires replaced the conduit:

I then made sure there was at least 6 inches inside the conduit box.

I also cut off and put fresh spade terminals on all the wires:

And, I greased all connections with di-electric grease:

I stripped the wires about a half inch for the wire nuts:

Before greasing and installing the wire nuts:

Note: I only realized the original wire was smaller than 10 AWG when I started stripping it to put the new spade connectors on, and when I twisted the wire nuts on. I suspect the old wire was 12 AWG or maybe even 14 AWG all along. My mistake.
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I think I told you early on that 12 was more than sufficient. That motor only pulls about 7 amps, so even 14 would be OK. I don't know how you got onto 10, but it's better to be too large, than too small. Only disadvantage is it;s harder to work with.
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On Fri, 17 May 2013 05:03:25 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

It's amazing how much collective knowledge there is on a.h.r!
I had physically eyeballed it. And I was wrong.
Also, I had measured the conduit. I was wrong there too.
I learned a lot in this, my first 220v wiring job ever!
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wrote:

If you are going to do this again, go to Home Depot and look over an assortment of the parts to get a better idea of what is available and what stuff looks like. If your store is like mine, you won't be disturbed by a pesky sales associate for an hour or so.
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wrote:

e

en

that 12 was more than sufficient. don't know how you got onto 10, but it's better to be too large,than too small. Only disadvantage is it;s harder to work with.
+1
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On Thu, 16 May 2013 10:09:26 -0700, Oren wrote:

Actually, it would drain about 40,000 gallons, because the pool equipment is 8 feet below the waterline, and the pool is only about 9 feet deep.
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On Fri, 17 May 2013 08:59:01 -0700, Oren wrote:

The main breaker panel is about four feet above the pool equipment.
The 40,000 gallons, if it were to overflow into the pool equipment would surely run down the hill, as it's all very steep stuff out here in the mountains. It would never even make it to the neighbor's yard.
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