What size drill bit for 1/4" mounting screw?

I am installing an under the counter Sony radio/CD player in my kitchen. The instructions call for 9/32" drill bit. The mounting screws are about 1/4" in diameter - not larger. Do I need to buy a 9/32" drill bit or can I use the 1/4" drill bit in my set? I am concerned that the holes will be too large and not hold the radio securely.
Thank you for anyone who can answer this probably simple question.
Mary
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Mary, 1/4" is equal to 8/32" which is 1/32 smaller than they recommend. If the screw fits through the hole, it's fine

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RBM wrote:

That was a common sense answer to simple question, LOL
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I am trying to save myself a trip to the hardware store and spending $8+ for a bit I will use one time. Plus I only paid $45 for the radio. Also, since I work and have no car it is a PITA to go to a hardware store.
The 1/4" drill bit I have is larger than the shank of the mounting screw.
Thanks, Mary PS I am a math statistics major but they never taught us anything about home repair.

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Use a finishing nail (small head) as your "drill bit"(works surprisingly well)......Or if your cabinet underside is plywood/wood instead of particle board you can probably use your drill to drive the screws without a pilot hole......Rod
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Mary Weatherford wrote:

Hi, Your simple question calls for common sense answer, LOL. What is the cabinet material? Wood? Melamine? MDF? I'd just use pick or real small bit to make a pilot hole and drive the screw in. Vari speed power screw driver is handy on a job like this.
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Is the hole just for the screws to pass through? If so the 1/4" will be fine. If the screws don't fit easily, you can use the 1/4" bit again and "wiggle" it a bit while drilling and this will enlarge the hole.
--
charles

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The
in
Find a waste piece of the material similar to the material you're going to be mounting the radio to, try to drill though that and drive the screw. If you have good bite, you're home. Pat
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I think maybe the screw is intended to go through the hole and be held by a nut - I don't think it's a wood screw but a bolt. In which case the 1/4" bit will work fine, just wiggle it a bit to enlarge the hole slightly if needed.
Mary, did you do it yet? How did it turn out?
--
charles

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Thank you all for your input. The radio will be mounted on the underside of a kitchen cabinet. I think the cabinet bottom is a material similar to masonite. This is rental unit so I don't have any information about the construction of the cupboards. I do not have any scraps to test the drill bit. The cabinet is too small to get the drill inside so I will have to go at it from the underside. I have a template from Sony for drilling the holes. I have back problems and drilling at that angle is highly unlikely for me. I will need help with this so I don't have an update on my progress. Sony only described the screws as mounting screws. They look like a kind of machine screw with slightly rounded Philips heads. The screws fit into adjustable spacers to enable the radio to fit under any cabinet. The screws go in to the radio to hold it in place.
Mary

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