What size breaker and wire for a 5200W wall oven?

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What size breaker and wire do I need to use for a new installation (not new oven) of a 5200W wall oven.
2 lines of text for electrical. 120/240 VAC. 60HZ. 5.2KW. 3 WIRE 120/208 VAC. 60HZ. 3.95KW. 3 WIRE
Current wires coming out of the oven are 3 at 12 AWG black, red, green, and a 16 AWG white. I am not sure if they are original to the oven or not. I couldn't find the manual online. I acquired this oven used.
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30a based on a 21.66a load (5200/240) but the real answer is in the installation manual. My new GE oven calls for a 20. It may not have the same power elements in it tho.
On Tue, 20 Sep 2016 16:14:01 +0000, Brent

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P = VA
A = V/P
12AWG is insufficient at 208 or 240VAC.
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Brent-
Red and Black wires should go to each side of 240 VAC, White should go to Neutral or Common, and Green should go to the metal frame. But you need to verify how the wires are connected inside the oven, or you could have a serious problem.
Your oven would draw 21.7 Amperes for 5200 Watts. A dual 25 Amp breaker should be OK unless there is a 120 VAC outlet. In that case, I'd go for a bigger breaker.
I'm not familiar with the codes that specify required wire size. 12 AWG might be OK for 30 Amps, but I would prefer 10 AWG.
Fred
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75-242-165.myvzw.com:

Then you probably shouldn't be trying to offer wiring advice.
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Some people prefer physics to regulations.
--
Can you grow birds by planting birdseed?

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replying to Brent, Brent wrote: I did just finally find an Amana document with my model number that adds 40amp to the end of the electrical lines of text on model plate. So would that mean I need a 40A breaker and 10 gauge wire?
In the manual it says: "Line Voltage Requirements Line voltage must not exceed rated voltage. Line voltage less than rated voltage will result in slow heating. Wiring system must conform to U.L. Standards and National Electrical Code. Installation must conform to all local, municipal and state building codes, and local utility regulations. Oven must be connected only to a supplied circuit as specified on rating plate. This oven requires 3 wires, 115/230-120/240 volts, 60 Hertz A.C. Unit is equipped with a No. 10 ground wire in conduit. Oven should be fused separately from other appliances. Verify electric power is off from fuse box to junction box until oven is installed and ready to operate."
Maybe I need to open it up where the flex conduit enters the oven and see what else I can find...
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On Tuesday, September 20, 2016 at 3:14:06 PM UTC-4, Brent wrote:

We don't know because we can't see what you're reading, don't know how you're interpreting it, don't know what exactly is on the eqpt plate, in the manual, etc. But if it needs 40A, then you need 8g wire.
How you get to 40A, IDK, because all I see is 22A at 240V = 5200 watts But a typical oven could by 40A.
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replying to Brent, Brent wrote: here are the from the spec sheet I was able to locate
Electrical Requirements 120/240 VAC, 60 Hz, 5.2 Kw, 3-wire, 40 Amp 120/208 VAC, 60 Hz, 3.95 Kw, 3-wire, 40 Amp Oven Wattage @ 240V Bake 2,000 Broil, Insta-BroilTM 3,000
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replying to Brent, Tony944 wrote: As you stated your oven have two settings one is for bake and other to Broil. I am sure you can use one or the other but "NOT" both at the same time! At the broil rough estimate of current would be 13-14 Amps. On the bake again rough estimate current will be 9-10 Amps. This is base on 220 power source, number 12 wire would be sufficient enough. Likewise the breaker 20-25 Amps ok. Two poles!! Your white wire is for lights and possible outlet if it has one…
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On Tuesday, September 20, 2016 at 6:14:06 PM UTC-4, Tony944 wrote:

Very odd then that it says 5200W at 240V. It would also be odd for a new oven to use just 14 amps. They don't typically wire them up with 40A circuits for nothing. It would take a very long time to wait for your dinner. Do you like to wait?

I've never seen a 220V power source, only 240V. Maybe it exists somewhere in the USA, but AFAIK, it's not common. Apparently Amana thinks so too, they spec the oven at 240V.

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Tue, 20 Sep 2016 23:29:11 GMT in alt.home.repair, wrote:

http://preview.tinyurl.com/59bf3j
How long have you been an electrician? Just curious, mind you.
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MID: <nb7u27$crn$ snipped-for-privacy@boaterdave.dont-email.me>
Hmmm. I most certainly don't understand how I can access a copy of a
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On Tuesday, September 20, 2016 at 9:38:15 PM UTC-4, Diesel wrote:

What exactly is that ridiculous link supposed to prove? It starts off with:
Dear Cecil:
"How come the U.S. is practically the only country in the world where household electricity is 110 volts instead of 220 volts?"
Obviously they are very confused because the common residential voltages here are 120/240, not 110. Again, 110/220 may exist somewhere in the US today, but I've never seen it. Have you? Where?
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Tue,

It doesn't prove anything. Only that 120volt wasn't always the norm. Long before my time on this planet, though. You shouldn't take everything I write so personally...
--
MID: <nb7u27$crn$ snipped-for-privacy@boaterdave.dont-email.me>
Hmmm. I most certainly don't understand how I can access a copy of a
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snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net says...

Years ago , around 1950 , many items were listed as operating on 110 or 220 volts. My dad repaired appliances during that era and often said 110 and 220. If I don't watch it,I will say the same thing even though most household items are listed as 120 and 240 volts. At one time near the middle 1950's items were rated for 115 volts. The 'standard' home voltage seems to have gone from 110 to 115 to 120 volts over the last 70 years.
The 208 voltage is from the way single phase power is taken from a 3 phase circuit. I am not sure what those voltages have done over the years. I worked as an electrician for a large company and seldom worked on anything that operated on 208 volts. Only had one or two electrical panels with that and 120 volts in it. Everything else was 120/240 volt rated for the office areas. Most of the work I did was with the 480 volt 3 phase circuits or the 277 volts you get off that for the lights.
At one time you had to specify if you wanted the 220/240 volt operation or the 208 lower voltage. Probably depends on what area of the country you are in.
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Ralph Mowery laid this down on his screen :

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mains_electricity#Standardisation
"Historically 110 V, 115 V and 117 V have been used at different times and places in North America. Mains power is sometimes spoken of as 110 V; however, 120 V is the nominal voltage."

The 208V figure comes from the voltage between two legs of the three phase supply. Usually, the entire three phases are used for the three phase applications or one of the legs to neutral (120V) is used for single phase applications.

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You can call it 110 or 120 interchangeably.
It hasn't actually varied in my lifetime, other than the normal day to day variation with load.
That's an RMS value, the peak is around 170.
Similarly when I worked in a factory the voltage was 440, 460, or 480, depending on who was talking, but it was all the same jolts.
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TimR expressed precisely :

Yes, but one of those would be wrong.

No "brownouts" then? Of course, we're not really talking about actual voltages here, but the nomenclature instead.

Yes, but it is best to stick to one measure throughout a discussion.

As long as everyone understands each other, then there is no harm. When using figures like that in engineering, everyone should use the 'correct' voltage in their computations.
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On Thursday, September 22, 2016 at 4:50:44 PM UTC-4, FromTheRafters wrote:

Or how about it hasn't varied from what? 110? or 120? Here it's 120V at the panel, with minor variation.
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On Thursday, September 22, 2016 at 3:33:27 PM UTC-4, TimR wrote:

People can call it whatever they want, but that isn't how the power industry operates and it just adds to the confusion. AFAIK, they have a voltage spec that they try to deliver and in all the places I've been around the USA, that's 120V, not 110. Apparently Ammana, the manufacturer of the oven in question agrees, because you'll see that they spec it at 240V, not 220V. Which is why I asked where anyone has seen 110V today as the norm in the USA?
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