What's the life of a carbon monoxide detector?

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When they first came out at least one brand incorporated the "sensor" with the battery. The sensor has somekind of "artificial" blood with respospnded to the CO in much the same manner as human blood.
In any house with gas appliance you should have one or two CO detectors with one being a "digital readout" type. These will show very small amounts of CO such as what happens when you burn something in the stove. The response to small levels gives you confidence that it will sound the alarm if the need arises.

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I'm going to call the gas company and see if they will come out with an instrument. Not sure if they will (or if they will for FREE), but it's worth a call.
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Mitch@_._ wrote:

Also if you have gas, you should consider the dual CO/GAS alarms that are available for not much more, since gas is it's own hazard without necessarily having CO present. Also note for these combo alarms the mounting location needs to vary depending on whether you have nat. gas or LP gas since nat. gas rises and LP gas sinks.
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Oh my God.
I called the fire department's non-emergency number, because someone told me they will do a carbon monoxide check as a public service.
They sent a fire truck and three ambulances to our house with full sirens and lights! It was a freak show. I felt like such an idiot!
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Mitch@_._ wrote:

What did they find? How is everyone feeling? A whole family with complaints of being dizzy and light headed is not something to ignore. What was the food? Did you call a doc?
I know of two families who had CO poisoning but not very ill. The first, a bad furnace. The second, a fireplace pulling exhaust from gas appliances into the home. When the first family had their furnace checked, the CO level was so high the guy wouldn't let them go back in the house. They had had headaches and mild nausea. I had been in their home, with my family, and my eyes burned like someone put acid in them, but rest of my family had no symptoms. I felt the burning in my eyes as soon as I went into the house, and my family was there longer than I. I mentioned it to the head of the maintenance dept. where I work, and he is the one who clued us as to the CO problem.
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wrote:

No CO anywhere. They said we were right to suspect it, and that "Full Response" is just the standard way they operate.
But my poor mother-in-law was down the street and she freaked. She came running to the house crying. The last time we had an emergency, my wife had had a brain aneurysm.
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I would suggest that six years is likely the max I would trust.
What I do is keep the new one in the second floor hall outside my bedroom and the older one on the first floor. I buy a new on a bout every four or five years. Same with smoke alarms.

--
Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
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Mitch@_._ wrote:

I don't know of any that have anything near 14 year sensor lives. I think 3-4 years is typical for sensor life. All the newer CO detectors have self test modes and sensor life monitors to alert you when the sensor has reached the end of it's life.
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Pete C. wrote:

Several years ago I bought glass ampules containing a defined quantity of carbon monoxide from a fire department supply house...extinguisher recharging, etc.
The ampule and the CO detector are placed in a known volume container (a ziplok like bag.) The ampule is then broken and the time to an alarm is measured. Since I have a wood stove in my bedroom, and use several cords each winter I repeat this test every other month throughout the winter. No detector faults so far.
Boden
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To answer my original question,l the fire department said the lifespan of a CO detector is 5-7 years.
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If you ever need help again, do not hesitate to ask.
Steve
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