What's the best way to refinish inside wooden doors?


I have 6 inside wood hollow flat (not paneled or paned) brown wood doors taht are dirty and in need of a fresher look.
What's the proper way to freshen up these single-sheet plywood doors?
Do I hand sand or buy a belt sander? Seems that a belt sander will go right through the door in seconds, so that is why I ask.
What's the best way to refinish single-sheet hollow wooden inside bedroom doors?
Thanks, Glenda
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Glenda Copeland | 2010-01-23 | 12:31:01 PM wrote:

The veneer is very thin. Use a palm sander.
But, you might just need some freshening. Try various cleaning products first. Start with TSP (trisodum phosphate). I've had good luck with "refinishing" wipe-on products. Look for those at your local woodworking shop.
--
Steve Bell
New Life Home Improvement
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There is " liquid refinisher" available at HD. Lowes, Ace Hardware, etc. Definitely do not use any electrically operated sander unless you are willing to buy new doors.
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Glenda Copeland wrote:

Don't use it, too agressive.

Paint.
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dadiOH
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dadiOH wrote:

Hardly. All that does is make them look like old hollow-core doors. Best cure is cleaning them with whatever will take off all the years of grime and hand oil near the knobs (Murphy's and Formby's make products for this), a light hand sanding (with the grain), and then a wiped-on/wiped-off layer of a matching gel stain to disguise the nicks. I've had excellent luck with the Minwax gel stains in the squeeze bottles. A little bit goes a long way- all you are trying to do is refresh the old finish a little. Don't kill yourself trying to do this in place- take down one or two doors at a time, and do it on sawhorses in the garage. If the door casings are stained rather than painted, you will want to do the same thing to them.
Same technique works pretty good on tired 'real wood' kitchen cabinets, too, at a fraction of the cost of even crappy new cabinets.
Hey, the above may work, may not. But all it takes is about 30 bucks in supplies, a little time, and a little elbow grease. And if it doesn't work, you are no worse off than when you started. -- aem sends...
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wrote:

If elbow grease don't work, then face the door with veneer. If worthy of the cost time and effort.
http://www.refacedepot.com/helpers/veneer-roll.jpg
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You do know you can get new ones at Homedepot for 20 -30 bucks ??? Just saying.....
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On Sun, 24 Jan 2010 00:39:58 -0500, benick wrote:

It's 100 bucks and I'd need to drill holes and cutouts for hinges and latches. Yuck.
I'll try the recommended fluids 1) trisodium phosphate http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trisodium_phosphate 2) Formby's ($50) http://www.formbys.com/products / 3) Murphy Oil Soap ($50) (http://www.acehardware.com/product/index.jsp?productId605020
It seems sanding by hand might be too much work and replacing them too expensive, leaving only cleaning as an option.
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Glenda Copeland wrote:

????
Just checked HD's web site. Flush hollowcore veneer door slabs show at 20 bucks each in 2-8 width. Of course, that is the naked slab, so you would have to prep and finish them.
-- aem sends,,,
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No , you could just leave them as is...If a 100 bucks scares you and sanding or drilling holes is to much work that's the way to go...Atleast till you save some money or get some ambition or know how...Those type of doors are VERY flimsy and one boo boo and you will be in trouble...I learned long ago that you don't start a project that you can't afford to finish if something goes wrong cuz something always seems to.......LOL...
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On Jan 23, 10:31am, Glenda Copeland <gscopel...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

Sprucing up these doors is going to either be a fair amount of time / work or some time & money.
My mom's house has medium color (lighter than a golden oak) hollow core slab doors. Seven doors total. Years ago we sanded and varnished them...they turned out pretty well and have aged gracefully (fewer occupants in the home since the rework).
But at this point they are quite dated as are the door casing & base molding.
As others have suggested and I would agree, clean them first with TSP or Murphy's Oil soap.
Do not use a hand belt sander. I would suggest a 1/3 sheet sanding block or if you want to risk it (& spend the $'s / save the time) consider a commenrcial drum sander. A typical drum sander would make short work of this task but verify with the drum sander that he can do it without destroying the doors.
IMO the best way to update the house & "spruce up the doors"....consider replacing with Masonite 6 panel prehung doors. They are dirt cheap (& pretty flimsy) but they paint up great and look decent. In the process you can update the door casing and do the base now or later.
cheers Bob
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Glenda Copeland wrote:

I've got one door with a hole in it, apparently from being butted by a unicorn.
I've been keeping my eye open for the right-sized stained glass wall-hanging. My plan is to dick with the door and use this yet-to-be-found wall-hanging as an insert.
Just another idea.
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Door? Hole? Dick?
You need to move your reply to some other appropriate group.
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On Sat, 23 Jan 2010 18:31:01 +0000 (UTC), Glenda Copeland

Belt sanders are very aggressive, these are not "finish" sanders. A light hand sanding with 220 grit is best, that is, if that is all you need. If you hand-sand use a block and be careful about the edges. I can't see your doors but you may need more.
Remove doors and drive two nails into the bottom edge, one nail in the middle of top edge. This strategy allow you to rest the door on two saw horses so you can easily flip the door. Remove hardware, mask hinges. Prime your doors, then apply 2-3 finish coats. Use an enamel or glossy high-quality paint. Follow the paint manufacturer's directions carefully. A low-nap roller might be better than a brush for the faces. Make sure all six sides are finished to help prevent warp. I prefer to allow painted doors to fully cure for several weeks before installing them.
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