What's the best way to punch a 2" hole for a drain pipe through a cinder block wall?

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What's the best way to punch a 2" hole for a drain pipe through a cinder block wall?
I've researched a variety of suggestions from a hammer and a star drill, to drilling a ring of small holes in a circle with a carbide bit to renting or buying a diamond tipped core bit. What's the best way of doing it so as NOT to crack the block?
-- Bobby G.
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On Tue, 3 Jun 2008 23:37:02 -0400, "Robert Green"

How about a carbide hole saw?
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

If you don't mind the noise, a ,22 rifle can get the job done. Watch out for block & bullets bouncing ;)
Free men own guns - www(dot)geocities(dot)com/CapitolHill/5357/
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wrote:

cinder
drill, to

renting or

as
I'll keep that in mind.
-- Bobby G.
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Didn't rerad all the comments, but did anyone mention the moron that fired a bullet through the wall for his cable? Killed his wife with a clean shot. I wonder if the guy had any cable parts laying around?
I once pounded a 4" or 5" hole in 10" of solid concrete for a dryer vent. That took a cold chisel, 24oz hammer, and a lot of beer. I didn't know i couldn't do it....so I did it! My arms were like Jello after that.

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a
I
My wife might take offense at that method.

That
couldn't do

Who knows more about making holes than Vlad the Impaler? Rotary hammer it is!
(-:

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wrote:

to
or
Know a good place to get a 2" one on-line? So far, I've seen them in kits for about $200 for six. Can a regular 1/2" 110VAC drill power one?
-- Bobby G.
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Robert Green wrote:

You might try a 2" metal hole saw. They should be available at the box stores and don't cost much. Here's a quick hit on a 2.5" hole bit for $15.00. http://www.doityourself.com/invt/u306624
As for 1/2" drill, should be no problem - they should run at a MUCH slower speed than when drilling wood.
OR
You could just poke an ugly opening, insert a 2.5" bit of PVC, then fill the void up with cement.
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I suspect that masonry is best attacked with "sterner stuff" - something with a carbide or diamond tip. Thanks for the suggestion, though. I've been able to find carbide tipped hole saws for not much more and I probably wouldn't have to worry about it becoming too dull to even finish the job.

A hammer drill seems to be a better proposition for drilling through masonry. Even the big 1" model is dirt cheap compared to some other options. I might just use the masonry bits I have in the drill I have to see what kind of progress I can make. The ring of small holes sounds like the best way to go and the small bits are far cheaper than hole saws.

the
Well, I'm afraid that will probably be the end product no matter what approach I take. Experience is gained proportional to the amount of equipment or material ruined.
-- Bobby G.
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On Wed, 4 Jun 2008 11:28:06 -0400, "Robert Green"

I got a smaller one at Home Depot to drill a couple holes in a tile counter for a faucet. I am not sure how big they go.
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wrote:

kits
Thanks for the info. As long as I know they can be had at the WorkBench I'm happy. Gonna try it with just the non-hammer 1/2" drill and a carbide bit hole saw from the Borg and escalate from there . . .
-- Bobby G.
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You did ask for the best. A dry diamond core can mounted on a right angle grinder. Clean and efficient.
--
______________________________
Keep the whole world singing . . . .
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Yes I did. But I own neither. I probably should have added that I would prefer a solution that would work with a run of the mill, 1/2" AC power drill that I do own.
Thanks for the suggestion.
-- Bobby G.
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I have used them all. FIrst of all, I am sure you don't really have a cinder block wall. Many people wrongly call concrete blocks, cinder blocks which were made from coal cinders. Making a hole in real cinder blocks is easy, they are soft and can be punctured without much effort. Now concrete blocks are different, they are hard and brittle.
You can use any method and it will not crack the block unless you use extreme force to do the job. The easiest is to rent a large drill and bit from your local big box store. The hardest part is to find out if you have two core or three core blocks. New walls will be 2 core. Whatever method you use will work best if you miss the web in the block. You may have to do some small hole drilling to find the core and web. Old blocks with 3 cores are easy to work if you drill through the center and hit the center core. Newer blocks will only have two cores and you will hit the web if you drill in the middle, so you need to drill 1/3 of the way from the end. The year that manufacturers changed to two core blocks will vary according to when they changed machines and moulds.

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Also makes a difference if you have re-bar on every 3rd coarse and blocks filled with concrete like mine are :)

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Yes, vertical re-bars mortared in the cores, sometimes from footing up to the sill plate, can cause problems. You may want to check with a metal detector to see if you can find any. Horizontal reinforcement would most likely be in the mortar joint, so avoid penetrating in this area.

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A good idea, but I'm betting there's no rebar because everything was in short supply in 1942. They skipped on things like putting building paper between the subfloors so the open basement ceiling rains down plaster dust on the stuff below. Such an easy thing to have done right during construction and now such a bitch to remediate.
-- Bobby G.
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blocks
Well, if my previous experience of trying to drill through to the basement and managing to hit a discarded hammer head inside the wall cavity is any indication, I'll run into something nasty. Acutually, now that I am reading through this, I realize there's a dryer duct installed that I can pull that should give me a better idea of what I am facing. Thanks for the input.
-- Bobby G.
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Excellent points. The worry about 'crackign the block' is no biggee. The likely hood of making a tight fitting 2" hole without using a core drill is zero so it will have to be patched in any case. I have done the BFH route and patched the remains later, used a 3/8" hammer drill and small concrete bit and probably a few other methods. If I ever have to do it again it will be 'rent a real electric hammer and decent bit, drill a ring of holes and knock out with hammer' Of course being careful to miss the web.
Harry K
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if its not a daily reoccuring job a harbor freight hmmer drill, is cheap and effective
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