What's better than Windex?

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I am a rather lazy house keeper and have not done my outside windows for many years. Today, in order to better view the hummingbirds, I tried to get the grime off of one of the windows. I tried SIX times with Windex and some of the grime remains. Is there anything stronger than Windex?
---MIKE---

>> (44° 15' N - Elevation 1580')
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On Thu, 9 Aug 2007 13:33:19 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (---MIKE---) wrote:

I have good luck using _Sudsy Detergent Ammonia_ and warm water (Dollar store).
You can also try Vinegar. -- Oren
"I didn’t say it was your fault, I said I was blaming you."
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used to clean windows in a school.used 1 vinegar,1 ammonia and 1 liquid soap.
http://www.minibite.com/america/malone.htm
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Do not mix vinegar an ammonia.... they react chemically and make a very nasty gas.

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No, that is ammonia and bleach. When mixed together, they make chloramines, a toxic gas.
Ammonia is a base (alkaline), vinegar is an acid. There are hundreds of recipes for cleaning solutions that contain both.
I've not tried this yet, but will soon as it is highly recommended Window Cleaner ******************* 1/2 cup ammonia 1/2 cup vinegar 2 tbsp corn starch 1 gallon of water This is the neatest window cleaner I have ever found. I do use the oven cleaner to clean the window on my glass doored wood stove, but I spray it on a cloth and then wipe the window (when the window is cold).
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go to the automotive section of any store and buy a "automotive" glass cleaner. THey come under variuos names. They are super window cleaners.
Sometimes buffing with a sheet of newspaper as a final step helps also.
If its a double pane window, make sure the grime is on the outside. THeres nothing you can do if the dirt is between the two panes of glass.
I am a rather lazy house keeper and have not done my outside windows for many years. Today, in order to better view the hummingbirds, I tried to get the grime off of one of the windows. I tried SIX times with Windex and some of the grime remains. Is there anything stronger than Windex?
---MIKE---

>> (44° 15' N - Elevation 1580')
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wrote:

For me just buying and using a cheap half gallon jug of Sudsy_Detergent_Ammonia works fine for home and auto. I've used it to clean inside homes and vehicles with heavy smokers. It really cleans up the road grime on a windshield. I dilute it on the strong side.
Used with a micro fiber cloth; you'll see nice clean windows.
-- Oren
..through the use of electrical or duct tape, achieve the configuration in the photo..
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In my experience, 409 Window & Glass Cleaner (the purple stuff) beats Windex hands down.
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---MIKE--- wrote:

I had a heck of time trying to clean my windows, until I tried Zap! Glass and Surface Cleaner. I got it at the Dollar General Store. It costs about $1.50 for a 32 oz. spray bottle. It works great getting that film off of the windows.
Bill Gill
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on 8/9/2007 1:33 PM ---MIKE--- said the following:

Only a woman knows what is the best window cleaner. I recently bought a window cleaner in Sam's Club that came in an aerosol bottle. It's called "Invisible Glass" made by Stoner (whoever that is). My wife says it is better than Windex. I'm gonna take her word for it (the alternative is not pleasant). :-).
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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She's right. Stoner stuff is easier to find at your FLAPS than a general department store. Also, nothing beats using 0000 steel wool with the cleaner of your choice, assuming that your windows are uncoated glass. I've done the steel wool on many a windshield that was previously impossible to see through; it'll get out everything except the pits.
nate
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Good stuff!
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---MIKE--- wrote in message
I am a rather lazy house keeper and have not done my outside windows for many years. Today, in order to better view the hummingbirds, I tried to get the grime off of one of the windows. I tried SIX times with Windex and some of the grime remains. Is there anything stronger than Windex? *******
Many years ago I took this tip out of a magazine, and I've never used anything else. It works wonderfully.
In a bucket, combine 1/4 cup liquid diswasher detergent and 1 tablespoon Jet-Dry brand dishwasher rinse agent for every gallon of hot water. Apply to windows with a soft brush, or terry dishtowel, and then hose off. The water sheets up and rolls off without streaking, and with no wiping and no drying.
It really works, you'll be amazed. :-)
Cheri
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on 8/9/2007 4:07 PM Cheri said the following:

I'd be amazed if my wife hosed off the inside of the windows. :-)
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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used
and
LOL, yes...there is that. However, it could be a great way to get the other spouse to take over window washing duties in the future. ;-)
Cheri
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on 8/9/2007 4:45 PM Cheri said the following:

I doubt that. Men would live in a cave if they had their druthers. :-)
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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willshak wrote:

And drive old army surplus Jeeps, yes. Both may be easily cleaned with a garden hose. :)
nate
(too lazy to frickin' DUST fercryinoutloud)
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
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on 8/9/2007 7:27 PM Nate Nagel said the following:

What is a garden hose? We leave it out in the rain, or during a drought, use urine. :-).
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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I already do....
Someone else suggested ammonia and vinegar. I wouldn't mix them in the same container. One's acid, the other is alkaline.
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
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On Fri, 10 Aug 2007 16:03:07 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

The vinegar is a weak acid so there is no need for concern. But, mixing these two neutralizes the pH which is not much better than plain water. It would be more effective to clean with household ammonia, rinse, then clean again with vinegar. I found nothing better than household ammonia for cleaning glass. Some "films" or debris on glass may require another cleaner. Muriatic acid is mostly HCl, a strong acid, is highly reactive and can be hazardous.
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